Roasted necks... worth it?

Stratman Dan

Member
Messages
186
Worth it?
Tone?
Marketing hype?
Game changer?


1) Yes - It adds value/resale value. Although, i prefer to my maple smoked over roasted as it gives the sound a more intense and bold flavor.

2) Yes - A roasted neck omits a more mellower tone, and fades into a smooth finish within the inner ear

3) Yes - They want your money, and will do and say anything to get you to part with it.

4) Yes - The question is what will they think of next.....roasted bodies? ......wait a minute....:stir
 

gkoelling

Member
Messages
17,004
Yes! I love the way my unfinished roasted Tele neck feels!!


As the title of my thread about replacing with the roasted neck reveals, there was an obvious tonal change between my former, non-roasted and my new roasted necks.
I've experienced dramatic tone changes in a Tele due to a neck change but neither neck was roasted. It's difficult to say the roasting was what made the difference in your guitar. Having said that, I'd like to try a roasted neck someday.
 

Blanket Jackson

is Tio's favorite
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15,641
Torrified

Osmosis resistant. Torrified (also spelled “torrefied”) wood neither swells up during humid summer months nor dries out due to dry winter air. Torrified wood will not shrink, warp, expand, or contract due to changing weather or humidity levels.

Torrified wood has been heat treated or roasted until it has nearly 0% internal moisture. The wood will not reabsorb moisture because its structure has been altered as a result of the heating process. This is not a chemical process, and it affects the wood all the way through, to its core. The wood can be sanded, shaped, cut, or otherwise processed — or even scratched or dented — without losing the effects of the treatment. The heat treatment can also enhance the visual appeal of the wood.

Several guitar manufacturers have begun using torrified maple necks on their instruments.

( ref: https://www.sweetwater.com/insync/torrified/)
 

Badtone

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,083
Take your time when installing tuners, with particular care given to drilling for screw holes. Consider the diameter precautions Warmoth provides, and measure twice before drilling once...
Thanks; I'd heard they can be a bit brittle. Care will be taken :aok
 

Timbre Wolf

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I've experienced dramatic tone changes in a Tele due to a neck change but neither neck was roasted. It's difficult to say the roasting was what made the difference in your guitar. Having said that, I'd like to try a roasted neck someday.
True - I cannot attribute the change to the roasting, since I didn't try the new neck un-roasted first. And any neck change can potentially lead to a new sonic character. So I just report my data point, for anyone interested.
 
Messages
1,674
Love the look, LOVE the feel (that's the best part), like the extra stability, love the smell! (Like maple syrup/vanilla).
Also makes it lighter.
Ordered my neck and alder body roasted for weight alone, on my custom Suhr
 
Messages
1,448
Love roasted and would get it over plain maple every time. The aesthetic, the feel, super cool. Not sure it’s a game changer per se but I’d pay extra for it if available. Currently have 3 roasted neck guitars at all different price points and they’re all great; Anderson, Kiesel, Reverend.
 

Steve-O

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
104
Torrified

Osmosis resistant. Torrified (also spelled “torrefied”) wood neither swells up during humid summer months nor dries out due to dry winter air. Torrified wood will not shrink, warp, expand, or contract due to changing weather or humidity levels.

Torrified wood has been heat treated or roasted until it has nearly 0% internal moisture. ...
According to that wiki article Blanket Jackson linked torrification is done in an oxygen free environment.

“Torrefaction is a thermochemical treatment of biomass at 200 to 320 °C (392 to 608ºF). It is carried out under atmospheric pressure and in the absence of oxygen, i.e. with no air.”

If that’s the case, I doubt any guitar manufacturers have access to an oxygen free vacuum oven to “roast” their necks. That would seem really expensive.

The Sweetwater article states that torrification is not a chemical reaction while the Wiki article says it is a Thermochemical reaction. Sounds like marketing to me unless the wiki article is wrong...
 
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Blanket Jackson

is Tio's favorite
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According to that wiki article you linked torrification is done in an oxygen free environment.

“Torrefaction is a thermochemical treatment of biomass at 200 to 320 °C (392 to 608ºF). It is carried out under atmospheric pressure and in the absence of oxygen, i.e. with no air.”

If that’s the case, I doubt any guitar manufacturers have access to an oxygen free vacuum oven to “roast” their necks. That would seem really expensive.
The excerpt is from Sweetwater's website. I can understand your confusion, since I included the link at the bottom.

I can also understand your confusion around "oxygen-free". Industrial anaerobic processing services are routinely available these days ....

http://mectorrefaction.com/

http://www.torrefactionplus.ca/en/our-services/


In all seriousness (no more sarcasm), there is enough of a market for this service now that it is fairly common. A lot of the wood used for guitars comes from Canada these days, and those crafty Canadians (I mean that in a good way) figured out that they can provide services beyond merely cutting the big trees down. We are the better for it!
 
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Messages
714
the only experience ive had with one was on a sublime tomcat deluxe. while pretty, it was actually MORE unstable than any other neck ive tried. it took very little to wiggle the neck out of tune. in fact, i had to put effort into NOT pulling on the neck while playing to not make it go out of tune.
 

line_rider

Member
Messages
102
I've used several and I go with them because I like the way they look enough that I don't mind the small up-charge.

No effect regarding tone. I have a guitar I've had many different necks on, currently has a Brazilian ebony neck with black ebony fretboard, sounds exactly the same as it did with the roasted maple and rosewood fretboard.
 

ChipOnly

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,907
I think they're worth it. Feel great, stable, what's not to like?

Worth it a question of expense, ultimately. Like, if a roasted maple neck is another $10, maybe they ask you at the register if you wanna upgrade today, that's one thing. But is it worth another $300+ to replace a tele neck with a roasted one, solely for that reason? Something else. But considering the neck is arguably part you physically interact with most as a player, and you just lurrrrve the feel of roasted, heck, I can see that as being worth it too. Especially if it represents maybe a gig's pay or something. And you can recoup $150 out of the old neck. But I digress...

I wonder, cause it seems to me the added expense doesn't seem to be that high. If you are guitar shopping, you can get into something with a roasted neck for not a ton of bread (below $1k easy) - it comes standard on all the reverends IIRC (I guess they think it's worth it), it's on some of upper triple digit charvel and Ibanez models. Manufacturers seem to be responding to demand, and/or have identified roastage as an inexpensive process resulting in a marketable feature that they can turn a profit on.

For a laugh, and this isn't scientific, maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I just checked and on a warmoth custom tele neck it's like the first thing you select. With no other options selected, the price diff between a maple neck and fretboard vs roasted maple neck and fretboard is another $40 ($157 vs $197). That's at US/1st world labor costs, it represents an additional 25% cost to consumer, with profit taking built in.
 

Steve-O

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
104
The excerpt is from Sweetwater's website. I can understand your confusion, since I included the link at the bottom.

...

In all seriousness (no more sarcasm), there is enough of a market for this service now that it is fairly common.
I realized the quote was from Sweetwater and modified my origin post before I saw your reply.

I had no idea that it was fairly common... thanks for sharing.:)
 

TuffyKohler

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
234
Yup, roasted maple is not that uncommon, or that expensive really. I picked up an 8' piece of flamed roasted maple, 1"x4.5". $28. good for 2 one piece necks with a piece left over.

A stick of flamed maple the same size is only a couple bucks cheaper.
 

Blanket Jackson

is Tio's favorite
Silver Supporting Member
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15,641
I realized the quote was from Sweetwater and modified my origin post before I saw your reply.

I had no idea that it was fairly common... thanks for sharing.:)
It's really cool that we have access to such advanced materials and processes these days. It's like medicines and computers - breakthroughs eventually become commonplace.

I did not share before but I do have a couple guitars with torrified maple necks, the most recent of which was the Rob Radack built "Drunken Tele". From what I understand Rob offers torrified necks as a standard option. https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?threads/ngd-new-custom-build-radack-drunken-tele-redwood-foilbuckers.1944109/
 

FPFL

Member
Messages
2,480
Stability for me is reason #1.

My roasted neck Suhr has not needed any adjustment since I got it setup the way I like when I bought it, what, four years ago? That's worth it.
 

wox

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,548
My 2 cents:

Unfinished necks are wonderful feeling, huge plus for me.

I don't notice anything about the tone of the necks that I can obviously attribute to the roasted-ness of it - not sure how this would be identified or measured - it's a new neck.

I have roasted guitars (yes, even with SS frets) that sound wonderful, thick and fat and loud.

I don't generally have a stability problem with any of my necks, but I suppose any extra stability is appreciated.

I've heard complaints of brittle headstocks where undersized tuner holes can split the wood. I can see how roasting exacerbates the problem, but this can happen on any headstock. Drill the holes right, ream them properly, and you won't have a problem.
 




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