Randy Rhoads Iso tracks. Killer!!!

Hefalump

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9,225
Why did you use quotation marks around “crappy tone?” I didn’t even use that phrase. I was just responding to a bizarre excuse.

Whose idea was it to use the MXR distortion pedal?
No offense meant..wasnt directec at you....directed at those who are here moaning about the tone.
 

R3deemed

Member
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7,753
Randy was using ss amps in quiet riot???? News to me...and I would have to call BS on that.....an easy youtube search should prove what he used in some live footage of Randy with quiet rot....think it was Marshall?

I love both Ed and Randy, but the op asked who is technically better, and I stand by Randy as the far superior technical player.

Groove, swing, tone....yup Ed is that man.....but that is a diffrrent queston.


Ed grew up playing piano, and was very very goid at it btw.
Call BS all you want. He didn't start using Marshalls until Ozzy.

@R3deemed Here is Randy playing with quiet riot BEFORE Ozzy....Sure as Heck sounds like a big ol MARSHALL stack to me???? Solo starts at 37:10

http://www.nobitching.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=6862

https://www.groundguitar.com/randy-rhoads-guitars-and-gear/

Randy Rhoads’ Guitar Amps:
– 1970s Peavey Standard 260
Used with the Quiet Riot. He played it through a cabinet packed with six Altec speakers. The amp is now kept at the Musonia.
Supposedly Ozzy would never let Randy use this Peavey, so Greg Leon who took Randy’s place in Quiet Riot lent him a couple of Marshall rigs.
https://reverb.com/item/1482547-peavey-standard-series-260-1970s

https://www.guitarplayer.com/players/rudy-sarzo-on-randy-rhoads

Rudy Sarzo on Randy Rhoads:
You wrote that when you auditioned for Ozzy, Randy’s tone and his playing had changed a lot since your Quiet Riot days.

His tone had totally changed. With Quiet Riot he had a Peavey amp. It was some late-’70s solid-state model and he had a cabinet with six JBLs. He ran his MXR distortion box in the front. With Ozzy he was using Marshalls, but to me one of the most important parts of his sound was the wah. He would keep the wah-wah on during his rhythm lines. I think he started using the wah with his Marshalls because they were giving him a wider tone than the Peavey. He wanted to cut down those lower frequencies. His tone was more shelved than the average guitar player’s. He specifically chose the right frequencies to make his rhythms sound articulate.
 

Hefalump

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9,225

Interesting, I will look into that a bit, certainly thought he had Marshalls going in late Quite Riot days.

Still he is a much better technical player than ED. Doesn't change that.
 

Bankston

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16,274
I remember reading a quote from someone -- Kelli Garni maybe -- saying Randy wasn't all that impressed with EVH either and that the guitarist on the L.A. Strip scene that he admired the most was George Lynch. George, meanwhile, described his relationship with Randy as casual buds and that he didn't fully appreciate how great Randy was until he heard the Ozzy recordings and took over Randy's teaching spot at Musonia.

All those cats were rivals to be the breakout guitar hero from that scene so I'm not surprised by the alleged public comments from any of them.

I'm not sure I get the comments about Randy having "more technique" or being a "more technical player" than EVH. Randy was more structured in his approach and Eddie was more free-form but both of them had virtuoso technique and chops.
 

Hefalump

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9,225
I was able to find a picture off the back of a japanese bootleg of the quiet riot concert i posted....and you are correct...he is using a ss peavy and 6 x 12 cab...lol...amazing that it sounds as good as it does.....lol
 

R3deemed

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7,753
I remember reading a quote from someone -- Kelli Garni maybe -- saying Randy wasn't all that impressed with EVH either and that the guitarist on the L.A. Strip scene that he admired the most was George Lynch. George, meanwhile, described his relationship with Randy as casual buds and that he didn't fully appreciate how great Randy was until he heard the Ozzy recordings and took over Randy's teaching spot at Musonia.

All those cats were rivals to be the breakout guitar hero from that scene so I'm not surprised by the alleged public comments from any of them.

I'm not sure I get the comments about Randy having "more technique" or being a "more technical player" than EVH. Randy was more structured in his approach and Eddie was more free-form but both of them had virtuoso technique and chops.
I think it comes from the fact that one of them knew what they were doing and could teach others while one of them did not and could not.

I recall reading that Ritchie Blackmore called Eddie unorthodox. Eddie played outside the rules, so to speak. He didn't necessarily know the rules and probably didn't much care.

His ear and natural ability are something else. If I had a choice between Ed’s ear and Randy's knowledge, I'd probably choose the ear.

I was able to find a picture off the back of a japanese bootleg of the quiet riot concert i posted....and you are correct...he is using a ss peavy and 6 x 12 cab...lol...amazing that it sounds as good as it does.....lol
I go back to the After Hours footage time and time again. I just can't get into the Youtube QR stuff. Maybe it's just the TGP tone-snob in me.

I'm listening to the QR Randy Rhoads Years CD as I type this. It does sound better than the live YT clips IMO.

Playing with Ozzy unlocked something, and I get George's comment.
 

jeff5371

Gold Supporting Member
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940
Obviously tone is all subjective. It's also subjective that older gear is better, but that is a different subject! :) I simply meant that he did not have the options that players do today with regards to gear. Personally, I don't mind Randy's tone at all.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
Messages
13,879
Didn't he use an MXR distortion plus between that Les Paul and Marshall? Also, a lot of the tone comes from the player.

"Get a grip". LOL! We're coming unglued because we don't like RR's tone.

That is one of the reasons I have a variety of vintage D+s. :)

From what I understand it wasn't an "always on" thing.

I could be wrong. I was wrong about him using SS amps with QR.
 
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Thwap

Platinum Supporting Member
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10,228
He was great.
His leads were magic.
And those were very cool to listen to.

What a talent.
 

Dark Matter

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
609
Each time I hear isolated tracks all I can think of are these iconic tones are just ok.
Can't tell if you're being ironic, but if you mean this seriously, WOW could I not disagree more. The rhythm track in Flying High Again is even more incredible "naked" than it is in the mix. The bite of his pick attack and that chewy distortion are so powerful (to me) that it is almost emotional. It's like he's tearing those chords off the fret board, and the tones are as rich and complex as that style of guitar can produce.

I could only open Mr. crowley. But yeah, it did not sound quite right to me. I wore that album/cassette out in my teens.
I only listened to Flying High Again, but that's him for sure. That tone and those notes were imprinted somewhere deep in my young soul nearly 40 years ago, and are unmistakable.
 

sanrico

Senior Member
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12,240
Thank you for posting these. I've never been much of an Ozzy fan, but I absolutely loved Randy Rhoads.
 

Renardm

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514
I actually like his tone! It stands out from other guitarists and fits the music. I prefer his tone on Madman to Blizzard.
 

Hammered

Silver Supporting Member
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3,506
I remember reading a quote from someone -- Kelli Garni maybe -- saying Randy wasn't all that impressed with EVH either and that the guitarist on the L.A. Strip scene that he admired the most was George Lynch. George, meanwhile, described his relationship with Randy as casual buds and that he didn't fully appreciate how great Randy was until he heard the Ozzy recordings and took over Randy's teaching spot at Musonia.

All those cats were rivals to be the breakout guitar hero from that scene so I'm not surprised by the alleged public comments from any of them.

I'm not sure I get the comments about Randy having "more technique" or being a "more technical player" than EVH. Randy was more structured in his approach and Eddie was more free-form but both of them had virtuoso technique and chops.
The person that said that was Kevin Dubrow in Guitar World in 2007 I think it was . Kevin said that Randy thought Ed was good but that a lot of the stuff he did was like smoke and mirrors. As far as Randy and George being buds George was asked that at a guitar clinic I attended in late 2007 and I can’t remember George’s exact words but basically he said he and Randy were not friends and when it was brought up that Randy preferring his playing over Eds George downplayed it and said listen to the solo spot on Tribute it sounds like Eruption . Don’t shoot the messanger that just what I heard
 

Hefalump

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9,225
One of my favorite songs Randy recorded was Diary of a madman....you must listen on good headphones fairy loud to appreciate it...i get goosebumps at the genius of the guitar track.

Here is Randy at a clinic teaching the song...obviously he is a wizard at theory....jaw dropping player imho.
 
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Davepitt11

Member
Messages
1,281
Randy's tone in isolation may not be Andy Timmons/Eric Johnson/Larry Carlton-esque.... but in the mix I think it fits and was a tone that made lots of 14 year old boys want to play guitar. I liked his tone better than Jake's on Bark at the Moon, which I thought was too flanged.

But to me what made Randy great were all the little fills he added after lines in the verse and how there were those moments in a ripping solo where he would play something that you could totally sing... and then ripn again.
 
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7,023
Can't tell if you're being ironic, but if you mean this seriously, WOW could I not disagree more. The rhythm track in Flying High Again is even more incredible "naked" than it is in the mix. The bite of his pick attack and that chewy distortion are so powerful (to me) that it is almost emotional. It's like he's tearing those chords off the fret board, and the tones are as rich and complex as that style of guitar can produce.



I only listened to Flying High Again, but that's him for sure. That tone and those notes were imprinted somewhere deep in my young soul nearly 40 years ago, and are unmistakable.

In all honesty, I never was a big fan of RR. Also I didn't mean any disrespect to him in general. I hear a lot of these ISO tracks from other artist and their tone is nothing special in my opinion. If one identifies with the playing, I get that. I'm talking tone only.

I guess I hear these sounds and realize how blessed we are with all the things we can do now days in our bedroom rigs.
 
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537
Cool to hear he is using a lot of single notes vs. power chords in Mr. Crowley. When you hear Zakk or some of the other guys play it they are putting a 5 on the top and the bottom sometimes.
 

gtrdave

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,383
I'm a RR fan, no doubt, and hearing those iso tracks is like striking gold to my ears. Incredible playing from a guy who was destined to continue to grow, but never had the chance.
Still, an incredible player right where he was.

As far as his tone, there's one thing that's being missed: it was his. There's no mistaking RR when you hear the first two Ozzy records. Sure, the cocked wah tone didn't give him the same results as it gave, say, Schenker, but it was still a unique sound and especially in the early days of metal.

And as far as RR vs. EVH; Ed was wild. Not extremely schooled, but not ignorant either and he took chances that few others took. He was a blues player on acid.
Randy, on the other hand, was the more diverse and knowledgable musician and it showed in his chording, progressions and solos. He was wild, too, to a degree...I don't think a guitarist in L.A. could afford not to be during that era...but he was also more measured and precise than Ed was, drawing from a deeper understanding of classical theory. Whether it was learned or inherent, it doesn't matter; RR was better at some things than EVH and Ed was better at some things than Randy was.
Both were amazing rock guitarists who combined launched the guitar back into the spotlight after disco tried to kill it.
 






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