Rhythm Changes, swing swing swing!

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
It's fun way to play rhythm changes with
simple 3 notes voicings.(Rt 3rd 7th).

Mostly Rt & guide tone (3rd & 7th).

Someplace I play dim7 chord or 3rd bass(3rd Rt 5th)
5th (on 6th string) 3rd & 7th on 4th & 3rd strings.

Keep your metronome on 2 & 4.
Practice very slow to in order to play fast.

SRV Strat front pickjup

Fuchs 50 clean CH.

Bob Burt V-front cab.

Eminence 's Tonespotter.

Hope you enjoy this.

SRV Strat FastSwingGroove

If you want to hear Funky Ukulele, here.
Funky Ukulele

Version R guitar (Sakashta guitars)
Walking bass line stuff.
Fuchs 50 great jazz tone F jazz blues walking bass line

Tomo
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by Unburst
Super cool playing Tomo.

Unburst,

Thank you so much!

I thought you were asking about give away some
tabs? That's ok, if you want to teach people
basic chord changes.

My playing of this was more improvised
part so you can't present exactly unless you transcribe
it.

Bridge is pretty much
D7....
G7....
C7...
F7...
but I use some hamonized bass like Jim Hall.

A section is basically

Bb7 G7 C-7 F7 Bb7 G7 C-7 F7
Bb7 Bb/D Eb7 Edim D-7 G7 C-7 F7

but you can play Bb7 Bdin7 C-7 C#dim7.....
many possible way... sometime you can just play
Bb7 one chord.

Thank you for listening.

PS, I don't mind whatever you use it(tabs)
but make sure colors on each note... degrees
are very very important. Rt 3rd 7th or Rt 7th 3rd..


Tomo
 

Unburst

Member
Messages
4,215
Originally posted by Tomo
Unburst,

Thank you so much!

I thought you were asking about give away some
tabs? That's ok, if you want to teach people
basic chord changes.

My playing of this was more improvised
part so you can't present exactly unless you transcribe
it.

Tomo
Hi Tomo

I liked it so much that I did transcribe it, I've been using it in my practice routine.
The chord shapes and movement are very cool.
Gives a great insight to Django-style swing rhythm shapes.

If anyone's interested, I'd be glad to share the tab with them.
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by Unburst
Hi Tomo

I liked it so much that I did transcribe it, I've been using it in my practice routine.
The chord shapes and movement are very cool.
Gives a great insight to Django-style swing rhythm shapes.

If anyone's interested, I'd be glad to share the tab with them.


Hi Unburst,

Thank you for telling me how much you liked it.
I like to practice this way too. I set a half note at
42,52,62,72,82,92.... many tunes.

Actually I am gonna put more examples at my website
sound clips section. Now you can hear some funky Ukulele.

I would like to get the tab myself. It's really nice of you
giving away your tab.

Thank you.

PS, Please check

Tomo's guitar clinic


Tomo
 

Unburst

Member
Messages
4,215
Originally posted by Tomo
Hi Unburst,

I would like to get the tab myself. It's really nice of you
giving away your tab.

Thank you.

Tomo
Here you go, hope you don't mind me posting this here.

 

rh

Robo Sapien NoiseMaker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,781
Not to distract from Tomo:

There's a good book for this kind of comping:

All Blue for Jazz Guitar: Comping Styles, Chords & Grooves

Jim Ferguson. ISBN 0-7866-3128-7 Distributed by Mel Bay

It's the reference always cited on rec.music.makers.guitar.jazz whenever someone asks about jazz guitar comping styles.

Ferguson doesn't have Tomo's right hand, but there's a CD and the material is presented very clearly. It's an excellent and comprehensive coverage of a broad range of "jazz comping" styles.

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/pages...sic/detail/MB.96842BCD.html&t=&k=&r=wwws-err5

http://www.accentonmusic.com/book_detail.asp?qID=28

Table of Contents:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/078...1008636?_encoding=UTF8&p=S005&j=0#reader-page
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by Unburst
Here you go, hope you don't mind me posting this here.


Hi Martin,

Thank you for posting!

Excellent job. You have great ears.
Passing diminish..... Harmonized bass line...
I love those sound.

Thank you so much!

PS, Everybody please thank Martin for great
transcription.


Tomo
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by mwoeppel
Guys,

Thanks so much for sharing. This is a great place with great people!

Mark

Hi Mark,

Thank you for checking out.

I highly recommend Rt 3rd 7th form for jazz swing. Many people think jazz is too hard
or need to know theory, be able to read music in order to play jazz?

There is friendly way to play, understand jazz harmony.
Good luck with this swing Rt 3 7 chord forms.

Tomo
 

mwoeppel

Member
Messages
333
Originally posted by Tomo
Hi Mark,

Thank you for checking out.

I highly recommend Rt 3rd 7th form for jazz swing. Many people think jazz is too hard
or need to know theory, be able to read music in order to play jazz?

There is friendly way to play, understand jazz harmony.
Good luck with this swing Rt 3 7 chord forms.

Tomo
That would be lesson 19a!!! on my music stand right now.

Mark
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by scottl
Great rhythm lesson Tomo-San!

Thank you Scott san!

Glad you liked it. I love grooving on guitar.
That's my daily routine to start my day.

I will be playing at Berklee performance center
tonight.

with Kenwood Dennard, David Cowan (do you remember
him?) Very funky music!

SRV strat funk groove#1


Tomo
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by rh
Not to distract from Tomo:

There's a good book for this kind of comping:

All Blue for Jazz Guitar: Comping Styles, Chords & Grooves

Jim Ferguson. ISBN 0-7866-3128-7 Distributed by Mel Bay

It's the reference always cited on rec.music.makers.guitar.jazz whenever someone asks about jazz guitar comping styles.

Ferguson doesn't have Tomo's right hand, but there's a CD and the material is presented very clearly. It's an excellent and comprehensive coverage of a broad range of "jazz comping" styles.

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/pages...sic/detail/MB.96842BCD.html&t=&k=&r=wwws-err5

http://www.accentonmusic.com/book_detail.asp?qID=28

Table of Contents:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/078...1008636?_encoding=UTF8&p=S005&j=0#reader-page
Hi Richard,

Thank you for the info.

I just like to show anyone to play simply way of swing Rt 3 7 chords.
Keep it simple is key. So that you can change to Maj7 to min7
or Dom7. In order to control this style, you don't have to worry
about tensions now. You can add them on 1st , 2nd strings later.
(adding color). First we should check into basic color of changes.

Play Root on 6th or 5th strings.

Play 3rd & 7th on 4th and 3rd strings.

Rt 7 3 from 6th string root
Rt 3 7 from 5th string root.

For Major7= M3 & M7
For min7 = b3 & b7
For Dom7= M3 & b7

Beside just memorize those forms, it's better to analyze them.

Thanks


Tomo
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by mwoeppel
That would be lesson 19a!!! on my music stand right now.

Mark

Hi Mark,

Exactly!

Ex 19a is the one. But that is general idea, so that
you want to find your pace, your tempo.

I usually suggest 45 at a half nore instead of 60
like in my dvd. I practice at 40, 42.... it's tough
to keep in tempo and relax really well. But more
you do slow , you can make faster later.

Great to hear from you again.

PS, I will make more examples like lessons.
Check out my website "Sound clips" section,
more to come (for my students) feel free to
listen them.


Tomo


Tomo
 

Bryan T

guitar owner
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,889
Originally posted by Unburst
Gives a great insight to Django-style swing rhythm shapes.
This is a great thread! I do a lot of comping like this if there isn't a bass player - for a solo guitar piece, for example. If there is a bass player, you can just drop the root and play the 3rd/7th, plus other "color" tones.

By the way, a lot of the characteristic "gypsy jazz" sound comes from playing in minor keys. Additionally, the won't play minor seventh voicings, but instead will play minor sixth voicings.

So, instead of Amin7:

5x55xx

they'll play Amin6:

5x45xx
A basic minor blues "gypsy jazz" style might be made up of Amin6, Dmin6 (same chord shape, but at the tenth fret), and E7. A popular E7 voicing is:

7x67xx

Notice that this has the fifth in the bass and is the same shape as the min6 chords. The function of that voicing depends entirely on context.

Bryan
 

Unburst

Member
Messages
4,215
Originally posted by Tomo
Hi Martin,

Thank you for posting!

Excellent job. You have great ears.
Passing diminish..... Harmonized bass line...
I love those sound.

Thank you so much!
Tomo
Thanks Tomo, it was a lot of fun.

The harmonized bass lines are great.
 

Tomo

Member
Messages
16,611
Originally posted by Bryan T
This is a great thread! I do a lot of comping like this if there isn't a bass player - for a solo guitar piece, for example. If there is a bass player, you can just drop the root and play the 3rd/7th, plus other "color" tones.

By the way, a lot of the characteristic "gypsy jazz" sound comes from playing in minor keys. Additionally, the won't play minor seventh voicings, but instead will play minor sixth voicings.

So, instead of Amin7:

5x55xx

they'll play Amin6:

5x45xx
A basic minor blues "gypsy jazz" style might be made up of Amin6, Dmin6 (same chord shape, but at the tenth fret), and E7. A popular E7 voicing is:

7x67xx

Notice that this has the fifth in the bass and is the same shape as the min6 chords. The function of that voicing depends entirely on context.

Bryan

Hi Bryan,

Glad to hear that you liked this thread.
Martin did great transcription! Great job!

Thanks for sharing about gypsy jazz. I will make
some minor tune next time. I like your
notation by numbers like 5X55XXX.

Another Rt 3 7 th idea,
F blues
F jazz blues
F Paker blues,

I usually teach these very simple way to another
level. So that my student will creat his own idea
later, not memorised just shapes.

From F blues to F jazz blues to Parker blues

Tomo
 

Greggy

Member
Messages
13,440
Originally posted by Bryan T
This is a great thread! I do a lot of comping like this if there isn't a bass player - for a solo guitar piece, for example. If there is a bass player, you can just drop the root and play the 3rd/7th, plus other "color" tones.

By the way, a lot of the characteristic "gypsy jazz" sound comes from playing in minor keys. Additionally, the won't play minor seventh voicings, but instead will play minor sixth voicings.

So, instead of Amin7:

5x55xx

they'll play Amin6:

5x45xx
A basic minor blues "gypsy jazz" style might be made up of Amin6, Dmin6 (same chord shape, but at the tenth fret), and E7. A popular E7 voicing is:

7x67xx

Notice that this has the fifth in the bass and is the same shape as the min6 chords. The function of that voicing depends entirely on context.

Bryan
Love the min6. I've used it in a couple of my songs. Great thread. Thanks for sharing the knowledge.
 




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