Room treatments for a live room

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by IceTre, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. IceTre

    IceTre Supporting Member

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    I know you can put sound absorbing panels on the walls and ceiling to turn a live room into a dead room. But what if I want to turn a dead room-- say one with carpet on the floor-- into a live room, or rather semi-live room-- that would have a little bit of nice natural room reverb? Can that be done without ripping out the carpet? The walls are drywall but the room sounds dull to me, which I'm blaming on the carpet.
     
  2. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    Carpet is a non-linear absorber-it absorbs a narrow band of frequencies and can make the room sound weird and too dead. Best to take it out if you have nothing on the walls and the room is too dead. But if you tear it out and the room is too live, then you need good absorption and diffusion on the walls and ceiling. At least that's the way it's done in recording studios. You rarely see carpet on the floors-usually hardwood floor and maybe a rug here and there. Treatment (absorption and diffusion) is on walls and ceilings. You need to break up flat bare walls to avoid sproing (new word) and flutter echo.

    You could try just laying some sheets of plywood or other reflective material over the carpet if you don't want to tear it up. Depends on how you want it to look. Variable acoustics is nice to have in a room - you can change the character of the room by varying the amount of absorption, diffusion and reflection by moving things around on the walls. Panels that hang on rails around the room.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  3. rickenbackerkid

    rickenbackerkid Member

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    Sheets of ply can help lots. I've put sheets of ply under drums and guitar amps before to give some life.
     
  4. IceTre

    IceTre Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the tips, guys. If I rip out the carpet, what's the best thing to replace it with? This is the basement, so underneath is cement. What about padded tiles-- that would be most comfortable for the feet when I'm standing for long periods. Hard tile on a cement floor=sore feet and sore lower back. But would padded tile absorb sound just like carpet?
     

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