Reverb "boings" too fast

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by mbruffey, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. mbruffey

    mbruffey Supporting Member

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    The reverb on my new 65 fender twin ri "boings" too fast. It sounds great otherwise. Is there any way to slow it down? Thanks, Mark
     
  2. Wakarusa

    Wakarusa Member

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    Boings too fast? Not sure what that means. Too much reverb too fast? Too long a tail on the reverberation?
     
  3. sosomething

    sosomething Member

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    Get a longer reverb tank.
     
  4. donnyjaguar

    donnyjaguar Member

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    Have a look inside and see if one of the springs is broken. Usually there are 2 springs and they have different rates of decay. One long and one short (duh!). The reason for the 2 springs becomes evident if you silence one of them and listen to the difference.

    DJ
     
  5. pfrischmann

    pfrischmann Member

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    I've always wondered if there was a substitute tank you could use to smooth out the reverb on fender amps. (in my case, a super)
     
  6. Wakarusa

    Wakarusa Member

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    All kinds of substitute tanks you can use. Simplest substitutions vary delay times and number of springs. Fancier changes can alter input and output impedance. However, some of the best tricks to either smooth out or give a more usable range for a Fender reverb involve modifying the driver and recovery circuits. One fairly simple mod that can make a world of difference is the installation of a dwell control.
     
  7. mbruffey

    mbruffey Supporting Member

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    Sorry, late getting back to this question. I mean there is not enough time between each individual "echo." It sounds like it's in too big a hurry, not "lush" enough, if that helps. I'd rather have fewer echos further between.

    Are there any potentiometer adjustments in the amp that can affect the dwell? Schematic appears to show a few in the reverb area, but i don't know exactly what they're for . . . .

    Thanks,

    Mark
     
  8. Wakarusa

    Wakarusa Member

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    Dwell affects more the "tail" of the reverberations (how long it takes for things to decay off), not the delay time. As far as I know the delay time is fixed for a given reverb tank. If you need longer delays you might want a digital pedal. To add adjustable dwell, replace the fixed 1 Meg resistor from grid to ground on the reverb driver with a 1 Meg potentiometer.
     
  9. TheAmpNerd

    TheAmpNerd Member

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    Yes, the 6 spring med delay.
    Change the caps and bias resistor
    of the driver tube.

    Really smooths it out. There
    are some other tricks as well.

    These are amoung some of the changes
    I make to fender circuits that folks end
    up saying the amp's sound F***ing Amazing.

    But don't take my word for it.

    Call Matt and ask him what Spike
    of Vintage Tube Amp Service
    did for his BF Super Reverb.

    214.608.7110.

    Then if I can assist pop me an
    email or PM.



     
  10. mbruffey

    mbruffey Supporting Member

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    It seems to me that it would be awfully neat to build a couple of little circuit boards with multi position switches, one with various resistor values and another with various cap values, solder that baby inline with circuit "x," and just mix and match at will . . . .
     

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