Question on Neck reset on vintage instrument

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by laflamme, Jan 24, 2008.

  1. laflamme

    laflamme Member

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    Hi,
    I have an old vintage guitar that has a set neck. It is a gibson les paul was made in the 1970's. The guitar is about as mint as one could get as the original owner only played it a handful of times. The glue joint from the body and neck has partially failed though. There is no damage other than the cracking on the joint and it has slightly separated. The neck is perfectly straight and angle with the body is still right on. Here is my question.

    I have taken the guitar to a well known luthier who says that I could either have the neck reset for $300.00-400.00 or have the joint injected with wood glue and clamped for $100.00. My question is, does a neck reset affect the value? I know if I have the joint injected then the finish on the guitar will not be at risk (other than the cracking at the body/neck joint). Which would be better to retain the value of the guitar?
     
  2. cochese

    cochese Supporting Member

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    Tough call. It might be best to call someone like Gruen guitars in TN or a vintage dealer. Of course just about all the Stadivarius violins have had their necks reset and they seem to hold their value.
     
  3. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    The best way to retain the value of a guitar is to retain the playability and structural stability of the guitar. Unless an instrument is more valuable as a decorative antique wall-hanger, it's worth getting it repaired right. Squeezing in glue and clamping is a quick fix that may or may not hold. If you want it to remain stable it's worth resetting the neck proper.
     
  4. rastus

    rastus Member

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    I agree with David-getting the job done right by a skilled luthier is the way to go, and most that have experience can reset a Lester so cleanly that you probably could not even see it.
     
  5. laflamme

    laflamme Member

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    Thanks Guys for the advice.
     
  6. MrMunky

    MrMunky Silver Supporting Member

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    I agree with the previous comments, but I would emphasize the importance of having someone reputable do the work. There are a lot of people out there who will agree to do this kind of work and do a second-rate job. It is difficult for a prospective buyer (particularly on eBay where he cannot inspect the instrument personally) to tell whether someone good or someone bad did the work. Better to spend the extra dough to have someone who is well known for good work do it.

    Your best bet might be to contact Gibson. They used to do this kind of repair work on their instruments. You will probably pay a premium, but in terms of maintaining value, you can't do better than being able to say that it was a factory repair.
     
  7. Yr Blues

    Yr Blues Member

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    There's a big difference between a guitar repair person and someone who specializes in vintage instruments. Most people can't tell, but the vintage specialist will listen to you, while the other will talk down to you. I made that mistake with a 1927 Martin parlor guitar. It was reset to modern specs and not vintage specs. He even cleaned off the patina for free, which totally devalued it further.
     

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