Roasted Necks (maple) - why not roast all the other woods - school me

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by cherrick, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    In the long run, the big payoff with it will be in the ability to make soft woods harder for more usefulness out of fast growing woods for the mass market.
    It's already heavily marketed for decks, siding and fencing, as it's water resistant with no chemicals and no re-treatment necessary.
    For guitars, I predict roasted basswood and pine bodies becoming more common. Already light, if they can be made as hard as, say, mahogany, they become pretty attractive.
     
  2. mattmccloskey

    mattmccloskey Supporting Member

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    I would like to try it.

    If a roasted maple neck is totally stable despite weather changes, that seems like a win. Set your truss rod for the perfect amount of relief, and once you have it dialed in, you can leave it alone.

    From what I understand, it also does not require a finish, or at the least a minimal finish. That could be a plus as well.
     
  3. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Member

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    I generally agree with you and don't know a thing about roasted maple, but I have to disagree here; lots of improvements in both materials and design have been made and recognized by those in the know, but the overall guitar playing public has been slow to adopt. We tend to want to stick to the classics...
     
  4. straycat113

    straycat113 Member

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    I have two guitars with RM necks from the first run EBMM did which also have Ebony fretboards. Keeping it real I was sold mainly on the look and did not know much about the science behind it until I was waiting for them. It is a special process done to the wood at the lumberyard and no you can't do it in a regular oven. The longer the process is done the darker the wood gets, which were the early Suhr Vulkanized necks. They also are not as stable which is why Suhr did away with them. The process makes the wood 1/3 lighter by drawing out the sap and moisture in the wood while making it stronger. I am not an expert on wood or a luthier but I do have good ears and all I can say is that those two guitars are two of the best sounding and playing guitars I own out of 30, with one most likely the best. I have a lot of respect for Ron and John Suhr is one of the coolest guys I ever talked with on the internet and both have forgot more about building guitars then I know. But they are on opposite sides on the benefits of roasted wood and John knows pretty much all there is to know about it's benefits and the process. If anyone wants to read what Johns take is on it just do a 'search' as he goes into deep details.
     
  5. Motorhed

    Motorhed Member

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    OK, roasting makes maple darker, I think someone needs to develop a process to make rosewood lighter. Just imagine, a baked maple neck darkened to the shade of rosewood with a fretboard made of rosewood lightened to the shade of maple. It'd blow minds, man! .....or not.
     
  6. Cal Webway

    Cal Webway Member

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    Yes, the Finns, thru university research kinda pioneered the roasted-cell-structure-drying thang
    I recall reading about it... 10+ yrs ago maybe
     
  7. DCross

    DCross Supporting Member

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    Whose woods these are?
    It looks like roasted necks are not too hard to get, but I'm intrigued by a roasted pine body - because regular pine is too soft for my taste... anyone know where they can be had??
     
  8. MollyPolly

    MollyPolly Senior Member

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    I don't think anyone has really addressed one of the main questions in the OP, which is: why not do it with other woods?

    Based on what I've read, it would seem to be beneficial for all woods, and especially for softer acoustic top woods like Spruce and Cedar.

    Does anyone know if someone has built an all-baked guitar? or an acoustic with a baked top?
     
  9. Ape Factory

    Ape Factory Member

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    The above makes me wonder if everyone is in fact using the same process. I'm not sure Warmoth or any other neck manufacturer would put out a product they know is less stable and would create more warranty claims. Since the process was developed to make wood MORE stable and lower warranty issues, this seems rather strange to me.

    I believe Roukangas does or did? I think they use Spanish Cedar in their builds too.
     
  10. MollyPolly

    MollyPolly Senior Member

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    I did some further digging on this, and according to Suhr, at the molecular level, roasted wood is similar to 350-year-old wood.

    If that's true, and it's also impervious to humidity/climate changes, it seems almost impossible to believe that acoustic builders haven't adopted it.

    Bob Taylor, a major innovator in terms of trying new techniques and methods in guitar building, has been shouting from the rooftops about the importance of humidifying solid-wood acoustics for as long as I can remember.

    if anyone would be open to the possibility of utilizing materials that are impervious to humidity fluctuations, it would be Bob.

    But I've never heard or read anything about it from him, or any other major player in the acoustic world.

    Something is missing from the discussion. There must be a reason roasting hasn't been more widely adopted across wood species other than maple.

    I would love to hear John Suhr's thoughts on this. I'll bet he's even discussed it with Bob.
     
  11. vpolineni

    vpolineni Member

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  12. MollyPolly

    MollyPolly Senior Member

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  13. Drewski

    Drewski Silver Supporting Member

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    I believe it is an option at the Martin Custom Shop as well. The acoustic world is adopting torrified woods pretty much across the board.
     
  14. CS'56

    CS'56 Member

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    Are there any links to this? I did a search and could only find Husky stating that they are very stable. I would like to read about why he changed his mind.
     
  15. tone?

    tone? Member

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    When did he say they weren't stable?

    Never heard that
     
  16. CS'56

    CS'56 Member

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    That's what I would like to know.
     
  17. Gevalt

    Gevalt Member

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    Man, just a little roasting of neck & body could level the playing field for vintage/new. In my mind, aged wood is the best thing about vintage instruments. I've played a few guitars at shops, that are so dampened, they seem to have too much moisture in the wood.

    There was a house torn down near me, there was a new maple 2x4 next to a bunch of old ones from the house. I dropped a few pieces of old wood to compare with the fresh. Old goes ding, new goes pluh. Of course, guitar wood is usually hard already, but aging goes a long way.
     
  18. old goat

    old goat Member

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  19. DrGonzo

    DrGonzo Gold Supporting Member

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    I've been super curious about the whole roasted/baked maple thing for awhile, so I finally have a Suhr Classic T with a roasted maple neck on the way. I like the idea of it, but who knows until you try it for yourself. If the neck feels good and is stable, I'd definitely consider a body with the same treatment. A roasted pine tele body sounds interesting...
     
  20. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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