Reverb tank questions

ccoker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,756
my head, a Rivera R30 has a short reverb tank, tube driven
about 9x2.5
it has 8bb3c1b stamped on it

would switching to a long spring reverb make the reverb decays longer?

I want the reverb to last longer and keep it low in the mix
that's what I always did using digital verbs

I like that big expansive sound verb gives but like it low in the mix so I don't hear the "spash" of it on the attack of the notes...

if so..
which tank would be the best?
and of course, the cheapest place to get it?

thanks!
 

Wakarusa

Member
Messages
1,459
Go here to decode the serial number for your tank. The long version would be a type 4 (4 spring) or type 9 (6 spring). You want to make sure you match the input and output impedance specs for the existing type 8 tank (2nd and 3rd digits).

While it's tempting to go for the type 9 it can be overkill if the amp doesn't have a dwell control, so it's usually best to start with the type 4.
 

VintageJon

Member
Messages
153
Have sent your model # to shop and will check there tomorrow for delay time etc...
Expect to reply tomorrow...

Short tanks can be as efective as long tanks if they are driven/recovered correctly. There have been many bad reverb designs to date, the brown board Pro Jr comes to mind...

-Jon
 

VintageJon

Member
Messages
153
Your 8BB3C1B accutronics decodes as
8:3 spring
B:190 Ohm input Z
B:2.25K output Z
3:Long Delay
C:Input isolated/Output grounded
1:no lock
B:horizontal side down

hope this helps,
Jon
 

donnyjaguar

Member
Messages
4,201
I think the obvious thing to do is modify the circuit of your amp to drive the reverb harder. The springs have a compression effect on the signal so you'd end up with more decay. I did this to one amplifier and ended up with more reverb than I knew what to do with.

DJ
 

Wakarusa

Member
Messages
1,459
donnyjaguar said:
I think the obvious thing to do is modify the circuit of your amp to drive the reverb harder. The springs have a compression effect on the signal so you'd end up with more decay. I did this to one amplifier and ended up with more reverb than I knew what to do with.

DJ
This is exactly the idea behind a dwell control (and why subbing 9 spring tanks into amps without one often doesn't turn out well). The setup is usually to have a strong driving amplifier and put the dwell control (just a pot) in the grid/base circuit of the driver.

Also helps to keep in mind that when driving a reverb tank delivering current is the trick, not voltage. The Accutronics site has a pretty good write-up on all of this, though all of the examples are solid state.
 




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