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Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Michael_V, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Michael_V

    Michael_V Supporting Member

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    ...to stop noodling over the same old scales and patterns I've been playing for YEARS and learn one new lick every time I practice. Starting with TGPer jmcerlain's 50 Blues Rock Guitar Licks You MUST Know.
     
  2. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Well, why not create your own licks or riffs? Everything's been done 1000 times over. If you make it up, at least it will be new to you instead of copied, if you create it from your own inspirations. It's WAY more rewarding and personal.
     
  3. Michael_V

    Michael_V Supporting Member

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    Brother, I have done that my whole life, and I am dead tired of hearing myself play the same phrases and patterns. It's time to fill up my tool box with some new ideas. Once learned, I will make them mine.
     
  4. Seraphine

    Seraphine Member

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    Listening to different music will give you different ideas eh? Have you been listening to the same thing? Granted much music, especially these days, sounds like they are produced from the same factory and same office in the factory lol... but there's a lot of variety to find and play... as well as making your own music.. and hearing your own music that doesn't sound like 50 other tunes....

    What bands do you like... genres and styles... musicians.. etc?
     
  5. Michael_V

    Michael_V Supporting Member

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    This has been ongoing for me. I have been the guitarist for more worship teams than I can shake a stick at and have done so on and off for over ten years now. I generally learn three to five new songs a week, and I try to play them as recorded, so I do pick up a lot of technique that way. I also know more music theory than your average player and always try to understand why things work. I can accompany and improvise on rhythm quite comfortably using inversions and chord substitutions, but when I am left to improvise lead lines... well, then I start noodling over the same old modal patterns and doing the same old phrases, none of which are very clever. It's time for me to be a bit less independent in my musical thinking and start copping other people's stuff and making it my own, you know? So instead of practicing in the same old ruts I have been in for years now, I have resolved to spend some time each practice learning a lick from someone else, and Jeff's course seems like a great place to start.
     
  6. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    I understand you want to find some new ideas, but the old give a man a fish vs. teach a man to fish thing comes to mind. To really get new licks, it's in your mind, not even on your fingerboard. You're talking about patterns and familar memorized things, and then you're going to go and do it again.... That gets old fast. Everything's been done, just put own stamp on things and do it your way, and learn to play it differently every time. Just like we speak, it's not rehearsed, it's off the cuff and fresh everyday.
    Listen to music like Seraphine is suggesting, soaking it up like a sponge, and then wring that sponge out through those notes that are waiting inside your guitar. The real key is to hear the music in your head before it comes out. Then it all happens.
    Also try this simple approach for some instant creativity. Take just one same old, favorite, yet tired lick that you do, and instead,

    do it with open strings,
    do it with rhythmic displacement,
    do it with only one finger,
    do it with a slide,
    do it in a different position
    do it with ghost bends
    do it with open tuning
    do it so each note is on a different string
    do it with a ______,

    ... just do it as Nike says. You can make infinite variations on one single lick. Before you know it, you'll have so many new licks you've never played before, in a minutes. And you'll probably like all if them because they're all from the same parent lick that you dug in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012

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