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Santana: Who played what on Song Of The Wind?

Kenny Blue

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,656
Song of the Wind has always been one of my very favorite solos. The flow of it just has a perfection to it for me. I had also seen a video interview with Neal where he said that Carlos played the first part of that solo and then he played the second part. He said they played through the same rig. So it seems that this particular interview kind of contradicts what he said in the written interview, as to when in the solo he played. But then it was a number of years ago. And also it's quite possible, if they are indeed both on the final recording, that the final solo on the album was a mix of both of them, with cut ins done during the mix.

I have listened to it time and again trying to hear two people playing it. I find it interesting to read other's (here) pointing out time points where they believe that there are changes. I will have to listen to it again watching for those points myself as well.

I found one point where I felt maybe there was a switch, Carlos to Neal ... But I have to say if the two of them are really both playing on that solo it's an amazing job of continuity and flow shared by them. That solo seems like a very inspired, coherent statement in a particular style of expression. It so sounds like just one player to me.
 

Hari Seldon

Member
Messages
2,457
Ok - if Neil told different versions the question is open again.
I DON'T HEAR DIFFERENT PLAYERS AT ALL. ;-)

What about asking Carlos Santana? Does anybody here have his number?

edit: I just sent a mail to Santana management.
 
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BenP

Member
Messages
52
Slightly off topic,but has anyone heard any more about the Santana/Schon reunion project that was supposed to happen?
 
Messages
6,371
If you look at photos of Neil at the time he's playing a white rosewood board strat and Carlos is playing that old Les Paul of his. So there's a definite tonal signature of a humbucker at spots and other tonal signatures of a single coil with a more cutting tone. It sure does sound like the same exact rig and both guys are tuned into the same mental space however the "cutover" was done. It's still a wonderful piece IMO.
 

mookie green

Member
Messages
1
Great thread, and one of my favorite solos. I hear the switch from Neal to Carlos at 1:44 and back to Neal at 4:16. Carlos' pick attack is much more aggressive, sounds like he's playing with a coin.
 

jeff_lebowski

Member
Messages
1,349
Does anyone know if on Santana III Carlos and Neal are panned to different sides. I always thought that maybe Neal was left speaker and Carlos was on the right?

I always kind of dismissed those albums with Neal when I was younger because of how much I disliked journey. What a fool I was.
 

Leonc

Wild Gear Herder
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,436
Does anyone know if on Santana III Carlos and Neal are panned to different sides. I always thought that maybe Neal was left speaker and Carlos was on the right?

I always kind of dismissed those albums with Neal when I was younger because of how much I disliked journey. What a fool I was.

In my view, that was Santana's best record....largely because of Schon and the song-writing. I loved Batuka / No One To Depend On, Everybody's Everything (featuring one of Neal's best solos ever, IMO!), Guajira, Jungle Strut, Toussaint L'Overture, etc. etc. Killer guitar playing and tones. As to one being mixed to one side or the other...yes, more or less...but it varies from song to song who's on which side. But to me--it's easy to tell their playing apart. They're different enough stylistically.

Listen to Batuka, for example. It starts out with Neal's rhythm part on the left and Carlos' on the right...solos (all Carlos, I think) in the center.

Gujira - Carlos' solo around 3:26 is mostly left. Neal's around 4:06 is more on the right.

Jungle Strut - Carlos' rhythm is more to the right and his solos are more on the right, then the left. Neal's melody and rhythm part is more on the right. Neal's solo (2:49, 3:28) is more over to the right.

Everybody's Everything - only Neal solos and it's mostly on the left.
 

jeff_lebowski

Member
Messages
1,349
In my view, that was Santana's best record....largely because of Schon and the song-writing. I loved Batuka / No One To Depend On, Everybody's Everything (featuring one of Neal's best solos ever, IMO!), Guajira, Jungle Strut, Toussaint L'Overture, etc. etc. Killer guitar playing and tones. As to one being mixed to one side or the other...yes, more or less...but it varies from song to song who's on which side. But to me--it's easy to tell their playing apart. They're different enough stylistically.

Listen to Batuka, for example. It starts out with Neal's rhythm part on the left and Carlos' on the right...solos (all Carlos, I think) in the center.

Gujira - Carlos' solo around 3:26 is mostly left. Neal's around 4:06 is more on the right.

Jungle Strut - Carlos' rhythm is more to the right and his solos are more on the right, then the left. Neal's melody and rhythm part is more on the right. Neal's solo (2:49, 3:28) is more over to the right.

Everybody's Everything - only Neal solos and it's mostly on the left.

Thanks for the synopsis! Ill have to listen to the album soon with this information in mind. It really has quickly become one of my favorite go to albums.

It would probably help me if I dove more deeply into schon's post Santana work in terms of picking up more of his style. It kinda sounds like Neal has a fuzzier tone. It was this album that made me realize I need to focus on my listening skills a bit more haha
 

Lucidology

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
27,509
The difference is obvious to me ...
NS's playing isn't quite as grounded on this as is Santana's ...
(Though I could be wrong ...)
 

Hamer95USA

Member
Messages
3,051
I'd love to know which solos that Neal Schon plays on all of the Santana album with Neal or Carlos saying which solos they took. It would answer a lot of the questions that listeners & musicians who admire Santana's music would like to know.
Guitar George
 

jeff_lebowski

Member
Messages
1,349
Actually...I'd describe Neal's tone (on Santana III) as clearler and Carlos' as fuzzier...

Hmmmm ill have to listen again

that last solo on gaujira at 406 sounds a lot fuzzier and compressed than Carlos's right before it. Especially those searing opening notes.
 
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6,371
They also did a live reprise of this tune with Neal and Carlos on the "Viva Santana" live record which was more mellow than the takes we hear here. Thanks "Man_on_the_Silva_Mountain" for sharing the link for the third version I know of.
 

JB Eckl

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,171
OK lads, original Santana drummer Mike Shrieve told me it’s definitely not just Carlos, Schon is there too. I agree that you can hear a clear transition at 1:44, you start hearing some obvious Carlosisms right there. The transition back to Schon definitely happens, but it’s hard to say exactly when.

All these years I would have sworn up and down that it’s just Carlos, but now that first transition is painfully obvious. Wow!
 

john weires

Member
Messages
695
Schon was still very young when he joined Santana and searching for his own musical personality. It would not be surprising if he absorbed a lot of Santana's personal guitar style into his own playing. He could probably mimic Santana real well if he wanted to. If he did play on Song of the Wind this would explain why it can be hard to hear the back and forth hand offs.
 




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