Refretting to compound radius

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by gitarrjanne, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. gitarrjanne

    gitarrjanne Member

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    Jul 1, 2011
    i have a fender american std. strat and it's got laquer on the fretboard. if i lower the action really low after i have leveled the new frets, bends will still die out on the upper part of the guitar, so i always have to raise it a little bit

    is it possible to make the frets lower under the D and G strings on the 15-16-17- and so on frets to make a compound-ish thingy? this area will be lower than on the rest of the guitar.
     
  2. paulg

    paulg Supporting Member

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    You could do that and it might work,but if you want really low action you should consider a flatter radius. 12 to 16" would work better for low action bending. rather than flatten you fret board, you should consider a replacement neck (warmth, USA etc).
     
  3. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    I had a setup guy years ago who would take a little more off the middle of the frets up high, so that wouldn't happen.

    Worked great, IIRC.
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    the trouble with flattening the middles of the upper frets to "cheat" a compound profile is that the frets will now be lowest right where you'd need them highest for gripping the string; in the middle of the board at the upper register, right where you're holding out those bends you're trying to get choke-free!

    the stock 9.5" radius is not bad, you should be able to get decently low action anyway. it's the vintage 7.25" that's the real obstacle.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2012

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