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Recommend a decent chord book

JonSick

Member
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1,383
I'm after a decent chord book that goes past the standard chords and simple variations. So something that shows dominants, half diminished, etc... The two I've bought so far don't show these.

Cheers
 

cubistguitar

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6,069
I like the little Berklee Guitar Chord Dictionary book.
Concise and hits all your needs and then some.
I like how it gives you (2) drop2 and (2) drop3 forms for each chord.

of course the idea above to learn harmony thoroughly is the best way of course
making good music means good voice leading too, chord dictionaries cant really impart that info
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
23,092
I like the little Berklee Guitar Chord Dictionary book.
Concise and hits all your needs and then some.
I like how it gives you (2) drop2 and (2) drop3 forms for each chord.

of course the idea above to learn harmony thoroughly is the best way of course
making good music means good voice leading too, chord dictionaries cant really impart that info
Really learning chords always comes back to understating triads, major, minor, dim and aug.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
I second the Berklee Jazz Chords dictionary, it's small but all the chords are moveable.

Here it is:


The book is a little thicker than a pamphlet but the chords are all moveable.
 
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1,811
+ Western Harmony. If you really learn the notes all over then neck, you can skip the book. Which ideally you should. The book is like training wheels. A bird's eye view of what's going on to assist visualization in the beginning.
+1. I come up with voicings all the time that I KNOW aren't in the book but they fit my progressions perfectly.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Here is an example of how I use the book, the fretboard paper didn't scan well but this is just an example. Above the fretboard neck is whether it is Major, Minor or Dominant, the root is circled. Remember, they are moveable.

 

JonSick

Member
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1,383
I ordered the Berkelee book as it looks ideal :)

I couldn't find the neck paper for a decent price, so decided to mock some up in Photoshop and printed my own.

Absolutely I recognize the need to properly understand triads, etc. I just needed a little helping hand.

Thanks everybody for your help :)
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Now, keep in mind it is a very thin book but it is valuable. The way I came up with that chart is by going across sections of the seventh chords and including them in one neck progression, which does sound rather nice.

Here is a Facebook group where I uploaded all the moveable triad shapes that are used Major, Minor, Diminished, Augmented and their inversions. I got this from an instructor, not my mentor just an instructor, who was out of Berklee. He was a brilliant man and even had his own radio jazz show. I also have the Sevenths and Ninth moveable shapes that I got from this book. There are other files there that might interest you. It's a better file than I can post here, so just join the group and download it if you want it. They accept everyone. I also uploaded fretboard paper but you can probably make better than mine.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/17478193437/files/
 

MartinPiana

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,538
Really learning chords always comes back to understating triads, major, minor, dim and aug.
This is true. But in my experience, the more shapes I memorize (and develop muscle memory for), the quicker it is for me to figure out related chords.... Kinda like reading and speaking when you're learning a new language....
 
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cubistguitar

Member
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6,069
Early on I definitely felt I had to memorize a host of voicings that worked on different string sets, but I wasn't organized in my pursuits. Lately learning more tunes in a chord melody approach has been the most rewarding, your have to play the melody notes and they often make very interesting extensions on the chords or even suggest substitutions you just wouldnt think of without considering both the melody and the harmony at the same time. Now I organize more by the top note than the bottom one, much better for the music.
 

nrandall85

Member
Messages
2,356
Learn triads, guide tones, and chord scales!

Not knocking any of the great books, but developing chord vocabulary is about developing the basics, NOT trying to memorize 300 voicings for Fm7b5!

Try this:

Take a tune you like

Voice lead all the triads of the tune on all string sets, and then use spread voicings

Voice lead guide tones (3 and 7) through the changes.

Replace any triad note with an adjacent scale tone. There are literally hundreds of chords you can find this way. If you find one you really like, try moving it up and down the scale.

Keep going! There's at least ten years or more of study just following this outline. I still work on these things daily.
 

JonSick

Member
Messages
1,383
Here is an example of how I use the book, the fretboard paper didn't scan well but this is just an example. Above the fretboard neck is whether it is Major, Minor or Dominant, the root is circled. Remember, they are moveable.
This is a really good tip! It's how I plan to go with it. I've started off with the main triads per triplet of strings and planning on expanding later on. Thank heavens for "free" printing at work :)
 

JonSick

Member
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1,383
This is true. But in my experience, the more shapes I memorize (and develop muscle memory for), the quicker it is for me to related chords.... Kinda like reading and speaking when you're learning a new language....
That;s what a chord book is now about for me... Firstly checking my work and second to see if there's "another better" way and then developing muscle memory.

Before this thread, I was convinced I just had to learn them parrot fashion but between this thread and what my teacher has been trying to knock into me is that it's more about figuring out how to harmonise the neck in effect.
 






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