Pub appropriate. Keg faucet question.

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by highrise, Mar 27, 2015.

  1. highrise

    highrise Member

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    I'm a home brewer. I keg my beer.

    In my garage I have a chest freezer I converted to a kegerator...but I haven't installed taps.

    I don't think I'm going to. I don't like the thought of my warm garage having beer sitting out...and that being the first beer into my mug.

    I prefer to use "party faucets"...the cheap black plastic kind...and I just coil the beer line and faucet on the keg and it stays chilled in the kegerator.

    BUT...those plastic faucets are junk. They fall apart and bend and they're just junk.


    DOES ANYONE know of a place which sells METAL party faucets? Or something which will accept standard beer line securely?
     
  2. JMC

    JMC Member

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    I have a kegerator in my garage, in the Texas heat. Works fine.
     
  3. BrewDrinkRepeat

    BrewDrinkRepeat Member

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    A. If you're going to stick with the party taps, then just use the plastic ones. If you clean your lines and taps regularly (and you should, after every keg change!) they will actually last a long time. I used them for years (same set) before I built a collar for my chest freezer and installed taps.

    B. If you do build a collar and install taps, spring for Perlicks. They are not that much more money, but are superior to the other kind.

    C. When using faucets, no beer is "sitting out." Only the tiny amount of beer that is immediately behind the faucet will get even slightly warmer than the beer in the line or in the keg, and you should not notice it in the glass. (This of course assumes that your collar is insulated, which it should be!) This really is a non-issue, but if you're really concerned about it you pour a quick ounce or two and dump it before pouring a pint (if you haven't poured anything for some time, many hours or more).

    D. Be sure to put a couple of EvaDry units in there, and a fan, to cut down on the condensation.
     

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