Question for guys that use loopers.

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by dangeroso, May 23, 2011.

  1. dangeroso

    dangeroso Member

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    I’ve owned a Boss RC20XL and I’ve owned a Boomerang Version 1, and while both are very cool, I can’t seem to get over the fact that the looping signal and the new live signal seem to always be competing with each other for sonic bandwidth.

    Unless I start a loop with one amp, and then plug into another amp, I always have an issue with both signals sounding very muddy together.

    Do others not experience this, or is it just part of the accepted trade off for being able to loop a signal?
     
  2. JackStraw12

    JackStraw12 Supporting Member

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    I run a stereo out of my board sometimes, in which case I run the looper in the effects loop of one and adjust the level accordingly. The main reason that I love my 'Rang over other loopers I've tried is the treadle which allows me to change the loop's volume. I hope that helps.
     
  3. dangeroso

    dangeroso Member

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    I have used the volume on the Boomerang as well, but it’s more of a frequency clash than a volume problem for me. The sound of 2 signals competing for the same frequency band is what I think I am hearing.
     
  4. JackStraw12

    JackStraw12 Supporting Member

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    On the 'Rang plus, I sometimes use the Aux out and run it to a speaker next to my amp. I doubt that it would run a 2x12 or something, but a little PA monitor is fine. Does that help? Scofield and Trey Anastasio use the Boomerang, among others, and I am curious to know how they would attach this particular situation.

    Alternatively, this is how I'd run it if I had two amps. Guitar > Pedal board w/ stereo delay R > Amp A (main guitar tones)

    Stereo delay L > Amp B EFX out > Boomerang > EFX In

    I know that these guys are pretty bad tone suckers and are noisy, and I found that this was the best way to combat that issue by sticking them in an effects loop I can turn on and off. Great looper though, dumbass proof!
     
  5. the 5cientist

    the 5cientist Member

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    my solution is that i use a slightly eq'd setting for my boost, to allow it to cut through.

    on acoustic, i simply use the TREX twin-boost, and have one level set slightly higher for lead with a pick, and the second level set a fair bit higher for any fingerpicking leads i want to to.

    on the EQ of each boosts I just cut the lows slightly and boost the mids a little (or whatever depending on your needs) and it works very well for me.

    I actually like the fact that the loop sounds blend in to each other a bit, to me it sounds fuller, and less like there are '2 instruments playing' if you know what i mean...

    on a side note, i love using my boss oc-3 super octave on loops on the 'poly' mode... great pedal for acoustic.
     
  6. triviani

    triviani Silver Supporting Member

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    I understand it, I have sometimes the same "problem", it can be confusing to listen different parts on the same amp. I use 2 amps when possible, and the stereo out of the boomerang iii so the loop goes to an amp and the playing to other.

    Also, pickups on my guitar are quite different, so I use that a lot to differentiate parts, solos..
     

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