Running 9v pedals at 12v

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by playon, Feb 28, 2008.

  1. playon

    playon Supporting Member

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    Anyone like to do this? Also, is it safe to run older overdrive pedals at 12 volts? I ordered a 12 volt 1-spot power supply to experiment but I don't want to fry anything... I have heard that with most pedals this is OK, especially ODs and distortions, (perhaps not analog delays), true?
     
  2. jaywalker

    jaywalker Member

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    I run my old boss BF1 at 12 and it sounds 100 times better.
     
  3. zeta55

    zeta55 Member

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    Watch out for the caps in some of them pedals, the electrolytics are sometimes only good for 10V.
    They might blow.

    /Krister
     
  4. Stratso

    Stratso Member

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    Most people who are using an unregulated wall wart to drive low-current pedals are often running at 12V or even more. The reason is because unregulated adaptors have a voltage rating that basically tells you the voltage when drawing near or at max current.

    So if you're running an unregulated 9V, 200mA wall wart into a pedal that draws 10mA and you measure the loaded down voltage, you will probably see something around 10 to 13 volts or even higher.
     
  5. DejavuDave

    DejavuDave Member

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    Contact the maker of any pedal before doing this --- many pedals can't handle it and will fry. It's easy enough since most can be contacted via email these days. I did this for all my pedals and I know what they can and can't handle. Also, even if a pedal can take more juice it doesn't necessarily benefit. Some may produce more headroom, for example, while you won't hear a difference in others. After much experimenting I'm not running extra juice any of my pedals.

    Let me repeat myself: NEVER SEND MORE JUICE TO A PEDAL THAN SPECIFIED BY THE MANUFACTURER WITHOUT CONTACTING THEM FIRST!

    Good luck.
     
  6. TweedBassman

    TweedBassman Member

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    i agree with this, and to add:

    sometimes 16 volt caps, especially electrolytic, cannot handle 12 volts. in theory yes, but electrolytics can be cheap, drift from spec, etc, and many unregulated power supplies as mentioned above can go higher than rated.... a 12 volt supply that peaks above 14 volts, a 16 volt cap that drifts below 15... you do the math! :crazyguy
     
  7. Stratso

    Stratso Member

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    Good advice, but I don't think anyone needs to worry about three or four extra volts. Any manufacturer who makes a 9 volt pedal that blows up from 12 volts has failed miserably!
     
  8. Stratso

    Stratso Member

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    The only capacitors in a circuit that need a voltage rating higher than the operating voltage are the ones that filter the power supply. That's only 1 or 2 caps in most pedals. And those caps, from what I've seen, are usually rated at 25V or 35V or even 50V.

    A cap in an audio circuit that never sees more than, say a volt, doesn't need to be rated anywhere near the actual voltage of the pedal.
     
  9. DonaldDemon

    DonaldDemon Member

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    Do you think a TU-2 can handle 12V from the PP2+? The only reason I ask is because I want to try it at the end of my chain where my PH-1r (12V) is and don't want to dissemble my board to get to the dip switch under the PP2+.
     
  10. TweedBassman

    TweedBassman Member

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    you'd be surprised at how many people use 16v caps on the power filter, for space and cost savings. other than that, you're right on.

    i'd check out the voltage rating on the large caps right near the power input, if anyone here is worried about their pedals running at 12 volts.
     
  11. this1smyne

    this1smyne Member

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    but once again... be careful... i accidently fried my chorus pedal a couple years back... not all pedals can handle too much extra voltage, most were designed for the 9v battery.... and where the 9v supply can drift to 12/13 the 12v supply might drift to 16/17, which is beyond what those little boss pedals were meant to handle. the tuner MIGHT be ok, bc it prob has some sort of transformer or soak in it as it can be used to power other pedals so is probably designed to compensate for higher current flow. check the manufacturer... don't risk frying a $100-200 pedal like i did....
     
  12. DonaldDemon

    DonaldDemon Member

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    Yeah I would hate to fry my tuner just to experiment. I also figure that the PP2+ is rgulated and probably doesn't fluctuate in voltage like a wall wart would though.
     
  13. analogmike

    analogmike Gold Supporting Member

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    Don't run digital pedals at higher voltages. They usually use voltage regulators inside to get down to 5V for some of the digital chips. These regulators may get too hot if they need to work that hard regulating.

    Good luck!
     
  14. DonaldDemon

    DonaldDemon Member

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    Well, if you say so then i won't do it. I trust your opinion Mike. Thanks!
     
  15. playon

    playon Supporting Member

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    Yeah I wasn't talking about digital pedals, mostly talking about OD pedals such as older Ibanez, etc. I think that stuff will be fine with 12v. I also have several newer pedals where the mfg specifically says that up to 14-15v is fine. It depends on the overdrive, on some of them the extra headroom is really nice, on others, you maybe want a battery...

    Also I checked the output of my 1-spot with a meter, and it's dead on the correct voltage without a load.
     

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