PRS Singlecut Trem

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by keith_t4e, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. keith_t4e

    keith_t4e Member

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    I've been seriously considering getting a PRS. After speaking with two dealers whom I trust, I've come to the conclusion that the single cut trem would be the best model for me. They have a new pickup instead of the HFS, Dragon or Mcarty. The trem on the single cut is cool. The finishes on PRS even on non ten tops look great to me especially sunburst finishes. Who here has had good experiences with PRS? What do they sound like? I was thinking of getting the SG 61. I would like to have at least one guitar with a usable tremolo. How do the wide fat necks play? I do not like huge necks.
     
  2. dzeitlin

    dzeitlin Member

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    I had an SCT for a while, and to my ears, it was too thin and bright. The Wide Fat neck isn't too large, maybe slightly bigger than Gibson's 60 slim taper. PRSi in general have amazing playability, and the PRS trem is great. Very fluid, and great return to pitch. I guess you could replace the pickups if you feel they are not right, but I think the construction was the main reason for the brightness.
     
  3. Ironman

    Ironman Member

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    The Singlecut Trem won't get you into LP territory if you're looking for fat honking tones. I found it kind of bland sounding, not ballsy, not sweet, just bright and thin with a hardness to the sound that wasn't very pleasing to me. Changing pickups out might help there, not sure though. The wide fat on it wasn't chunky enough for me either, it seemed really slim, slimmer than a couple of Singlecuts I used to have which I couldn't figure out. You might like that about it.

    Man, if you're looking for a nice fat LP toned guitar with a trem, I'd consider Tom Anderson's Cobra or Atom. They come a lot closer to getting that nice fat growling midrange of a LP...imho.
     
  4. wheelman

    wheelman Member

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    I hear that hardness with alot of newer PRS's. Mine had a huge bottom end. I had the bridge blocked not sure if that was the reason, or the fact that I was using one of them early dual rectifiers. The sg will probally have a much slimmer neck.
     
  5. wilder

    wilder Member

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    Just to offer a contrasting opinion, the SCT I have compares favoarably with my R7. It doesn't quite have the ass of the R7, but it does offer a lot more versatility with the coil-splitting options.
     
  6. keith_t4e

    keith_t4e Member

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    That is why I don't have one yet. Every time I get up to about 15 or 16 hundred bucks I start thinking for a couple hundred more I could have a Goldtop or plaintop Custom Sho Les Paul.
     
  7. Crunchyriff

    Crunchyriff Member

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    FWIW, the last Singelcut I played before the Gibson lawsuit had a baseball bat neck. Fatter than my '01 R8 Lester (and it's quite girthy)
     
  8. Crunchyriff

    Crunchyriff Member

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    FWIW, the last Singelcut I played before th eGibson lawsuit had a baseball bat neck. Fatter than my '01 R8 LPr (and it's quite girthy)
    It still lacked the tone of a good lester.
     
  9. Lucidology

    Lucidology Member

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    While Wide Fat necks on PRS's are certainly managable with small hands
    ... their standard and wide thin necks are much better...

    However, having had all three PRS types before.. plus having small hands.. I will say that the bigger necks, for some reason, seem to faciliate bending a little easier...
     
  10. JimmyR

    JimmyR Member

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    BTW it's not all that easy to swap pickups in a PRS. The pickup rout isn't deep enough for most aftermarket pickups IME.
     
  11. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

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    Very true when you have a pup with the long "vintage" dog ears like a Duncan 59 or Seth Lover. The more modern pups have short ears like the JB and Jazz. I bet many maufacturers can hook you up with a short ear version if you need it.
     
  12. Jim S

    Jim S Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

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  13. Berlin Chris

    Berlin Chris Member

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    Hmmmm,

    these comments about a too bright and brittle sound and the singlecut Trem not being a Les Paul got me thinking.

    I mean, it may remotely *LOOK* like a LP, but it is a completely different animal. The trem, the body thickness, the headstock angle, the overall PRS-feel and everything. It sure is brighter than a Gibson LP, but I guess that is exactly what it is supposed to be. And that´s great if you are after a more "modern" sound with the added capabilities of coil-switching and a great working tremolo.

    No offense or anything, but these comments always sound a bit anti-PRS. As if a PRS is not a decent guitar or anything.

    You want a Les Paul? Go buy a Gibson or Heritage or whatnot. You want something different but with the visual aspects of a nice Les Paul? Have a look at differently constructed guitars, the PRS SC trem being one option. And a good one at that...

    Again this is not meant to offend anybody, but I just get tired of these "it is not a Les Paul" comments whenever a PRS-question comes up.

    just my 2 cent
     
  14. Troubleman

    Troubleman Silver Supporting Member

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    What amazed (and disappointed) me about the single cut trem vs the single cut hard-tail was the loss of bottom end and fatness in its tone. The single cut hard-tails I've tried have had massive bottom end chunk. The single cut trems are closer to Fenderish. I was hoping for the single cut hard-tail, only with a trem. Such has not been the case in the ones I've tried....

    Peace,

    jb
     
  15. Jim S

    Jim S Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I bumped the thread because I have my eye on a gorgeous SC Trem but the majority of comments have been negative.

    Of course on BaM and The Les Paul Forum the comments are nearly polar opposites but I figure TGP is neutral ground.

    (I guess I should have the SCT shipped and give it a try. I have a Les Paul and '89 PRS Cu 24. Arsenal is in link below.)
     
  16. rooster

    rooster Member

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    I don't have a Singlecut, but I do have an old '87 Custom, and the way I'd describe it would be the best SG sound I've ever heard (my first 2 guitars were SG's). It does that in spades, but can't do the LP. I use my Heritage H150's for that, but they're harder to play than a Singlecut, since they're designed with the same neck/cutaway profile as a LP.

    rooster.
     
  17. BIGGERSTAFF

    BIGGERSTAFF Member

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    Another option if you want a single cut guitar with trem, is a McInturff Taurus T(or Sportster T). Get some Wolfetones, WCRs, Voodoos, Lollars, TOLs, etc..
    and you'll have a fantastic instrument, with good low end.
     
  18. DanielT2

    DanielT2 Member

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    For those saying there's a big difference between the sound of the SC Trem and SC, keep in mind the SC Trem has a far thinner mahogany body but a thicker maple cap than the Stop Tail SC. The stop tail SC has a thicker mahogany back but thinner maple cap. The body width is something you'll see when you play both guitars. The thinner maple cap on the SC Stoptail was reported in a magazine review so I assume this is correct.

    It would make sense that a thinner guitar with a thicker maple cap and a trem (the SC Trem) would give a brighter, more "Fender-like" tone.

    Likewise, the SC Stoptail, with thicker mahog. body and thinner maple cap will provide a deeper, more bassy tone.

    Also, the pickups on the two guitars are different. The SC Stop-tail has No. 7's, the SC Trem has No. 6's. The pickup specs are at http://www.prsguitars.com/pickups/index.html
     
  19. Jim S

    Jim S Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    PRS #6 Treble: This is similar in sound to our PRS #7 but without the cover and is again a result of our tweaking. Clear and well balanced across the entire tonal spectrum, this pickup is very alive and sounds excellent distorted.

    PRS #7 Treble: This may be one of the best treble pickups we make. It’s powerful and clear with vintage alive characteristics. It is also used on stage by many touring bands.

    PRS #6 Bass: Clear, warm and extremely well balanced across the entire tonal spectrum.

    PRS #7 Bass: It is a full range pickup with vintage alive characteristics. It is also highly recommended and used on stage by many touring bands
     
  20. Stringkiller

    Stringkiller Member

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    Wow - a lot of comments were very uncomplementary about the PRS Single Cut Trem. There were a lot of comments I agree with - if you want an LP tone or an SG tone go get an LP or an SG.

    I wanted a guitar that was lighter than my LPs and that could deliver a wide spectrum of clean , crunch and overdrive sounds and stand out in recording or live shows.
    I finally found a SCTrem last year (a 2006 model - black- moons) which has far exceeded my expectations. It's probably become my n° 1 guitar. I say probably as I have one or two other very nice guitars - you understand - ehehe ;-)

    Wide fat neck - confortable to play, stays in tune, no bend outs anywhere on the neck and no dead spots - the neck responds at all times in all positions. Comfortable even after a long 4 hour gig.

    Great pickups - a Tone switch that actually does something between 0 and 5 and some other things between 5 and 7 and 7 and 9 and 9 and 10 unlike a lot of other humbuckers (see I did not say LP eheh).
    The same with the volume control. More importantly once you pull up the tone control you get a great single coil sound (different and for me, better than 2 and 4 on my PRS Custom 24)with a lot of tonal possibilities from the effective vol and tone pots.

    A nice light guitar with a large palette of sounds.
    Locking tuners for quick and easy string changes and no staying in tune problems.
    What else - a working tremelo - I'm now thinking of deblocking one of my Strats.

    The PRS SCTrem sounds great through most tube amps - I use either a Koch Studiotone in small clubs and a Koch Twintone in larger venues. Check them out.

    Hope this helps.
    Stringkiller
     

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