Samick Interceptor 4 - any good?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by koda95, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. koda95

    koda95 Member

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    Jan 18, 2012
    Hello everyone,

    I am about to buy a guitar - and have been searching around many places. I would need a guitar to suit different styles ... from pop, country, rock and 80's heavy rock. I'm not looking for an expensive one...

    I came over a guitar in this sales-ad: http://www.finn.no/finn/torget/tils...ference=2012/1/10/8/326/376/78_-973157306.jpg

    Does anyone know anything about this kind of guitar... a Greg Bennett Design from Samick, called Interceptor IC-4??
     
  2. koda95

    koda95 Member

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    As far as I know ... Samick produces guitars for Fender and Gibson also; at least they used to do so...

    But I have never tried any of Samick's guitars before - and therefore I'm very uncertain about their quality. The info about the guitar said it's equipped with Duncan designed humbuckers, 5-way switch and Floyd Rose tremolo.
     
  3. Jef Bardsley

    Jef Bardsley Member

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    Middle Massachusetts
    Samick makes very good low-end guitars. In the mid-range, there are other choices, and the G&L Tributes, PRS SE series, ESP/LTDs and Peavey HPs (among others) seem more popular. My major complaint with Samicks is the nut is too high so you should have a luthier recut the slots. Perhaps a hold-over from 30 years ago when they didn't trust their own fretwork, but these days there's nothing wrong with Samick necks (I play one almost every day).

    If this is going to be your first guitar, I'd recommend against a Floyd Rose (especially a licensed one, although the LTDs are pretty good). Adjusting them is not an easy task, and if you change strings to a set that doesn't put exactly the same tension on the bridge, you'll be making adjustments. Until you get the hang of it, this could take several hours because tuning a string changes the height of the bridge, and changing the height of the bridge changes the tuning. 'Round and 'round you go.... Floating trems make tuning more of a chore as well. If you don't play, you might not realise strings stretch, and tweaking one string or another several time an hour is not uncommon, especially with a fresh set. Better to get a fixed bridge and spend all that time practicing. ;)
     
  4. koda95

    koda95 Member

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    Jan 18, 2012
    Thank you :aok .... those were really good advices! I really appreciate your information :).
    I've never had a Floyd Rose guitar before, and had just heard briefly other's say they were hard to maintain ... you now confirmed my suspicions (and "scared" me away from Floyd Rose's :) ).
     

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