PSA: If you've tried but just don't "get" Frank Zappa

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by micycle, Nov 24, 2015.

  1. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Member

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    Yeah she's a gem. Digs old Rush too. And she's a huge Steve Howe era Yes fan. There are other things she likes that mainstream women tend to not dig so much too, but we won't get into that here. :)
     
  2. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Member

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    Fair enough. My only point was the juvenile-ish humor on Yellow Snow really isn't the depth of it. Sometimes his humor was pretty intellectual. And as someone else pointed out it was very social and yes, cynical too. I thought maybe you hadn't heard Joe's Garage. Cyborg, Catholic Girls, Crew Slut, Central Scrutinizer, etc..
     
  3. fishleehooker

    fishleehooker Supporting Member

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    Yup. I've been to the weddings. Just wait for the cha-cha slide to start up and act into it to impress most of them. If my wife had her way, we'd listen to the night-before's The Voice for entertainment/ music.
     
  4. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    I would recommend the Apostrophe/ over-nite sensation album documentary, I watched it a while back, it was really good!
    The Freakout list is good too.
    I was on some FZ documentary binges a while back!
     
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  5. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    There is also this I watched not too long ago:
    “Frank Zappa - Freak Jazz Movie Madness & Another Mothers”
    it was also good and informative
     
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  6. frijoleghost

    frijoleghost Supporting Member

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    i understand my 78 year old mother in law has recently gotten into frank zappa...god bless her
     
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  7. tymj2112

    tymj2112 Member

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    I never saw Frank, but I have seen Dweezil on several Zappa Plays Zappa tours and the Roxy and Elsewhere show a few years back was AMAZING. Shout out to Sheila Gonzales in the ZPZ band - she is phenomenal!
     
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  8. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    I got to see the Roxy line up. Frank said that by the time that tour was over the band could play the material at blazing speed. He also mentioned that is was one of his favorite ensembles.

    I never missed a Zappa tour starting with the Petite Wazoo band. Jim Gordon was on drums for that tour.

    The band on his last tour were incredible players. It was so good I went again the next night. Too bad that band fell apart
     
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  9. karmadave

    karmadave Supporting Member

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    As you can see from my avatar FZ is one of my musical hero’s. I saw him live twice and would have many more times had he not left us. Frank was a musical genius, but his music didn’t appeal to everyone. Taste is subjective :)
     
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  10. megawzrd

    megawzrd Supporting Member

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    Nice. Looks lime it is currently on Amazon streaming.

    Although not sure what the difference is between the two offerings. One titled 'Live at the Roxy' (currently prime streaming) and one titled 'Roxy the Movie'. Both same running length and same title cover. Slightly different descriptions.

    Watching the Prime one now. Love this era/band! The footage is great!
     
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  11. BriSol

    BriSol Member

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    I remember getting into Zappa heavily as a teen and my friends seemed to despise it/him, with one exception. Later in life it seems like he's actually a better bet than most others that are "prog related" that friends might appreciate him at some level. He has a good chunk of music that is vocal rather than instrumental, which can help hook listeners in better than instrumental stuff, and the humor can be more endearing to some people than seriousness can. I have a much easier time getting people to recognize and appriciate Zappa than I do with instrumental fusion artists.
     
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  12. jms6668

    jms6668 Member

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    Love Zappa's music... now. But as a teen, I just didn't find the humor that funny. To be honest, I still don't, but it doesn't bother me so much these days I'm too busy listening in awe of the writing and playing.

    There is a part of it that still makes me think of that friend that thinks he's a comedian but you just don't share the same tastes in humor. You just politely fake a laugh and it keep it moving.

    Yes, that Roxy video is amazing.
     
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  13. ZeyerGTR

    ZeyerGTR Member

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    I never really got Zappa until I read a biography of his about 10 years ago, the light bulb went for me then. The eclectic blend of styles, how that manifests in his music, the angle his humor comes from.. knowing more about those things and his history put the "out there" nature of some his stuff in context. It also sparked my interest enough to give it more and deeper listening, when I could really enjoy it. I love Zappa now.

    That's happened occasionally with other artists as well, even on a song-by-song scale. It dawned on me the other day that this is a big reason that I tend to listen to more new music I read about in magazines or artists' biographies, as opposed to just following random links on internet threads. Knowing just a little bit about an artist or a song or an album helps me sort through the dense cloud of music that's out there.
     
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  14. Solarflares

    Solarflares Member

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    A woman’s back makes a damn-good laptop workstation.
     
  15. Solarflares

    Solarflares Member

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    To sit in front of a pair of Tannoy System 12 DMT’s , with a Bryston 4BSST power-amp fed by a high-quality soundcard - listening to the sleazy trombone solo on Greggary Peccary , or blasting out Regyptian Strut at mind-numbing volume - remains a pure joy.

    I had every album up to Mothers of Prevention.
    I have had occasion to listen to the whole collection of 64 albums back to back. Takes about 3 days.

    Back in ‘82 , me and a mate went shopping with our welfare cheques , and I found “You Are What You Is” in W.H.Smiths ffs! His girlfriend at the time had green shoes , unkempt black hair , and wore loose-fitting black dresses constantly.
    We got home , had a good roast dinner - and I put the album on.
    And then “Goblin Girl” came on!!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
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  16. stanshall

    stanshall Member

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    I remember one time my brother and I had put on a Zappa album in the house and our mom heard it and said "There's something seriously wrong with that man!" ... we have never stopped laughing about that ... she said those exact words when she heard "Manic Mechanic" by ZZ Top too

    hahaha she loved Neil Young and the Grateful Dead and the Beatles but couldn't bear to hear a note of Led Zeppelin or Bob Dylan

    personally I've loved his music since I was very young and heard Willie the Pimp on vinyl when it was new and thought the Hot Rats cover was one of the freakiest things I'd ever seen

    first one I actually bought for myself was One Size Fits All at age 13, spent a year listening to San Berdino, Can't Afford No Shoes, and Inca Roads before I even got to the rest of the album, by which time I was way into Bongo Fury and Muffin Man, and Overnite Sensation and Apostrophe ... all the rest followed, new ones fast and furiously and older ones when I could find them

    Zoot Allures slayed me, Zappa in New York, Sheik Yerbouti, these hit at just the right time for me

    the whole eccentric Zappa universe has given me so much pleasure over the years ....

    used to comb YouTube for clips of the George Duke-era band playing in Europe, went to see Baby Snakes in the theater when it came out, made myself watch 200 Motels, bought the books Viva Zappa! by Dominique Chevalier, The Real Frank Zappa Book, and the masterpiece The Negative Dialectics of Poodle Play

    really want to see these documentaries discussed above

    had the good fortune to meet some of the more currently approved family members recently socially and look forward to more of this when the dust blows back

    arf
     
  17. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    I have his entire collection except a few "best of's" and some posthumous stuff.

    One summer I decided to listen to them all in chronological order. While there is good stuff on every release, the musicianship, production, writing, technology culminated in the "One Size Fits All" release. Makes sense considering it's mostly the Roxie band after their tour.

    Once Aynsley Dunbar joined the band, every great drummer wanted to play with FZ. Nothing against Jimmy Carl Black, however the subsequent drummers were far better.

    His "Civilization Phaze III" is a piece of work. I don't get why it doesn't get higher acclaim.

    Since Frank has so much output it shouldn't be too hard to find some tunes folks will at least appreciate. There is plenty of material where he isn't inserting his humor. Some of his toilet humor doesn't knock me out.
     
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  18. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    Around 13 or 14 years old, which was 68 & 69, I must of heard him for the first time. Rueben and the Jets covers is Iconic and so is the Hot rats. It can't happen here, was my kinda tune, guys who could sing, singing out of tune on purpose. I thought Willie the pimps introduction to me was incredible. Some guys singing nasty, while singing nasty lyrics. So I listened to him, but not like him like other guitar players or bands I was into. So some 6 years later, I'm 19-20 and my buddy and I are going to see Todd Rundgren at the Forum. Zappa is head lining, w Dr John & Captain Beefheart. Details spared, Todd cancels, and we wanted to also, but, we went anyway. I didn't care for Dr John, Beefheart comes out with a Soparano Sax and raises it to the mike and blows loud, random notes, probably to stop any hot babes who thought they were gonna dance. I thought I was gonna cry, this was bad. I started to reassesses how potentially bad Zappa was going to be. And it is Dec 31st at the LA Forum and you had to step over vomit piles to get to the urinal. SO, that is the scene, And Frank hits the stage. First, I was bewildered by how tight the musicianship was. It was, don't take your eyes off this attention;demanded. After the first song, Napoleon Murphy, motors walks up to the mike and fake vomits. And the show took off from there. George Duke and I think Bozzio and I think Ruth was there.
    Anway I think I saw him 2 more times and of course seen Dweez a couple of times.
    Anyway my point is that seeing him live was the huge attraction, it brought a lot of us in. But Frank was amazing. if he wanted to make a serious dent in country music, you would have heard him on every Buck Owens owned radio station. Same goes for Classical and rock. Maybe we are lucky he stayed unconventional cutting edge. He could have out metaled anyone, yeah, he had Steve Vai when he was a skinny punk kid. You can't do this on stage anymore are great introduction to Frank when your driving down the road.
     
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  19. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    I bought this when it came out, it is an amazing work of music... what he was doing was probably light years ahead of most!!!
    I think the problem it it came out after he died, so he was no longer around to promote it.
    There are some phenomenal things on it for sure!!

    I think FZ knew that the music he really wanted to make had a small audience, and he had to make things that appealed to a broader public... and his humor and social commentary could do that!!! Plus making fun of the things your parents hate, doesn’t that appeal to most kids???
    I know the humor can be a turn off for many, but it you watch some of the documentaries about how he worked, and who he wanted in his band, it’s pretty amazing stuff!!!
    My 1st FZ album was shut up and play yer guitar, it was one of the 1st CDs I bought- still have it!!! I was on such a small budget in the 80s, I bought: ship arriving too late, Tinseltown rebellion from cut out bins. I played those albums constantly!!!! Got them or us and Broadway the hardest on cassette!!! Bought Guitar on CD!!! A friend loaned me hot rats, we’re only in it for the money, and Filmore East, I listened to all of these constantly in the 80s and 90s....

     
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  20. Tony-Cliffton

    Tony-Cliffton Member

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    Saw him in 88. The only time I got see him before he passed away.
    Fantastic show.
    In the documentary “Echo In The Canyon” Stephen Stills tells an awesome story about his then neighbor, Frank Zappa, standing in the street reciting the lyrics to “Who Are The Brain Police”.
    I miss frank.
     
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