r 'n' b sliding 4ths and 5ths

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Aj_rocker, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. Aj_rocker

    Aj_rocker Member

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    hey gang

    i was on a tube the other day and i wondered who was the first person to use them, as in the earlist recording of them. you know they are a classic thing now but started us off.


    AJ
     
  2. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    Its very old
    But Jimi Hendrix did that alot
    And he was a great soulmusician

    But the whole moving of especially 4ths comes quite natural on a Guitar
    I think we will find it in Jazz, Blues, Hawaian guitar and way back in traditional westafrican guitarplaying and Luth-playing
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2009
  3. Elektrik_SIxx

    Elektrik_SIxx Member

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    I'm guessing guys like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper pioneered it.
     
  4. bobmc

    bobmc Supporting Member

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    Sometimes I wish I could STOP using them! When I hear myself on playback, I find I overplay them.
     
  5. Franklin

    Franklin Member

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    I finally have overcome that same issue. It's just that they sound so good, it's hard to not too sometimes... :banana
     
  6. bobmc

    bobmc Supporting Member

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    Franklin,

    I find that folks mistake my use of them for actual talent! (which in turn, makes it all that much harder giving them up)
     
  7. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    I'm not quite sure I am following what the OP is talking about. Are you talking about slurring the note into the fourth, as in coming up from underneath? I may already be familiar (and doing this), but I don't understand the OP's question.
     
  8. cameron

    cameron Member

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    I think he's talking about sliding double-stops, such as heard on tunes like "Rainy Night In Georgia", as cited above. Cornell Dupree is a real master of that kind of style.
     
  9. Aj_rocker

    Aj_rocker Member

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    cheers cameron, i was merely wondering, i love to use them in a ballards (like all of us do!!). i think curtis might been the "first" if that means anything it doesnt but still!

    I have more 4ths than talent for sure!!

    AJ
     
  10. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    When I think of a fifth interval that's the basic power chord, and the fourth interval is the inversion of the same, as in Deep Purple, Smoke on the water. Are you actually talking about 6th intervals here? Eg, a third degree of the scale, played under the octave of the root? Then you harmonize that interval right up or down. If so, yes I dig that sound a lot.
     
  11. cameron

    cameron Member

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    The guys who slide double-stops around use both 6ths (inverted 3rds) and 4ths (inverted 5ths). The sixths (think of Cropper's intro to "Soul Man") usually involve skipping a string and are often finger picked. I've heard 6ths like that referred to as "Memphis 6ths" - because of the Steve Cropper connection and the Stax/Volt records he played on.

    So it'll be a 6th when a string is skipped, and a 4th when adjacent strings are played. Individual licks can use both intervals in various combinations . . .
     
  12. Poppa Stoppa

    Poppa Stoppa Member

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    OK I don't know who did it first, certainly Jimi stole from Curtis Mayfield, but why don't we tab our favourites so we can all learn some nice tricks here?

    I take it we're talking about this kind of thing (in A):

    --5~7~5--------------------------
    --5~7~5--5~7~5-------------------2
    ----------4~6~4-----------2~4~2--2
    -------------------2~4~2--2~4~2-------
    -------------------2~4~2---------
    ----------------------------
    Any more for any more?

    Geoff
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2009
  13. wallinbb

    wallinbb Member

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    Great thread! Keep 'em coming, please!
     
  14. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    Check out the beginning of "Castles made of sand"
     
  15. fr8_trane

    fr8_trane Supporting Member

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    Technically speaking this gospel/soul/R&B rhythm style makes use of sliding and hammered on 3rd's, 4th's, 5th's and sixths. Blues, funk and country players also use sliding tritones quite effectively. Country guys also tend to use bends more than hammer ons - like bending a minor 3rd up to a 4th or even a ma7 to a unison.
     
  16. ohmslaw

    ohmslaw Member

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    Go back and listen to early jazz, be-bop, and big band like Glenn Miller and you will hear players and singers using this type of thing day and night. Frankly I too don't have much of a clue as to precisely what the thread is actually about but from the conversation thus far can assume it means blues notes and a generally bluesy style but "sliding fourths and fifths?" Sliding which way? Bending? Slurring? No mention of double stops. Can you link to a clip? You will get an even better answer like that.
     
  17. Aj_rocker

    Aj_rocker Member

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    hey, i hear ya.

    I meant sliding 4ths and 5ths. like all the soul/gospel guys do. get me?
     
  18. mc5nrg

    mc5nrg Member

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    Floyd Cramer (nashville piano man) was one of the folks who helped popularise that-.
     
  19. ohmslaw

    ohmslaw Member

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    You mean sliding double-stops like the video shows. Can be thirds or fourths or fifths or sixths.
     

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