recording guitar

bluesfloyd

Member
Messages
32
hi,guys
i want to record my self playing guitar, i would like to mic the cab and try and record a true sound of me playing, what audio interface do you guys recommend i use??? I intend to use audacity to record my playing, I am open to suggestion,

thanks for your time guys,
bluesfloyd,
 

Fran Guidry

Member
Messages
442
The audio interface is probably the second least important factor in recording "the true sound." And the software is probably first. Recommendations for an interface depend a lot on your computer, mic(s), and budget, and the greatest of these is budget.

Fran
 

nsureit

Old Guy...but not too old
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,849
You need a good microphone and an interface with good preamps. Do this first.
 

bluesfloyd

Member
Messages
32
hi,guys
much thanks for your replies,
I do have a SM57 mic, my laptop runs windows 10, so what do you guys recommend for software and a interface,
my budget is average, not cheap, but not expensive

all the best,
bluesfloyd,
 

vintagelove

Member
Messages
4,013
hi,guys
i want to record my self playing guitar, i would like to mic the cab and try and record a true sound of me playing, what audio interface do you guys recommend i use??? I intend to use audacity to record my playing, I am open to suggestion,

thanks for your time guys,
bluesfloyd,


The eleven rack is a great place to start. It's a Swiss Army knife, even for a well equipped studio.
 

kludge

The droid you're looking for
Messages
7,108
Yeah, just get a Focusrite 2i2 and start recording. Don't overthink it! The interface actually makes very little difference, especially these days.
 

Dumdeediddle

Member
Messages
2,298
I used a Audient id14 for a while. Was the only truly glitch free I/O I have used in 17 years. (if you are talking Pro-Tools).
I now use a UA Apollo Usb Twin. Check it out. Works flawlessly. Sounds great. And has many useful ways to record.
 

richpjr

Member
Messages
2,415
I used a Audient id14 for a while. Was the only truly glitch free I/O I have used in 17 years. (if you are talking Pro-Tools).
I now use a UA Apollo Usb Twin. Check it out. Works flawlessly. Sounds great. And has many useful ways to record.

I wish I had that experience with my ID14. I have had lots of annoying problems with mine and the latency has been just so-so. It does sound great and has a great HI-Z input on it. But I'm thinking of replacing it with a Babyface Pro.
 

Dumdeediddle

Member
Messages
2,298
Sorry to hear that was your experience. Not sure why mine was so trouble free. But I m using a very nice PC at this time. Lots of Ram and such. Also, this version of Pro Tools 11 I am using is remarkably trouble & Glitch free (for a change).
 

Ejay

Senior Member
Messages
8,014
If you are not experienced in recording yet, focus on getting a daw, pc, and soundcard that function care free. The impact that these have on your sound is not where you will get your first good results.

Your first Challenges are:

- a good sound source (amp & Your playing)
- capturing it: mic positioning
- 57 combined with a Large diafragma cond mic are a proved concept.

Consider that micing an amp is damn hard...and a quick fix may be running Your speaker out through a good cab sim/power soaker...or get a Kemper profiler :)
 

seby

Member
Messages
164
Take the time experimenting with mic positions. If you can, put aside a day or two for just this. Try your cab in different rooms, with as many different positions as you can think of.

For example, try the cab in the bathroom pointing out the door, but as far into the bathroom as possible. Get a 57 up close and move it around until you are happy with it. Now put a large diaphragm condenser outside the room but pointing into it. Try different distances and heights, being careful of phase cancellation. You should end up with something pretty cool, and also unique. This is way more fun, and more interesting, than anything that you will do with a plugin!
 

richpjr

Member
Messages
2,415
Sorry to hear that was your experience. Not sure why mine was so trouble free. But I m using a very nice PC at this time. Lots of Ram and such. Also, this version of Pro Tools 11 I am using is remarkably trouble & Glitch free (for a change).

I've had issues with it on both an iMac and on a new PC running a fresh load of Windows 10 with little else on the computer. It just stops outputting sound. The meters show activity, but nothing comes out. Unplugging it and plugging it back in sometimes fixes it, but sometimes I have to reboot my computer to get sound back. Happens several times a week - very annoying. Tried uninstalling and reinstalling drivers, updated the firmware and it still happens. Add in the so-so latency, and I'm not overly impressed. I will say the sound quality is quite nice after I get it going.
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
12,730
The audio interface is probably the second least important factor in recording "the true sound." And the software is probably first.

+1
Right there.
Interface is about the features not the sound in any significant way for what you are doing.

The BIG thing is the mic and the mic pre. If the interface Does have a preamp in it, that is significant. If you are using outboard pre, the quality of the cheapest interface is going to be close enough to the best stuff to get work done.

I use Reaper and an old RME interface, for the record. Mics and pres are a whole nother thing.
 

guitarplayer1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
462
Ok , I'll throw my $.02 here.

Sounds like you are a novice at recording ...good news is recording electric guitar is simple as can be. As far as interfaces go .... the focus rite line is very well priced and sounds great ... the other one I like a lot is the Apogee stuff. Their lower end stuff is also really well priced and sounds great, some of it however is really only for Mac. I disagree with what some have said with regards to interface not making a difference in sound ... it does as it contains the AD (Analog to Digital) and DA (Digital to Analog) converters ... once again any of the newer stuff sounds really good so I don't think ultimately it will make any difference.

Once you have the interface you are set as the interface also contains a mic pre (which again affects the sound). Here again , even the lower priced options are good ... in my experience the difference between good and great is not huge but the price differences are ... I've spent a huge amount of money just on my convertors (Apogee Symphony) and a pretty nice chunk of change on my preamps ... API, Great River ... that stuff does matter but it's all about a chain. Spending huge amounts on money on one thing without regard to the others will yield less than great results .... putting racing tires on a honda.

Once you have that you need a mic ... just get a Shure SM57 ($85) and call it a day for now. Mixing mics is a possibility but you don't need to even think about that now. Point that 57 at the edge of where the cone meets the dustcap ... plenty of illustrations online ... right on the grill or back a few inches .... done!

I've got a 57 on a cab in my studio along with a Royer 121 ( Expensive ribbon) .... many times I just use the 57 ....it's the sound of recorded guitar !!!

Now you need a place where you can turn on an amp and not worry about volume . IMHO, it does NOT need to be loud but a amp is still not exactly quiet. Closets work well and since you are close micing it shouldn't affect the sound too much but remember it's still in a closet. Using close micing and using a 57 usually goes a long way to diminish room sounds and bad reflections ... in other words makes a less than ideal spot acceptable for recording ... I recorded all the time with lower volume (even though I can crank without any issues) and it sounds great. Plenty of fantastic pedals as well .... you don't have to crank an old marshall to get a great rock guitar tone.

Plenty of micing tutorials online .... just start doing it and don't let it intimidate you .... it's really easy.

Best of luck !
 
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