Roland Kirk, what a badass

DrumBob

Gold Supporting Member
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16,630
Well, he was one of a kind, for sure. I remember reading about him back when I was a kid. I bought second hand copies of Downbeat and he would be featured now and then. Roland played some wild horns called the manzello and the stritch, that were never used in jazz.
 

tapeworm

Supporting Member
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8,118
Certainly a very unique musician and I’d have to imagine he was quite a unique person as well. I know I sure do love his music. When I first discovered him about 10 years ago I spent several months trying to listen to and digest all his music that I could find. Great tone and music that takes you on a journey. Here’s two of my favs.

 

Trevordog

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3,557
I saw him on TV when I was a little boy, on the WNET program, "Soul!"
He played a song called "Blacknuss", which had a melody that just used the black notes on the piano, and then he destroyed a fold-up chair after he was done.
You haven't seen anything until you've seen a huge, blind, black man destroy a fold-up chair!
 

Trevordog

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3,557
I saw him on TV when I was a little boy, on the WNET program, "Soul!"
He played a song called "Blacknuss", which had a melody that just used the black notes on the piano, and then he destroyed a fold-up chair after he was done.
You haven't seen anything until you've seen a huge, blind, black man destroy a fold-up chair!
Here he is, destroying the chair at 37:25 into it:
 

Stratosphere

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740
a long time fan, I only recently discovered that this is Rahsaan Roland Kirk playing the flute. His biggest exposure came 20 years after his death

Jethro Tull's flutist Ian Anderson largely owes his iconic style on that instrument, especially where he is vocalizing and grunting and whatnot along with it to Kirk. To his credit I've heard him acknowledging that.

Yeah, listen to some Roland's flute and it will be really familiar if you're a little familiar with Tull.

And his writing style of was interesting and varied. He left this world way too soon. The liner notes on an album he said that when he was gone he wanted to be cremated and have his ashes put into a big bag of pot and have all his friends smoke him up. If they did it was probably quite a high.
 

Carlo

Gold Supporting Member
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1,341
+1 The Return of the 5,000 lb Man !

On a hot summer night back in the 70s, around 2 am, lying on the couch, window open, a warm gentle breeze blowing in, lights off, listening to an FM station, Theme For the Eulipions comes on..........

I was never the same after that....I had entered The Twilight Zone!
 

Bluesra

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240
Love his music blew me away when i first heard him play a solid 30 second run without taking a breath
 

b_goatman

Silver Supporting Member
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1,290
I'm a huge fan of Rahsaan...love this tune where, according to Mingus he "Cuts George Adams at his own s**). George is at 6:16, Rahssan at
9:35. No slam on George, he's one of my favorite tenor players.
 

mad dog

Silver Supporting Member
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10,932
So many jazz greats. For me, Rahsaan is right up at the top. He was a historian of jazz, would give tutorials via solos. A fiery player, truly original. Plus, clearly a wacky, hilarious guy. "I'm talking about hip chops!!" I wore out several of his albums, never had the chance to see him.
 

BuddyGuit

Silver Supporting Member
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3,058
He also had the circular breathing thing under control. George Braith also played multiple horns at once. He wasn’t wacky like Kirk as best as can remember.
 

Don P.

Supporting Member
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3,385
Rahsaan is amazing, however I think that he gets penalized/dismissed for having a sense of humor kind of like Monk did in the first time people heard him. Anyway, if you haven’t seen it check out this film:

 

Trevordog

Member
Messages
3,557
I'm a huge fan of Rahsaan...love this tune where, according to Mingus he "Cuts George Adams at his own s**). George is at 6:16, Rahssan at
9:35. No slam on George, he's one of my favorite tenor players.
In the RRK biography, written by the guy that owned the Keystone Corner, Dave Liebman talks about how he got cut by RRK on ATTYA.
He had no mercy for the 'out' players that couldn't play inside. He'd tell them, "You got to play in, before you can play out!!"
 


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