Re-Doing 1965 Super Reverb

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by jcombra, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. jcombra

    jcombra Member

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    Jun 14, 2008
    Hey folks, finally decided to give this one a shot. I've had a beautiful 1965 Super Reverb for years and i think it's time for a tune up. Every now and then there is a slight hum that comes from the amp, not all the time, but occasionally, then goes away for a while. This amp is as stock as stock can be and has never been touched. My question is, is there a resource that can walk me through replacing what caps and guts need/should be replaced and how to do it safely ? I'm looking for almost a 'tube repair by numbers,step by step ' kind of thing. I'm not above having somebody else do the work if i feel it's over my head........ but being a guitar builder for 20+ years i think i can focus well enough to repair an amp if the instructions are clear enough ! There are several sites that offer kits that include all the electronics, i just need guidance putting them in safely. All this talk of draining caps and such i take VERY serioussly.

    One last important, should i consider leaving it alone ? Again the hum is intermitent, and while i'm not much for keeping things original if they are not working, if it's better to just leave this amp alone, i'm fine with that as well........

    Thanks in advance,

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  2. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    Sterling, VA (not far from Washington DC)
    Not sure about a particular resource, but there's tons of stuff scattered about on the web.

    Short answer:
    Replace all electrolytic capacitors and none of the other ones. These include the power supply caps in the "dog house" under the chassis, bias cap, and cathode bypass caps. They should be mostly orangey/light brown in color. It's also worth replacing the screen and grid resistors soldered onto the power tube sockets as these have endured decades of abuse from heat. Power supply dropping resistors in the dog house might be worth replacing as well.

    Check the bias on the power tubes. The easiest way to do this is with one of the commercially available bias probes.
     
  3. jcombra

    jcombra Member

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    Jun 14, 2008
    Thanks Bluestrat, I just realized i should have posted this in the 'Tech' section that i didn't even notice !! My biggest concern is draining those caps, the web has me scared to death of getting electrocuted. What is the safest way to do that job ?

    Jim
     

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