questions about Peavey Classic 20MH

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by still.ill, May 4, 2016.

  1. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    I've heard stuff before about Peavey Classic 30's hard to work on for amp techs for some reason--- does the 20 head also have the same problem?
     
  2. vbf

    vbf Supporting Member

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    I don't know about that, brother, but I'm really liking the Classic 20 MH.....terrific tones!!
     
  3. Coldcorner

    Coldcorner Supporting Member

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    I was just going to start a thread on people's opinions on this and the Valveking mini. What's the real tonal differences between the two?
     
  4. B Money

    B Money Member

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    bump. Inquiring minds want to know!
     
  5. Smacky the Frog

    Smacky the Frog Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm really surprised how much gain is on this amp. Can't even fathom what amount is available on the valveking
     
  6. Jonathan Byrnside

    Jonathan Byrnside Member

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    There are a couple things that are moderately difficult to the whole classic line.

    First, there are a tone of jacks and posts, each with its own nut and washer, that must come off to access the board

    Secondly, the circuit is actually printed on multiple boards (three, if my memory serves me correctly). Each board is connected by fragile jumper wire that can break pretty easily, especially when you're pulling them out repeatedly to do mods.

    Other than that, I have found them relatively easy to work on. They're class A, so no need to bias. They're US built with really solid chassis. The components are decent quality and spaced far enough apart and of decent size to work on and replace. Pretty much the only thing you have to worry about is that everything is soldered correctly. I've seen a couple with cold joints that made them pretty noisy.
     

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