Repair of small hole in speaker??

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by johnnyguitar, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. johnnyguitar

    johnnyguitar Long in the tooth Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a EVM-12L speaker that has a very tiny torn place on the outer rim..someone missed the hole installing it I guess..anyway the paper completly covers the hole..can I or should I put super glue or silicon gel or some thing on it?? Any thoughts..it's a great speaker and the tiny tear does not distort or affect the sound at all..thanks John
     
  2. Reeek

    Reeek Member

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    Yes, fix it. You'll hear many renditions of how to do it but I have used a small piece of paper sack and some elmers glue with outstanding results. If it's just puncture hole the glue should not matter. If it were an elongated tear along the flex line of the cone rim I would probably use a more flexible glue like silicone of epoxy but a puncture hole is not that big a deal and it should not affect the speaker tone too much if repaired with minimal material.
     
  3. Robal

    Robal Silver Supporting Member

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    FWIW, if you ever want to use a flexible glue for speaker repair, Orange County Speaker sells a glue for that purpose. I used it with great results on stress tears in the surround of a vintage JBL.
     
  4. jh45gun

    jh45gun Member

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    For fixing a small hole I use elmers wood glue and toilet paper or tissue as that is fiberous and takes the glue well.
     
  5. mbratch

    mbratch Member

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    I've done exactly the same with same results. :)
     
  6. mageerc

    mageerc Member

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    Take a multi-ply paper towel and separate the plies. Tear off a piece a bit larger than the hole and use Elmer's glue to patch the hole on the front side... repeat for the back side. Then use a bit of flat black spray paint to touch up the cone at the repairs and you have a nearly invisible repair.
     
  7. slider313

    slider313 Silver Supporting Member

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    Use rubber cement as it's still plyable after drying. If you need to reinforce the tear,a small piece of tissue paper will do.
     
  8. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Member

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    For a hole or tear in the surround I'll usually use a dab of RTV.
     
  9. vibroverbus

    vibroverbus Member

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    small repairs where the cone paper is 100% intact I go elmers, I just did one recently it hadn't even really torn yet but there was a stress point that had obviously been 'poked' with something sharp (like a mounting screw?).

    one trick is to water the elmers down so it isn't too stiff and it soaks deeper into the existing fibers.

    on small repairs use the lightest paper - tissue etc. working up to heavier papers for bigger issues, but being careful not to create a stiff spot. I've heard of using a bit of gauze for fiber to bridge across a gap. bigger issues and surrounds also can call for glue with more body but still flexible - silicone for instance...
     
  10. megatonic

    megatonic Silver Supporting Member

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    Nail polish and toilet paper will do in a pinch.
     
  11. Reeek

    Reeek Member

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    I forgot to add that I do the repair from the back of the cone.
     
  12. unklmickey

    unklmickey Member

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    WHERE the tear or hole is, determines what material is appropriate for the repair.

    if it is in the suspension (as indicated in the original post), then something flexible is appropriate.

    if it is in the cone itself, then something rigid is appropriate.
     

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