PRS SE245 sustain?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Riffzilla, Dec 6, 2018 at 5:13 PM.

  1. Riffzilla

    Riffzilla Member

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    Thought I was set on getting a "proper" LP, but recently borrowed one from my friend and realised why I sold mine - horrible upper fret access and the edge of the body digs into my picking arm. Just not comfortable for long rehearsals. However what I do really like is the sustain, thicker tone and just how easy and fluid they feel and sound for lead work. I'm used to an SG which feels much "stickier" to play.

    I'm liking the looks of the PRS SE245 as an "improved" Les Paul. Softer edges, better neck heel and they seem to be generally a bit lighter on average. My question is will I get all those things I like about an LP I listed above? I can live with the tone not matching 100% as imo that sort of thing can generally be compensated for with pickup choice when the woods and construction are so similar.
     
  2. customguitars87

    customguitars87 Member

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    These guitars are different, and there are plenty of differences even between two examples of the same exact guitar. There's no way to predict what you'll get in buying one and whether or not it'll match your standards. Just grab one from GC Used, 45 days should be more than enough time to decide if it'll give ya what ya need.
     
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  3. Riffzilla

    Riffzilla Member

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    That's a good point! My other question was how does the tone and sustain compare between the PRS singlecut models and the classic PRS doublecut shape with stoptail? I've always been a Gibson player over fender shape, so I'm favouring the singlecut design and control layout, but then part of me thinks if I want a PRS it should be a "proper" shaped one.
     
  4. jiml

    jiml Supporting Member

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    If you want Les Paul tones, man up and buy a Les Paul. I tried tons, none will get you there
     
  5. misterg71

    misterg71 Supporting Member

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    While I agree no 2 guitars, even those that are identical in specs will sound exactly alike. I do believe there is a “general” sound achieved when using a set neck, Mahogany neck/bodied with Maple capped guitars. I’ve had tons of Les Pauls and quiet a few different PRS guitars in my time. I’m of the opinion that an SE245 very well can get you to where you want to be. I had an SE245 about a year ago, and it sustained extremely well. However, until you try one for yourself, you’ll never “know”.
     
  6. Riffzilla

    Riffzilla Member

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    Disagree. Just found this clip. They sound near enough identical, the beast maybe having an ever so slightly brighter attack. Something that could be easily matched with pickups or something else being adjusted in the signal chain



    Fwiw that's not the kind of tone I'd ever go for, but it illustrates the difference (or lack of) between the guitars tones.

    I'm all for traditional designs but if they can be improved upon (which Les Pauls definitely can) then I'm even more into that.
     
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  7. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    If you have the chance, try a few SE245s side by side. You may find that even in the same model, some are more like a Les Paul than others. And of course for the luxury experience, you might consider a core 245. SEs are very good for their price point and they aren't half bad regardless of price. But a core 245 will still likely be a cut above.
     
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  8. JohnK24

    JohnK24 Supporting Member

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    Or find a used S2 Single Cut. I played a first year run of that model that sustained for days. Fit and finish were amazing.
     
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  9. Chicago Slim

    Chicago Slim Member

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    I've owned an SE 245 and found that I did like it better than a Les Paul. I then tried looking for a better version, in a Bernie Marsden and Zach Myers. I found that I liked the sound of a light weigh Zach Myers, even better. I sold the SE 245, kept the Zach Myers and bought an S2 Singlecut Semi-Hollow. The S2 is nicer, but the Zach Myers is closer to a Les Paul (or chambered LP). YMMV.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018 at 7:03 AM
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  10. snakestretcher

    snakestretcher Member

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    Bear in mind that there are (were) two versions of the SE 245; the Standard (no maple cap), and the maple veneered model. Whether that veneer has any bearing on tone I couldn't tell you, but the Standard is a bit less expensive. I believe it is discontinued now but there are bound to be loads around still.
     
  11. johnh

    johnh Silver Supporting Member

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    I sold my SE245 because it was a little too heavy for me, but it was not at all heavy by LP standards. Which I totally accept that there are tonal differences SE245 and a LP, playing mine was a very Les Paul-like experience. The tones were very similar, as was the feel.
     
  12. 9fingers

    9fingers Supporting Member

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    I have that same "vintage burst" Zach. With the stock pickups and electronics it cops the sound of my chambered Gibson LP with fancy pots (500K of course) PIO caps & Seth Lover pickups very closely, and the Zach is way more comfortable to play. I got the Zach with the intention of redoing the electronics & replacing the pickups, but have found no need to change things, except to add treble bleeds to the volume pots. Great guitar with the best feeling neck I have played. Sustain is similar to my LP.
     
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  13. Chicago Slim

    Chicago Slim Member

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    I had a SE 245 and was looking at similar models, all with 245 pickups. I played a Bernie Marsden and three Zach Myers. I found that weight, made a big difference in sound. I liked the sound of the lightest guitar. The OP might prefer the sound of the heaviest guitar, due to sustain. They were all good guitars. But sound, is a personal choice.
     
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  14. Pointy Headstock

    Pointy Headstock Member

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    I owned an SE245 for a bit and ended up selling it and moving on to an ESP EC1000T (for almost a straight trade). I'm not a fan of the stock SE pickups (I swapped them to 36th Anniversaries and was a lot happier). I also just barely get along with the Gibson scale length and found that the ever so minuscule difference in the SE neck scale had a really big not so good impact on the feel to me. Good sounding, good quality, great bang for your buck guitar though.
     
  15. Riffzilla

    Riffzilla Member

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    Just went and played a few. The Bernie was awesome, love the satin feel of the neck and even though it's meant to be a wide fat (I think?) It felt different to the SE245. Didn't like the wide fat neck profile on any of the other SE so I guess that rules them all out for me!

    Had a go on an LTD EC1000 and thought it felt awesome. Surprisingly really liked the thin U neck so I'm looking at these as well now. Didn't think it sounded anywhere near as lively or resonant as the Bernie though.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018 at 6:36 AM
  16. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    You might have trouble finding one to play in person, but the Chris Robertson SE has the wide/fat profile. It also has a P90 in the neck position and a 57/08 "S" at the bridge. And four knobs. Right up my alley; I've had my eye on that one for an SE singlecut.

    PS: It's described as being derived from the 245 design.
     

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