Replacing Fingerboard on Gibson ES-333

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by gtrfinder, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. gtrfinder

    gtrfinder Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,428
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Is this even possible?
    I like my 333 just fine, but I've always loved an ES-type guitar with block inlays instead of dots. How much does something like this cost, if even offered at all?
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Rosewood

    Rosewood Member

    Messages:
    1,875
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Replacing the inlays only would be the way to go.
     
  3. gtrfinder

    gtrfinder Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,428
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    How do I go about that?
     
  4. HammyD

    HammyD Member

    Messages:
    4,811
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Find a good tech with a router... its just woodworking. They can buy the inlays from someone like StewMac and trace the outline or make a template. The key is someone who really knows what he is doing!

    I did like the look of the block inlays on my old 335!
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2008
  5. HRydarcik

    HRydarcik Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Yep...the key is getting the template lined up exactly right...it has to be centered perfectly and parallel with the frets...plus even with a router the corners of the route will have to be squared up with a good sharp chisel...a home do-it-yourselfer could do it... but I'd rather pay a pro to do it.
     
  6. gtrfinder

    gtrfinder Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,428
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Great.
    Onle last question. What would be the charge for something like this?
     
  7. Patrick Ginnaty

    Patrick Ginnaty Member

    Messages:
    1,045
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Location:
    Maine
    A lot cheaper than replacing the fingerboard!
     
  8. Bob V

    Bob V Member

    Messages:
    1,191
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Location:
    Glen Head, New York
    It doesn't just so happen that you need a fret job at the same time? If the frets are removed it's a lot easier to sand the new inlays flush with the fingerboard after they're glued in, especially as you get up higher on the neck and there's not much room between the frets. Just doing initials or a signature at the 12th fret can be a real chore. The replacement inlay sets you see in the luthiery catalogs are meant to be popped into existing mortises left behind by the old inlays, so if you're putting something new in there they all have to be traced and routed and sanded flush. So there's some work involved, but it's certainly possible if you have a good tech who can show examples of their inlay work. Incidentally you'll likely be putting in celluloid or acrylic block inlays whereas the little dots were probably real mother of pearl or abalone.
     

Share This Page