rolling stones

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by TerryE, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. TerryE

    TerryE Member

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    Can someone recommend a book containing accurate transcriptions of songs of the Rolling Stones.

    Thanks,

    Terry
     
  2. Strat God

    Strat God Member

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    The new one coming out is titled:

    "I Snorted My Dead Father's Ashes"

    by Keef.
     
  3. ?&!

    ?&! Member

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    Accurate Stones transcriptions are hard to come by. The parts weave so tightly/loosely together that they kind of defy notation. I would suggest taking off your low E string, tuning to open-G, grabbing a capo, and diving in. Worked for me, and it was way more fun than reading tab. Good luck! :)
     
  4. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    it was so much about the interaction amongst the guitars, bass and drums. Transcribing it would be like orchestra scores.

    The advice given is probably the best way to go. Its Only Rock and Roll, but I like it, after all.:JAM
     
  5. MisterTV

    MisterTV Supporting Member

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    There's a guy in France who has done his own Stones transcriptions and audio files... about a dozen songs in all. They are VERY accurate and I found them to be immensely helpful in figuring out how to replicate Keith's open tunings.

    Best of all, it's online and it's FREE!!

    http://jptrol2.free.fr/rs/#orr
     
  6. Swain

    Swain Member

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    There is a pretty good Book/CD out. It's the "Signature Licks" series. I think it's from Hal Leonard.
     
  7. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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  8. koen

    koen Guest

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    I ordered the Exile on Main Street TAB book from Amazon - it's very accurate.
     
  9. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    "Stones..." "Accurate..." heh...

    My main gig for the past 2 years has been as a bass player in a Stones "tribute" band.

    In my 25+ years of playing bass, learning the "simple" songs and structures of the Rolling Stones has been one of the most difficult things I've done. Mainly because of fighting the instinct and urge to do what "should" work.

    The Stones aren't exactly "accurate," and that's kind of the key to that sound. They often don't do things the "right" way- and if you try to do it "right" or "better" it doesn't work. You lose that magic that the song conveys.

    Get the tuning and rhythm right for the Keith parts- and work off that. In thinking of whatever advice I could give- I found myself remembering what I've been doing wrong in following and keying off the drummer- exactly what I should not be doing. While there is an interraction between the rhythm guitar and drums- the songs more often than not drive off the rhythm guitar and not the bass and drums- and that's a big key to Stones tunes.

    Play loose, play slow, roll with and 'follow' the rhythm guitar. You can dumb things down and that will work better than if you try to make it more complex than it is.
     
  10. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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    Heh heh, it just may be possible that I am a born natural to do the Stones, if "accuracy" is a handicap. :banana:banana
    Yay, I've found my place in life.

    I'm waiting on a ton of Stones music, and I'm gonna dig in and get loose.
     
  11. koen

    koen Guest

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    LOL - yes you're right. But the book helps a lot with finding the right chord structures and voicings.

    Regarding the bass, Bill Wyman added an enormous amount of groove to their sound, but was never intruding. They kinda lost that swing with Daryl Jones. At one time Satisfaction was on the radio while in my car, and suddenly I heard the bass was played with the tiniest delay compared to the main riff. The drums follows the rhytm guitar, the bass follows the drums. But I'm sure you're well aware of this all :)

    I tried to play some Stones' songs with my band, and if the other players are not aware of the way their sound is achieved, it just doesn't sound right. So I always vetoed playing these song outside the rehearsal room. It's probably even better to do a completely different arrangement. Eg, I always liked this example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vi8E4rTfx4A
     
  12. townsend

    townsend Member

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    I really enjoyed this site. Thanks for the link!

    There is one source I would recommend to you, sight unseen unfortunately.

    It is the Lick Library Learn To Play The Rolling Stones, featuring five songs (Brown Sugar, Satisfaction, Honky Tonk Woman, Angie, Jumpin' Jack Flash). This one is done by Michael Casewell, a very fine guitarist.

    http://www.licklibrary.com/ProductDetail.aspx?Product=ymbbNQKdqhA=
     
  13. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    And that's where it gets good!!!
     
  14. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Right!
    It's not exactly the "tiniest" delay, though - it's an 8th note difference. Maybe Wyman had a different idea of how the rhythm ought to go from Keef - maybe it was deliberate.
    But even if it was an accidental looseness, that was what made those Stones songs great (as Golden Boy says). If they'd played the same rhythm, it wouldn't have sounded anywhere near as good.
    It took some years for Keef's playing to solidify into the killer riff machine it became in the late 60s/early 70s - with a perfect understanding of when chords needed to fall on the beat and when between the beats (syncopated). But he built it on the great drumming of Charlie Watts and the understated grooves of Bill Wyman - both unfussy but totally reliable.
     
  15. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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    I learnt Satisfaction recently, and the interesting bits are not the obvious refraining main riff. In behind, during the verses, there is this dull line playing, in a syncopated rhythm, which I struggled with a little. It's hard to hear on the recording, but I had a very good transcription, which had it notated accurately in standard as well as tab. As I started to read the ryhthm correctly, I realised it was very familiar. I knew it from another Stones song I knew, from Tattoo You. Once I realised that, it fell into place really quickly. I just name-checked the song. It's Slave, track 3.
    So, here's a tip, put a 4/4 beat on, and then play Slave over the top of it, and I reckon your "finding the groove" problems will be over.
    I haven't learnt any more Stones yet, but I bet my lefty that it will be a recurring theme. I would not be the slightest bit surprised to find this rhythm in any number of Stones songs.
    BTW, thanks at this point to James Hetfield for teaching me to play with syncopation over a 4/4.
     
  16. TerryE

    TerryE Member

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    Thanks everyone for the advice.

    One question more please. When did the Keith switch to open tunings? The very earliest work was all standard tuning, right?


    Terry
     
  17. koen

    koen Guest

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    Supposedly in the late 60's. They stopped touring for a while, and he started to explore different ways of playing guitar.
     
  18. Gretsch6136

    Gretsch6136 Member

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    I think Keith's first open tuning work was recorded for the Beggars Banquet album and Jumpin' Jack Flash single in '68. The person who was the main influence on Keith at that time was Gram Parsons who was quite familiar with open tunings. The following year, Ry Cooder was quite involved with The Stones for Let It Bleed. Apparently Ry Cooder was instrumental in the creation of Honky Tonk Woman.

    I haven't checked this out, but it is possible some open tunings were used on Satanic Majesties in '67. The song that is the most likely candidate is Citadel.

    Cheers,

    Mark
     
  19. MisterTV

    MisterTV Supporting Member

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    What's amazing to me is that Keith didn't create the signature "Stones" open tuning sound until a few years *after* the band was already a huge success. Has anyone else ever pulled off this feat? It would be like Van Halen not using two-handed tapping on the first two records.
     
  20. Dandy13

    Dandy13 Member

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    I don't think Keef even knows how half of these songs were played on the original recordings. I read or heard in an interview with him that he plays satisfaction and jack flash different every night. just rock it.
     

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