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Repainting a 12 string Yamaha ?

donnyb

Member
Messages
560
Hello and thanks for reading this post.

I own an older 12 string Yamaha, model FGX412C, which has been in its case since I made a depressing stuff up of replacing its bridge a few years back.

Problem started when taking the old bridge off using a heat gun and a thin paint scraper (as viewed on Utube), my first time ever try of this. The bridge initially lifted off nicely on one side, but as my confidence and the bridge continued to lift as I pushed , the other side lifted too but took some splinters of the spruce top extending an inch beyond the bridge position with it.

Bummer. But I thought, I can fix it with some filler, feathered out, and as the guitar is finished in black lacquer, I should be able to respray and blend it all in. Easy ......not.

After a couple more attempts with the black toned differently, I can still see the repair area, and maybe Im the only one that can ! Anyway, I dont like it, and its time to get this guitar being played again !

(I think) I want to respray the whole guitar a new colour , but I need some advice regarding what to do with the white binding around the top and bottom of the body. I dont want to create another disaster trying to remove and replace it (never done that task), so I am thinking I will sand the whole guitar, body and neck back to its primer, and in so doing I would be sanding the clear from the binding and then a little of the surfaces of the binding itself, ie., down to the level of the guitar's body primer.

Then apply a light coat of primer, new colour and clear, hiding the old binding forever. Then fit the new bridge.

Im pretty experienced with the spraying bit, albeit solid bodies, just no experience with the sanding of and painting over the binding.

Your opinions gratefully sought !

Regards,

Don in Oz
 

B. Howard

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,211
Binding is scraped clean with a razor after the colors are sprayed but prior to clear coats.
 

donnyb

Member
Messages
560
Thank you Brian. A few questions arising if I could :

  1. You're basically saying I dont need to spray colour over the binding permanently to achieve a high quality uniform finish, provided I apply a very steady hand and lots of patience with the scraping?
  2. Is there one type and brand of razor blade that you have found works best for you eg straight edged blade over a fluted edge type ?
  3. After scraping, would you feather sand the line of the binding edge with say, 800 grit wet and dry paper before applying the clear ?
  4. Hypothetically, if I actually wanted to totally hide the binding for personal aesthetic reasons, would the method I outline in my original post do so ?
Regards.

Don
 

B. Howard

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,211
1. Yes. I use my thumb as a guide.
2. I use a regular utility knife blade. It needs to be stiff to avoid chatter. You may want to wrap some tape around the part you hold onto to protect your hand.
3. No, you will mess up the line. You just bury it with a bit of extra clear so it will sand flat without hitting the color when you buff.
4. Hypothetically yes, but in the real world all the ones I see done that way wind up with the bindings ghosting through.
 

donnyb

Member
Messages
560
Thank you again Brian. Great succinct replies. You paint a very clear picture, especially with #3, no pun intended !

And with your #4 answer... that ghosting was what I was afraid might be the case.

The only clarification I ask is the term "regular" regards the knife blade. In Australia, regular utility knife blades have become the fluted edge type, whereas years back, these were always plain straight edged. I assume you mean plain straight as that's what I can see in the mind's eye doing the scraping to give precision. I will need to source these out or buy over the internet, but I think a craft type hobby shop here would carry them.

Thanks again,

Don in Oz
 




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