Re-fret of 1996 Cunetto Nocaster/Resale Value?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by CNP, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. CNP

    CNP Member

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    I've got a great 1996 Cunetto Nocaster with stock vintage frets, and I'm thinking of having larger frets installed for playability reasons (I much prefer larger frets). Will this kill resale its value? I don't currently intend to sell the guitar, but knowing myself it's a real possibility. Any insights are greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Killcrop

    Killcrop Supporting Member

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    Wouldn't for me. As long as you have the COA you're fine. There are a lot of Partcastrs made from custom shop parts these days. So no having the COA is the deal wrecker these days.
     
  3. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    I would think for every person that might have some concern for a refret of that particular guitar, there would probably be 2 or more that would say, "Thank goodness you already did that, now I won't have to. I like bigger frets, too."

    I wouldn't worry about it.
    Get the best quality refret you can afford.
    Play.
    Enjoy.
    :dude
     
  4. johan

    johan Member

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    I don't think it would harm the resale value that much. If it's what you want, go for it. Otherwise I'd be happy to take care of that Nocaster. I have a 96 too and it's the best guitar I've ever tried.
    You wanna deal?
     
  5. ethomas1013

    ethomas1013 Supporting Member

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    I had my '96 NoCaster refretted with larger frets a few years ago and never looked back. The way I look at it, if you play the guitar sooner or later it's going to need refretted anyway. The fact that you referet it with larger frets shouldn't impact the value from my perspective. When it comes time to refert my Relic Strat, I'll have it done with larger frets too.
     
  6. OldSchool

    OldSchool Senior Member

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    I highly reccomend going to this guy: http://www.orkiespoil.com/


    He may be the best in the buisness. :dude
     
  7. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    +1
     
  8. CNP

    CNP Member

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    Thanks for the insights/advice! Got the COA, case candy and case, Dave. Sounds like a good refret's the way to go, which is what I was hoping to hear. Have a great holiday weekend everyone.
     
  9. bluestein

    bluestein Member

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    Right or wrong, the early Cunettos are viewed as collectable.

    Changing the frets will kill the resale. No question about it. And at some point ALL guitars get resold - whether by you, your family, heirs, IRS - whatever.

    A proper refret will cost $300 +. You could buy a replacement neck for little more - pop it on - and solve your problem without destroying the "collectability" factor. Save the original neck for later.
     
  10. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    This is, of course, just my humble opinion, but only a moron (or an anal vintage homo) would devalue a guitar that has had a pro-quality refret.



    It's like buying a 10-year old car that's never had an oil change.
     
  11. Relicula

    Relicula Supporting Member

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    The refretting may apply to vintage guitars for the collector types, but any guitar from 96 on, shouldnt be worried.
     
  12. bluestein

    bluestein Member

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    Yes - but of the current production Fender guitars, the early Cunettos may have a shot at being very desirable in the future.

    There's no way to know what will be the hot instrument 30 years up the road. CNP wanted to know if it would impact the resale. For a collector - absolutely.

    Collectors have a very different mentality than players.

    The early Marshall plexis are a perfect example.

    Master volume makes perfect sense from a player standpoint - but the mod will drop the value of an early plexi dramatically...sometimes as much as 90%
     
  13. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    A refret is hardly the same as a mod...

    Bad tubes, capacitors, etc., routinely need replacing, no? Same with frets -- especially if the guitar is actually being played...
     
  14. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Member

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    I don't know if that's the best example. Most guys who like Plexis think master volumes a) sound like crap (I'm one), and b) there's no reason to drill holes in an old Marshall to install one anyway.

    Drilling holes through a chassis is un-necessary hackery - refretting a guitar is just an eventuality. Like changing strings really.

    Jim
     
  15. fullerplast

    fullerplast Senior Member

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    I'm middle ground on this. For a collectible guitar (which the Cunettos certainly are), if you take two examples with one all original and one with a refret, the original will almost always be worth more on resale.

    I don't think a refret will "kill" resale value, but it certainly won't help it and will likely hurt it a bit. Exactly how much it hurts depends on how collectible they become. At the current levels I wouldn't expect it to hurt much more than a couple of hundred dollars, if that. Ten years down the road, an all original version could be worth considerably more-but we won't know until we get there.;)
     
  16. John Hurtt

    John Hurtt Supporting Member

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    From a collectibility standpoint a refret will devalue the guitar down the road. How much is hard to tell, but there will be an impact. All you need to do it look at the collectors market now, any work done to a guitar hurts the collectibility. You can change the strings (which is closer to changing the oil on a car, btw ;) ) but that's about it.

    If you are that concerned about the value down the road buy another neck to play it with, as was already suggested.
     
  17. WrapAround

    WrapAround Member

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    It's quite simple, really....

    If you are al all worried about resale, get another neck with the fretwire of choice and swap it out with the original.

    If you aren't at all concerned with the resale of the instrument, then have it refretted.

    I refretted my Cunetto Nocaster and even use it on gigs. I'm sure "non-factory" dings and stains have devalued the guitar quite a bit at this point. ;)
     
  18. fullerplast

    fullerplast Senior Member

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    Actually, for a maple neck the refret issue is a bit more complex. Since the nitro is sprayed after the frets are installed, the laquer has to be carefully scored prior to removing the frets. It is very difficult to get it right without a refin of the fingerboard. On a relic, this is an important part of the "look". A refret that also includes a refin of the board would considerably impact value for these guitars. On the other hand, a refret without a refin will often result in some laquer chipping around the frets and marks in the finish from the fret pulling.

    Needless to say, choose the best fret person you can find if you choose to go this route and make sure you understand the whole process and the method he uses (ie don't be surprised by a guy that thinks he's doing you a favor by refinning that ratty old fingerboard:D )
     
  19. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    So let's get this straight.

    - First we buy a relic'd guitar because we like the feel/look of a "broken in guitar"
    - Then we start worrying about refretting the neck because keeping the relic'd finish on the neck "original" and "pristine" is more important?

    Re-read the above until you get the joke.
    :)


    I've got the solution.
    Let's petition Fender to start refretting all relics and be done with the problem....
    After all, a refretted relic would be much more "authentic", true?


    You're either buying guitars to play, or buying them to collect.
    There's nothing wrong with either goal/passion.

    But if you're going to play them, just PLAY the damn thing.

    Swapping out a great feeling relic'd neck for a different neck is just so plain wrong.


    My goal in this life is to enjoy everything I've been blessed with.
    - Yes, as crazy as it sounds, I'm actually USING the vintage speakers in my vintage amps and cabs until they blow.
    - Yes, I'm actually throwing caution to the wind, and PLAYING my vintage and collectible guitars, even if the wear and dings devalues them.
    - Yes, I'm actually lending them to my friends to use and enjoy, knowing full well they might ding them and return them in worse shape than they got them in.
    Life could be worse, you know?


    Let's put it this way.
    When you're on your deathbed, do you want to be thinking, "You know, that great feeling relic'd neck I played so much it needed a refret? I'm sure glad I never refretted it, and was able to sell it for more money because of it."
    :confused:

    Park the damn thing in it's case or use it.
    So shoot me.
    :eek: :D
     
  20. fullerplast

    fullerplast Senior Member

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    As silly as it may seem, the Cunetto's are kind of a special "subset" of relics. They have reached collectible status and as such are entitled to the lack of logic and common sense that collectibles enjoy.:D

    The fact remains that you can seriously reduce the value of this guitar if you refinish the neck with a refret. You can reduce the value less if you can manage it without a refin but it will still lose value.

    You can either care about it or not. It may depend on how long you want to keep the guitar and how attached you are, whatever. I think the original poster just wanted to know a refret of an original Cunetto would reduce the value. I think the answer is yes, it would. That doesn't mean he should or shouldn't do it. It is just more information to help him make a decision.:cool:
     

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