question for vintage guitar buyers...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by redtoploader, May 21, 2008.

  1. redtoploader

    redtoploader Member

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    ...How do you come up with the coin? Serious question. Do you take a loan? Save slowly? Trades?

    Just wondering how someone goes about investing in one, especially the more experienced guys out there.
     
  2. RJM/rydog2223

    RJM/rydog2223 Member

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    Good question. Every time I bring up the idea of it(as investment of course; ) ) to the wife she gives me the laser beams! BTW where are ya at in our great state??
     
  3. Dotneck

    Dotneck Member

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    I usually just sell one of my yaughts when I get low on cash....that way I can afford to buy anything I want without withdrawing money from my investments. I think I may sell the one I keep at the Greek Isles this year...I'm tired of souvlaki anyway....
     
  4. MartinPiana

    MartinPiana Supporting Member

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    I'm close to one high-end collector. For him, money is not an issue.
     
  5. redtoploader

    redtoploader Member

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    Hey ry, i'm on WI's west coast, grew up in the Milwaukee area.

    This is also a subject I may be discussing with the wife soon. But its not like we have that kind of cash lying around...but since the market is kinda soft now, it seems like it might be a good time to buy.

    Also..is there specific insurance any of you guys use?
     
  6. FloridaSam

    FloridaSam Member

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  7. Jahn

    Jahn Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver Supporting Member

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    Recently I've found the best way to go is shop consignment. No hassle and you are guaranteed a certain amount (as long as you're willing to be a bit patient).
     
  8. RJM/rydog2223

    RJM/rydog2223 Member

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    Cool I grew up in Fondy but now I'm in Point. My thoughts exactly as far as the market goes. Now would be a good time to buy. I have been bringing the idea up more often lately to the wife but like you we just don't have the cash. Most of it goes in the fuel tank!:puh
     
  9. rays44

    rays44 Member

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    It was always difficult, but it's crazy now. Six years ago a nice clean '50's jr. was around 2k. Alot of money to be sure, but not unobtainable. Now the same guitar is 8k. I always had luck with "issue" guitars ie, refins, changed parts, etc which are always priced WAY below the nice clean original pieces. I'm out of vintage game because I just don't see the value in these guitars anymore. The average guy looking to get into a '50's Gibson or Fender dosen't have a prayer anymore unless there are major issues. Even then, you're into 5 figures. Too bad.
     
  10. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    If you're talking Scott Chinery types, they just have (or in his case, had) a bottomless barrel of cash. Me, while I have no fifties strats or LPs, I have acquired a few nice pieces starting back when they were called "used gtrs". If something catches my eye, theres only one way for me to buy it: sell something. My rule is: one in, one out. It may be a buyer's market presently, but you are about 25 years too late.
     
  11. gixxerrock

    gixxerrock Member

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    I have a friend that has some amazing pieces and rents them out to top studios. He has had them for many years. In this market he is more apt to sell than buy, unless he stumbles on a killer deal. IMO, the smart collectors are the ones who have been systematically acquiring quality pieces at good prices for the past 20 years. The "collectors" with a big wad of cash buying their way into it now are the ones financing the bubble.

    I also have a friend who has an art collection that would shame many art galleries and museums. Same thing. It has been a lifelong pursuit. He has a great eye, knows a lot of artists and gets great deals on art that is under the radar (ie. the artist is still alive ;) ).
     
  12. greuvin

    greuvin Member

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    Investing in anything takes time and discipline. Even though vintage guits are perceived to be at a high mark, there is nothing to suggest they will ever cease appreciating. At the moment, other factors have entered into the curve such as $135/barrel crude and the "credit crunch". This will pass eventually, as everything always does. It is the Bush kiss off. He is allowing all his oil buddies to rape America. It happens anytime a president leaves office but this time it is really more of an "in your face" situation. Disgusting and reprehensible behavior, but that is just reality. Don't let these jerk-offs cloud your judgement.

    Old lacquer covered wood equals better tone. Period! The laws of physics will always apply here. Buy the 80's Gibsons to get started. Once you have some nice ones, you can sell some of those and move to the 70's. Wash, rinse, repeat. You get the idea. Point is, you have to start somewhere. I'd also recommend the late 90's Gibsons (both Historic and Standard production). Don't buy any "issues" guitars if you can help it. Keep with clean and original. You can't get hurt this way.

    How to afford the first few may take some time. Just do it. It is a journey of knowledge and gratification. You'll meet some really cool people. A totally worth-while experience (IMHO).
     
  13. stratotonedude

    stratotonedude Senior Member

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    Just about every guitar I buy is forty to fifty years old. A majority of them- Danelectros, Supros, Nationals- are not that expensive. I usually have that much in my bank account, credit card, or Paypal card.

    I buy alot of guitars though. And I sell quite a few too. Usually when it is a relatively high dollar item like my 1960 ES-330 or 1974 Les Paul Deluxe I just sell off a few guitars that will be made superflous once I obtain that particular guitar. It is a way to keep my collection in check so my music room doesn't turn into a hoarding situation.
     
  14. zenfreud

    zenfreud Member

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    That sounds like me, too. In the past I liked looking for good deals on refin'd and/or modded Fenders. The high-end collectors weren't interested in them so the guitars were relative bargains and they could in theory play just as well as the top-dollar trophy guitars. But given the sky-high cost of even the modded/refins today, I can no longer justify buying one, especially given how good some of the newer Fenders are.

    To answer the OP's question, I think somebody would have to be very brave or crazy to be considering a collectible guitar purchase if he or she couldn't just spring for it out of pocket.
     
  15. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    THe only way I've gotten the stuff I have is 'right place at the right time' luck, and a couple of OCD years scouring craigslist, pawn shops, estate sales, and classified ads. Buying, flipping, selling up, and eventually I parlayed a grand or two into much much more worth of gear.

    It's kind of a full time job though to go that route. But it works if you're patient and persistent.
     
  16. heady dude

    heady dude Member

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    I just rob banks....lots and lots of banks.
     
  17. playon

    playon Supporting Member

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    For people who are buying now, money is not an issue, or else they are selling another vintage piece to finance a new purchase. I was buying and selling vintage Martins for awhile, but I stopped when the guitars got so expensive that I had to take out a second mortgage to buy them... and it seemed like almost everyone calling was a CEO attorney, or stock market type, when just a few years prior it was mostly musicians. The fun went out of it for me, now I focus more on playing and gigging, so it was actually a postitive thing for me.

    I used to have a very nice small collection that I would actually play out, 50s Les Pauls, dot necks, 50s strats and teles, pre war Martins, etc that were purchased in the late 70s, 1980s and early 90s, but when they became so valuable I couldn't justify taking them to a gig I sold them all. The upside is that I'm focusing more on music and wasting much less on collectibles. I'm so over the whole vintage thing, especially with electrics -- with the fine parts you can buy nowadays you can make a new guitar sound and play 99% as good as the old stuff (or better), or have one custom made for a fraction of the cost. Screw it -- can provide my own "mojo" -- I don't need a guitar for that.
     

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