Rondo Music Sells Violins!?!??@?@?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by ♫♪♫, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. ♫♪♫

    ♫♪♫ Member

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    http://www.rondomusic.com/violins.html

    wow...and cheap prices too.

    My little bro (10) is taking violin, but rents it through the studio he goes to. He wants his own violin, and I was wondering if these would be any good. I don't want to shell out a lot of cash, and since the Agile electric guitars at rondo have gotten rave reviews, the violins have me VERY interested...
     
  2. re-animator

    re-animator Senior Member

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    looks pretty cool. I'm a little interested in picking up a violin (i know, you're supposed to start before you turn 8 or something, but i don't care), and I'll think about picking up a rondo.
     
  3. ♫♪♫

    ♫♪♫ Member

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    I asked for advice from a local violin teacher, so hope she gets back to me soon lol. I will let you know that I find out. Might want to post it at some violin forum too...
     
  4. Dr Git

    Dr Git Member

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    I bought one of Rondo's cheap bass' and its fantastic for recording
     
  5. webs

    webs Supporting Member

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    Violins are touchy- much more so than guitars, especially electric guitars. I'd be very careful ordering one that cheap. Playability is your #1 concern when starting out with the violin, and unfortunately that's hard to find in an instrument that cheap. Renting for a while longer is probably a good idea, especially since at 10 he's not likely using a full size yet.
     
  6. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    I would suggest keeping the rental....

    When you are ready to invest in a violin, invest in something worth restringing. Those are essentially going to be a Musical Instrument Shaped Product. Sometimes those can be made useable for a student after new or refitting pegs, cutting nut, setting soundpost, fitting bridge, new strings - maybe one to two hundred dollars work - at which point they may sound like something that could resemble a violin.

    Even for beginner grade, I think I'd have a hard time finding a bow in that price range. When he's ready to commit, it will be worth investing in something a bit more of an instrument. When you get to that point, you should ask an instructor or someone else more experienced for advice on choosing an instrument for him. Until then, you'll be better off with a rental.
     
  7. royd

    royd Member

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    I recommend Loxahatchee violins http://www.lvstrings.com/ George sells the best bang for the buck violins that you can get. My son had two of them and they were great violins for the money.
     
  8. royd

    royd Member

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    I should say violin shops are generally like walking into the past. They often don't have prices and even when they do, the prices seem fairly arbitrary.

    Often, you walk in and the owner asks, "What do you want to spend?" you answer and they begin pulling violins off the wall. I found myself wondering if I had quoted twice as much or half as much if the same violins would have been handed to me. Then, many dealers will say, "take that one home and play it for a week and let me know what you decide."

    Finally, know that violins cost considerably more at any given level than guitars. You can find an amazing guitar for $2K to $4K. If you want a professional level violin, you can expect to pay 4-10 times that or much more.
     
  9. ♫♪♫

    ♫♪♫ Member

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    the violin cant suck that bad though?

    look at the specs man! solid wood, etc.
     
  10. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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  11. ♫♪♫

    ♫♪♫ Member

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    yeah I see your point...might want to reconsider I guess...
     
  12. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    They do such a good job of making them look good on the surface, don't they? :rolleyes:

    It really is all the details that add up. Shape and fit of the pegs that create tuning problems, a poorly fit and cut bridge that affects bowing, poor neck and fingerboard quality leaving it prone to warp (if it even comes straight from the factory), poorly cut nut, poorly seasoned wood or made in poorly controlled conditions, lack of point blocks or linings leaving it prone to warping and easier separation.

    So new pins shaped and fit, a new bridge fit and cut, leveling and re-staining the board, new nut, set a new soundpost, then toss in a set of D'addario Helicore strings (at $30, those are cheap for violin strings) to replace the junk ones they come with, and a beginner's bow (another $30 for absolute rock bottom usable bow), and you're easily looking at $200-$250+. Then you would have a usable instrument, which would still probably sound pretty lousy, with questionable stability.

    These things sell like hot cakes, because people never expect all these little details.

    If you shop around (hopefully with assistance and advice from a teacher) you may find an acceptable, beginner instrument for under $200. For the $300-$400 range you can find a decent student instrument that can actually sound acceptable. Above that, and prices start climbing pretty quick (violin bows from a maker in the studio above my shop start at around $3000-$4000).

    Shar here in Ann Arbor is pretty good about being selective with the lines they carry, and they handle setup like tuning pegs and bridge fitting in their own shop to hold a decent playable standard, even on the cheapies. Best thing to do though is to consult your brother's violin teacher if he's taking private lessons, or get advice from the instructor if he's learning in school.
     
  13. ♫♪♫

    ♫♪♫ Member

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    I will do that, thanks very much for your help! :)
     
  14. rhp52

    rhp52 Supporting Member

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    You won't be doing yourself any favors, believe me. Violins can be nightmares for all the above resons and more. When i was in the wholesale music distribution biz we'd get these cheap violins from various sources. Garbage would be a complement.
     

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