refret 1978 guild or get new guitar?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by G-delay, Feb 3, 2008.


  1. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    I have a beautiful (wine red with the arched back) guild D-25 (1977-78) which I bought used in 1978. I have played the hell out of the guitar for the last 30 years. It has a wonderful sound except for a flat open B, some questionable intonation and the 12 twelth fret high E is gone (unplayable unless you bend it in a little). The frets overall are worn pretty low everywhere (particularly in the 5th position A minor pentonic/blues and E minor pentonic areas - took me quiet a few years (25) to figure out other scales.

    My question is this: Can it be refretted and have the intonation fixed or have I worn it out? How much would it cost? She's been loyal and I would keep her but is it time to get that Taylor 414 I've been drooling over?

    Appreciate any help or suggestions.

    Grant
     
  2. jscorno

    jscorno Member

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    Re-fret! It'll cost you a couple hundred but she's worth it!
     
  3. Lawn Jockey

    Lawn Jockey Member

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    The real answer is re-fret...and buy the 414.
     
  4. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    Refret.

    The Taylor, while a good production guitar, will sound nowhere near as good as the Guild.
     
  5. skylabfilmpop

    skylabfilmpop Silver Supporting Member

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    one more for the refret. I havent bough t a new guitar in 25 years. Even if they are in decent condition I usually refret my electrics because both Gibson and fender, oops and I have a few guilds as well come with small frets that limit playability, tone, and intonation. YOur tech should be able to deal with your intonation and tuning issues by replacing your saddle with a compensated one and cutting a well made bone nut.
     
  6. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    Thanks guys,
    I'll
     
  7. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    I'll give refretting a shot. Anyone know a good acoustic guitar tech in the Bay Area?
     
  8. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm sure someone here can refer you to a good fret guy in your area...
     
  9. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    It seems like it takes lots of skill to cut a bone nut and replacing the saddle. I have an electric guitar tech but I've been hesitant to take it to him. Just seems like acoustics would be more delicate.
     
  10. riffmeister

    riffmeister Gold Supporting Member

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    Yes, find someone who specializes in acoustic guitars. There are many fine luthiers in northern CA, look through the list of luthiers that attend the Healsdburg Guitar Fesitval:

    http://www.lmii.com/GuitarFestival/

    .
     
  11. vrdyer

    vrdyer Silver Supporting Member

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    If it's a guitar you like and play often, refret it. I regret selling my 1968 SG Standard. But at the time I was in graduate school. I couldn't afford a refret and one of the pickups had shorted out.
     
  12. coldfingaz

    coldfingaz Member

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    Agree with everyone else that suggested a re-fret. Somebody on the Guild board suggested Frank Ford at Gryphon Strings in Palo Alto: http://www.gryphonstrings.com/
     
  13. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    Thanks, for all the good advice. I'll begin my search for a local luthier. I'm not to far from Palo Alto and that was quite an extensive list of luthers at the Healdsburg guitar festival. I'll have to go check it out.
     
  14. davess23

    davess23 Member

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    If you're anywhere near Tiburon, check with Eric Schoenberg's shop.

    And definitely go with fixing up your Guild. I've never understood why old Guilds aren't given the respect they deserve. I know this stuff is all a matter of opinion, but to my mind the Taylor just isn't in the same league.

    BTW, is it one of the original, all mahogany jobs, or is the top dyed spruce? (Both are good guitars, just wondering.)
     
  15. kevmin

    kevmin Supporting Member

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    Definitely give your old lady a nip and tuck rather than finance a new flame. It sounds like you already have her well-trained, and they don't make 'em like they used to.
     
  16. soulohio

    soulohio Member

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    i was looking at a Guild 87 D30 for $1000 clams...nice guitar but I thought it was too much....is it?
     
  17. G-delay

    G-delay Member

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    BTW, is it one of the original, all mahogany jobs, or is the top dyed spruce? (Both are good guitars, just wondering.)[/quote]

    I don't know for sure but I just checked the serial # and found out it was a 1974 D-25 Cherry Serial #96892. I'd always assumed it was a 1977. I believe the back and sides are mahogany (beautiful nonbraced arched back) and the top may be spruce. I'm not sure. Does anyone have info on the old Guilds?
     
  18. coldfingaz

    coldfingaz Member

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    Yeah, that's a bit on the high side unless it is in immaculate shape.
     
  19. coldfingaz

    coldfingaz Member

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    '74 was right around the time when they changed from all mahogany over to spruce tops so I'm pretty sure you are right about the specs. If yours has an arched instead of flat back, it is very likely a spruce top. There were just a handful of all hog D25's made with arched backs during the transition over to spruce tops/arched backs.
     
  20. bmgblues

    bmgblues Member

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    Hey G! Refret and buy the 414. Its a different thing man. The GA size of the 414 is nice for taking out and gigging or playing outside. The Guild is a killer vintage type for staying at home and strumming. I have a 71 D-44 and a CE414 ltd. Treat yourself man, its been 30 years since you bought an acoustic. Thats long enough!
     

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