Pulling out Nashville studs

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by vortexxxx, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. vortexxxx

    vortexxxx Member

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    I'm switching one of my guitars that came with a Nashville bridge to a ABR-1 with conversion posts. I only have 2 guitars with Nashville bridges, so I don't have any experience with this. I'm wondering, do I just pull out the studs, or should I do something to keep the paint around the studs from chipping as I pull them out?
     
  2. ultra

    ultra Member

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    Are you using Faber conversion posts by any chance? They supply an 8mm bolt which you screw into the Nashville collars and as you tighten the bolt, the collars ease out.

    From my experience, the Nashville collars are inserted after the top is finished with lacquer. There should be no bridging of lacquer around the collar and it should ease out leaving the finish in place.
     
  3. vortexxxx

    vortexxxx Member

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    I ended up getting a Callaham one. I always wanted to try their bridges. I wonder why Gibson still uses Nashville bridges. With CNC, the holes for the bridge should be in the perfect position, so you wouldn't need saddles that have that much travel.

    It's this one:

    [​IMG]

    From their site:

    "[SIZE=-1]This assembly is for Gibson's that use the 2 piece insert / thumbwheel combination for mounting. Late 70's Gibson's and early 80's Gibsons had ABR's with Nashville stud mounting. All "Nashville" bridges use this mounting. Our 1 piece studs replaces the factory 2 piece stud assembly."[/SIZE]
     
  4. Rod

    Rod Tone is Paramount Silver Supporting Member

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    Vortexxx. I'd love to know your thoughts on the difference in highs and tone the Callaham bridge makes (if any) after you install it.... Been thinking about one myself, except they are pricey!
     
  5. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    Some people like the Nashville. I'm one of them. It's got more travel, as you say, but it's not useful because the bridge is in the wrong place; it's useful because not everyone uses the same string gauges or tunes to the same pitch. It won't rattle. The saddles don't fall out, and it has no wire to come loose and buzz.

    It's not perfect, the width can cause problems with string angle to the tailpiece...but it's got a lot of things going for it.
     
  6. bunny

    bunny Member

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    If you still decide to pull the studs, use the TOM posts or bolts with the same tread and a simple fixture made of a plastic (brass, wooden) tubing and washers to pull the studs by tightening the bolts into them. A plastic (nylon) washer placed under the metal tubing is the best to save the finish. You may also use a soldering iron and heat the studs moderately to help them go out easily.
    Note that on Gibsons the ground wire may be connected to the bridge post or to the tailpiece post, make sure you have your strings grounded after you change the bridge.
     
  7. oldlefty

    oldlefty Member

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    I put a Callaham in my wolf/SG build, but since it wasn't a swap I have nothing to compare it to. I can say that the guitar has excellent articulation and sustain, but some of that is the maple/purpleheart and the brass nut I'm sure.
     
  8. vortexxxx

    vortexxxx Member

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    I ended up swapping pickups at the same time, so I can't say if the sound quality is more due to the pickups or to the bridge.
     

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