Pros and cons of this new fangled mixing...

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by devinb, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. devinb

    devinb Member

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    I've finished tracking all of my parts on an EP...there's plenty to be tracked still, but it looks like it will drag on until at least May do to the schedules of some of the other players involved...

    For the most part I've been working out of the 'B' room, which still isn't computer based...we're recording to HD24.

    I'm extremely happy with my engineer in every respect...for the most part we haven't done anything super crazy, but he seems to have an uncanny sense of what I'm going for. He also is light years ahead of an intern who is probably close to the same age, and has been at the studio for year...I'm really really pleased with him...

    So, now that I'm done playing, I'm starting to turn my attention to mixing...we've given ourselves lots to work with...sometimes having vocal takes that are mic'd a number of different ways, and then having some of them run through a Leslie and such...

    I've been reading up a lot on the process of recording, this is my third professional studio project, but first where I'm really calling most of the shots in terms of trying to shape what the final product will sound like...in the past it's always been as a member of a band where we all tried not to step on any toes too much...but all of my reading has been about the making of albums that were done years ago...predating DAW's and such...

    I am most interested in the final product, but I can't say that I'm not without my prejudices.

    So what I'm hoping you guys can help me with is this...are there any significant advantages to mixing within a computer that justify a rate that's more than double? It seems some of the appeal is to be able to immediately return to the mixes years later...

    I'm not picturing needing you use a lot of automations at this point...

    There are some things that I know I will want to be able to use the computer for...for example, I suspect it will be much easier to blend multiple vocal signals captured with different mics for effect with a computer...but is there any sense in doing other things with the help of the computer?
     
  2. Bassomatic

    Bassomatic Silver Supporting Member

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    They charge double the rate to mix in the digital domain?

    Hmmm.

    If the mixes are on the basic side, you might just keep it analog (depending on the desk and outboard options). Often it sounds better due to the certain something of analog summing.

    Or...

    Have them dump all the tracks to pro tools and take to a studio with a rate that's more comfortable to you.

    Maybe it's the places I've worked (as client and staff), but I've never come across a place that charges 2x as much to mix in the box.
     
  3. devinb

    devinb Member

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    2 different control rooms...the 'A' is computer based, where as the 'B' room is an old Trident console and an Alesis HD24 (basically 3 ADATs rolled into one with a hard drive).

    The 'A' room has better outboard gear for sure...I'm just not sure if I can justify the price difference...we've been really selective about sounds as we recorded them...I had access to all the high end mics, used their Steinway Grand on a song...we've been working to not leave much to have to fix, just enhance a little...

    In the end, the price probably isn't a huge concern...I'm not expecting mixing to take terribly long, it's only 6 songs, 5 of them based on my acoustic and voice, though there will be quite a bit of additional parts added...I'm really interested in an extremely consistent sound throughout though...I suspect that my acoustic will be mixed exactly the same on most of the tracks...most of the songs will only have one electric guitar...for the drums I'm thinking about using the 2 mic technique someone posted here a while ago...all and all, it's going to be very bare bones...I kind of want the recording to have the feel of the self-titled Velvet Underground album...

    So far I've only used about 7 hours to track everything I've done, which included a lot of experimenting...I did a Fender Rhodes part that was then ran through a number of amps, mic'ing the front and back of open back amps...ran some vocals through a Leslie...did harmonies on a 4 songs...and so on...in way I want it to have the feel of an album where mics were just set up, and the band played...

    It's not the computer that costs more...that said, I am wondering a bit if having the use of it may ultimately save some time, bringing the relative cost down a bit? I think that probably would have been the case a few times already, when we were working with difficult punch-ins.
     
  4. Bassomatic

    Bassomatic Silver Supporting Member

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    Having the project bounced to DVD will definitely make it easier down the road if you guys decide to remix or simply redo one or two of the mixes if they don't come out as well as you'd like under the analog gun.
     
  5. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    ITB will give you the ability to instantly recall the whole mix.

    Analog may sound better, if your engineer knows what he's doing. Better be sure you like the mix, tho.

    We migrated to ITB w/analog summing, due to overwhelming client request.

    Loudboy
     

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