Question for Budda owners...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by kingsxman, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. kingsxman

    kingsxman Silver Supporting Member

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    I got my new Budda Super Drive 30 a month ago. Gigged once. I'm noticing that this thing puts out some serious heat! The metal plug on the speaker cord is actually pretty warm to the touch after a practice of a gig. Is this normal for all Budda's or just the SD30? Will this kind of heat shorten tube life considerably?

    I only gig 2 x a month so I'm not too worried about tube life..more curious than anything.

    BY the way...what a great amp! THis thing has the best overdrive sound I've just about ever heard. Almost a "plexi" sound with the drive at about 9:00. THen, bring the drive to about 1:00 and your in Brown Sound heaven. Just thick with no hint of "buzzyness" that I had with other Marshalls or other amps. Clean is warm..yet has a nice bite to it. Love it so far.
     
  2. jeffh

    jeffh Silver Supporting Member

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    I have series I SD 30, it runs very hot as well.
     
  3. lgehrig4

    lgehrig4 Silver Supporting Member

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    Mine as well. I just asked the same question yesterday.
     
  4. Ricker

    Ricker Member

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    Yeah
    sd30s get damn hot bro.
    The sd30 doubles up as a heater in winter.........he he he

    Rick
     
  5. kingsxman

    kingsxman Silver Supporting Member

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    Ricker, you own a few Budda amps. Is it all the Budda's or is this something specifically about the SD30? Do you feel this could effect its reliability?
     
  6. Ricker

    Ricker Member

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    Well I don't have the sd30 anymore........but my sd80 doesn't get nearly as hot.......It warms up pretty good after a gig but not like the 30.
    I've got a Koch multitone that gets hot to the touch on the front metal plate too..............so I guess some amp by design just get hotter.................not sure if this could be a reliability issue..........Jeff at Budda doesn't seem to think so.

    Rick
     
  7. grism

    grism Member

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    A good amp tech should be able to install a cooling fan to blow cool air across the tubes and out of the back of the cabinet. I had this mod performed on my classic 20. Before the fan the classic 20 would almost get hot enough to fry an egg or two. After the mod the chassis doesn't even get warm. It made an astounding difference.
     
  8. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    The SD30 gets super hot. Plus I think it's part of the nature of those tubes, but I don't know for sure.

    The SD80 has a fan built into it.
     
  9. kingsxman

    kingsxman Silver Supporting Member

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    I would think that Jeff @ Budda would have put a fan in if it needed it when they did the redesign.

    So, it sounds like it hasnt crapped out for anyone yet..so I'm probably ok.
     
  10. teefus

    teefus Silver Supporting Member

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    put a weber copper cap in there instead of the tube rectifier. should save you some btu's. i use done in my superdrive 18 II and it worked great. i just got one by fedex today for my valvetech hayseed custom.
     
  11. kingsxman

    kingsxman Silver Supporting Member

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    Whats a weber copper cap?> Never heard of them. Whats the purpose?
     
  12. teefus

    teefus Silver Supporting Member

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    it's a device to replace and simulate the effects (sag, etc) of a rectifier tube. it is a bunch of electronic stuff in a copper tube and it plugs into the rectifier socket. never wears out, no heat and it looks cool. ted makes them in all shapes and sizes for most applications.
     
  13. mikeyjake

    mikeyjake Member

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    Buddas have aluminum chassis (like many vintage) for tone purposes. They are a bit more expensive, and they run hotter.

    You gotta get that tone somehow.

    I've done a few hundred gigs with just a 1x12" SD30, and never had any reliability problems.
     
  14. mikeyjake

    mikeyjake Member

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    BTW, the guys at BUDDA said to *NEVER* use a solid state rectifier replacement. It could hurt the amp because of the voltages it runs at.
     
  15. LesPaulPlayer

    LesPaulPlayer Member

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    Jeff Bober says that the aluminum chassis is a conductor of heat and that it's normal for the amp to get hot. My 18 watt budda (only two EL84's) can get so hot that I can hardly touch the chassis face plates. Even the chassis screws get warm. Although the amp has been reliable, it does eat up the power tubes in about 6 months, an indication that the amp runs at very high voltages. It just starts sounding soft and becomes noisy. A price to pay for the tone, I suppose, and even their website suggests power tube replacement every six months, so the amp is operating as designed.

    Jeff also informed me that only the stock rectifier type should be used because the amp is run right up to the voltage limit with the stock rectifier. The copper cap is supposed to replicate the current drop of the tube rectifier it's mimicing so I don't think it would hurt the amp. That being said, I wouldn't put one in my Budda since the stock Sovtek 5U4G has been reliable.

    Everyone has their preferences, and I prefer the stock Sovtek EL84's and stock Sovtek 12AX7WB in the first gain stage for tone and reliability in my amp. I've tried virtually all the currently made stuff and I come back to the stock, so-called "cheapo" tubes. :eek: Funny. I'm glad that I like the cheaper tubes since this amp requires frequent replacing!
     
  16. teefus

    teefus Silver Supporting Member

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    i don't think the weber copper cap acts like a solid state rectifier. it emulates sag and there are many models to fit your current (pun intended) needs. i used one in my sb18II for quite some time and no problems. current (pun intended) manufacture rect tubes (russian, slavik and chinese) have not fared well over time it seems.
     
  17. mikeyjake

    mikeyjake Member

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    The guy who built the amp said it himself...

    And I think, if I remember correctly, he was answering on a post about the Weber's.

    So, do it at your own risk (and I don't think you're just risking tubes at that point).

    I've been running with the same rectifier tube for years now.. the one the amp came with.
     
  18. CrossHair

    CrossHair Member

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  19. teefus

    teefus Silver Supporting Member

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    if it passes the same current and sags like the tube, what's the difference?
     
  20. mikeyjake

    mikeyjake Member

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