Reccomend a great jazz guitar DVD

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by charley, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. charley

    charley Supporting Member

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    I am looking for a great instructional DVD for Jazz guitar. I have the Tomo Fugita DVD and a John Scofield DVD on order. Any more suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. jmadill

    jmadill Gold Supporting Member

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    Larry Carlton

    -jm
     
  3. littlemoon

    littlemoon Member

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    Jimmy Bruno "No Nonsense Jazz"

    littlemoon
     
  4. neve1073

    neve1073 Member

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    bruce forman did one that is very good for bebop.
     
  5. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    No access to VHS? Unfortunately the Scott Henderson 2 VHS set hasn't been released on DVD, but if you're coming from Tomo's DVD, this would be a really good next step. Like the Sco DVD, these are more fusion than they are straight ahead jazz, but all the material applies to both. The first tape is about a ton of ideas of what to use over which of the 3-5 most common chord types (and it's a pretty vast amount of knowledge that he presents). The second is all about phrasing and melodic development. It's definitely all intermediate to advanced level stuff. Anyway, for the $20. I paid for them new, they're probably the best value I've gotten, almost worth getting a VCR for if you don't have one.

    That failing, I'd second the Jimmy Bruno recommendation. Though I'm not nuts about his scale system (I just think CAGED is simpler and more widely used/recognized) he does cover a lot of bases with the video that will help you play jazz.

    Good luck!
     
  6. Dana

    Dana Guest

    In my opinion, Jerry Bergonzi's Inside Improvisation DVD is one of the best systems for learning to improvise over chord changes, and it's good for all instruments. He takes 4 note phrases, shows you how to slightly alter them for different chord qualities, and then shows you how to create melodies by mixing up different permutations. His books and DVD really helped me get a handle on improvisation.

    [​IMG]



     
  7. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I love the books and have almost all of them now. I actually didn't know there was a DVD. I'll look into that. Thanks!

    BTW, the 7th book was just released last month.
     
  8. bobgoblin

    bobgoblin Supporting Member

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    gee, i thought someone woulda jumped on this: Joe Pass, anything by him, he was an amazing musician & his personality really shines thru in his teaching/conversation style. if yer into the bluer side of jazz, anything by duke robillard. i also liked jazz for the electric blues guitarist by adrian ingram, not too hard to grasp, kinda safe, but a nice place to start if yer coming from a blues background. good luck!
     
  9. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I thought about mentioning the Joe Pass ones (Jazz Lines and The Blue Side of Jazz), but Joe's approach is pretty scattered (IMO, of course) and I think they're really only good for people advanced enough to hear what he's presenting and who are willing to transcribe what isn't notated in the little booklets. So if you're conversational with lots of jazz theory, the vids are great. If you're still struggling with jazz theory, then I wouldn't recommend them.

    I've checked out Duke Robillard's video Blues, Jazz and Swing Guitar, but didn't care for it much myself. It too seemed really scattered and like he was just winging it, but that he got lost a lot while winging it. I wouldn't recommend it over, say, Robben Ford's videos which are pretty terrific if you're coming from a blues background and are wanting to play more jazz.

    Not trying to flame, just stating why I wouldn't recommend them in this context. Just opinions....blah, blah.
     
  10. bobgoblin

    bobgoblin Supporting Member

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    i agree wholeheartedly, however, if we don't push ourselves...right?

    forgot about robben's vid, that's a good one! jody fisher has some beginner/intermediate stuff out there, its ok.

    i wonder, if he's looking at tomo's & sco's stuff, he might be able to get the Pass stuff, also, henderson's a monster, so wouldn't the same apply? not trying to flame either, just an honest question.

    what i've done in the past is to get on netflix, they have some cool instructional vids on there that you can rent & keep for a while, if you like 'em.
     
  11. BFC

    BFC Supporting Member

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    I'll second Jimmy Bruno's No Nonsense Jazz Guitar which was recently re-released on DVD by a company that bought the rights to the Hotlicks catalog. Jimmy is an excellent teacher.
     
  12. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Agreed! And I am glad I have the Pass vids. I'm a big fan of his. It's worth figuring out everything on them, regardless of how long it takes.

    Lots of great ones on Netflix, I do that too! That's where I got to check out the Bruno DVD and some other pretty good ones. I think the Robben Ford ones are up there too.

    Henderson's approach actually is pretty high level, but I think it's cool (in the first VHS) how he basically will suggest scales/arps/formulas for playing over minor/dom/major scales and in a pretty easy to follow way, like "play a pentatonic scale a minor 3rd up from the root of the dom chord for an alt sound". Maybe I take it for granted that I know some of that stuff, but it wasn't hard for me to figure out how to play that, at least to try it once in a while.

    I think Sco's is similar (watched it like 20 years ago). I just remember him kinda' going over the modes of melodic minor and don't remember much instruction beyond how he might use them, etc. I'd like to watch it again now, but I remember not feeling like I had a whole lot of practical stuff to try after watching it.

    My take is you should get your hands on all of them to see what you like and don't like for yourself. Hell, I collect the stuff so I'm kinda' jaded. Things I didn't like might be just the ticket for someone else.

    Cheers,

    Dave
     
  13. Dana

    Dana Guest

    This is just my opinion, so it's worth around $.02

    In my opinion, videos and DVD's are not the best way to learn. Many of these videos seem to be more for entertainment value than anything. They give the impression that you're sitting down with your favorite guitar hero. Many of them seem scattered in their approach.

    My advice would be for anyone wanting to learn guitar.

    1 Study with the best music teacher you can find. (Doesn't have to be a guitar player either. I'm currently studying with a piano player.)

    2 Transcribe a ton of solos from the best players in whatever genre you're wanting to study. And not just guitar players. Transcribe horn players, piano, etc. Learn to play entire solos up to speed with the CD. Also, take favorite phrases from solos and play them in all 12 keys at different tempos. Learn at least 2 different fingerings for each phrase.

    3 Get some great books and work through them. I personally love Jerry Bergonzi's Inside Improvisation Books. I prefer books of this type over note for note transcription books, as I prefer to transcribe my own solos and come up with my own fingerings.

    4 Get a weekly jam going with other musicians who are at the same musical level as you. Or, get a practice partner. Get together weekly and play scales, chords, and tunes together.

    5 DVD's, Videos, etc.
     
  14. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Good advice! Well worth the $0.02. ;)
     
  15. bobgoblin

    bobgoblin Supporting Member

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    sheeeee...i'd give 'em at least a nickel for that advice!

    Dana: fantastic ideas, i've studied w/2 saxophonists, a pianist, a banjoist, 3 guitarists, and play often w/a trombonist who's got some killer melodic ideas. transcribing is great, if frustrating, i cut my jazz teeth on miles davis' stuff, kind of blue, blueing, etc, mostly because i love his use of space, but also because since there aren't that many notes (just great ideas), I got a feel for using melodic ideas in new ways.

    re: books, David Baker has some great stuff out there, i checked some of it out of my university library years ago, hand copied stuff i liked, tried to memorize other things...great advice!
     
  16. Dana

    Dana Guest

    David Baker's books on Bebop are really good. I believe you can buy all 3 volumes for under $40, about the price for a one hour guitar lesson, and they're packed with enough ideas to keep anyone busy for a very long time.
     
  17. Dajbro

    Dajbro Member

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    There has been some good advice already given in this thread, so I'll just add my 2 cents if I may.

    What I like about being able to SEE, as well as hear, a particular player, is to gain insight into the nuances of their technique such as fingerings, hand positions, picking styles, etc. I have never approached videos with the idea that they will "teach me to play (fill in the blank)." However, there is a good chance that I would never be able to hear most of these people in a live situation, or take a lesson from them, so this is often the next best thing. They provide inspiration, insight into the players personality, and as I said before, can reveal certain technical issues that you might not realize only through listening.

    David
     
  18. jamminoutloud1

    jamminoutloud1 Supporting Member

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    +1 on the last comment! The 2 Scott Henderson videos are my favorite. The Robben Ford one is pretty good as well. The first Larry Carlton video I like a lot too. And I have an old John Scofield video from the 70's or 80's where he's talking about Improvisation. If you have the patience and are a decsent player, there are tons of great lines and knowledge to grab from this video. I recorded the whole thing onto a tape cassette. It makes it a lot easier to rewind and get the licks down good.
     
  19. NeuroLogic

    NeuroLogic Supporting Member

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    Re books, don't forget the Jamey Ambersold series. Vol 1 re Jazz and Improvise and the II - V - I book/cd jam tracks are excellent. I found it better to study theory in a non-guitar context, then apply it (learn-think, then play). These books have been used at a lot of colleges for decades.
     
  20. NeuroLogic

    NeuroLogic Supporting Member

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    Where can I but the Bergonzini dvd? Not shown on Amazon
     

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