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Scale Sequencing Patterns

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Redhouse-Blues, May 18, 2011.

  1. Redhouse-Blues

    Redhouse-Blues Member

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    As I'm working on my Alt picking and Scales, I'm starting to get into Scale Sequencing. Anybody have or can recommend any resources for different sequences? Like Diatonic 3rds, Ascending 4th's and so on. Anything great for Rock Lead playing.

    Or some of the ones you practice, that works into your lead playing.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  2. Cap'n Fingers

    Cap'n Fingers Member

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    Sequences are just interval patterns right?
     
  3. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean. Way back when I was learning scales I would use different patterns just because they sounded good and seemed like the thing to do. The ones that I gravitated towards and seemed to find their way into my playing were 3rds and 6ths. 4ths on minor scale things. Also other patterns like 1-2-3-4-2-3-4-5-3-4-5-6-etc, 1-5-4-3-2-6-5-4-3-7-6-5-4-etc. I just liked the sound and found out what I was doing later.

    If you haven't done much with arpeggios I would definitely work on that.
     
  4. Redhouse-Blues

    Redhouse-Blues Member

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    That's what I'm talking about, I'm going back to some basics to better sync my hands and better my technique. I have been working on it a lot over the last few months and it's also fixing my sloppiness, helping me play faster.
    I have heard a few people talk sequences for also working on the same things. I noticed some of the Rock guys I like, use sequences to go up and down the scale during solo's.
     
  5. Redhouse-Blues

    Redhouse-Blues Member

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    I wanna say yes, but I'm not 100% sure.
     
  6. chronowarp

    chronowarp Member

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    A sequence is just a repeating figure that moves but retains the note relationships (either the real relationships or the relative scale relationships) and possibly rhythms. You can have real sequences which are just chromatic transpositions of modules, or diatonic sequence that are the same modules transposed within the scale.

    So, like C D E, D E F, E F G is just a sequence in C major that ascends in groups of 3. A real sequence might be something like C D E, C# D# E#, D E F#, where the same line is getting transposed in its entirety. The OP is talking about sequences within a diatonic scale, as far as I can tell.

    I usually only ever get around to ascending in groups of 3, 4, and playing the scale in thirds/4ths.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  7. Cap'n Fingers

    Cap'n Fingers Member

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    Sounds like it can be any kind of pattern in the scale.

    interval wise I like 3rds, 4ths & 6ths
    adjacent notes I always do the old 1234-2345-3456, etc ascending and usually do it in reverse descending. There are literally tons of these types of patterns.

    My fav in a descending is more a visual pattern than a note pattern and mixes a min and a maj pent together b3154-b75b31-4265-1632-5316 (the 2nd note of each set is a pull off from the 1st note)
     
  8. StanG

    StanG Member

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    I have been working on patterns like this out of a jerry cover (I think) book, & find it very worthwhile. Going through all 12 keys really helps internalize chord tones and intervals. If you listen for them you hear these sequences all over the place in solos.
     
  9. Bryan T

    Bryan T guitar owner Silver Supporting Member

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    1235
    135, 246, . . .
    1357, 2461, 3572, . . .

    And do any sequence backwards or in any other permutation.

    Also, practice in position and shifting positions.
     
  10. FatJeff

    FatJeff Member

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  11. SmokeyJacks

    SmokeyJacks Member

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    try going up and down the scales in triads.

    ex: 1-3-5 2-4-6 3-5-7 4-6-1 5-7-2 6-1-3 7-2-4 1-3-5
    and then up and down in triads like this:
    1-3-5 6-4-2 3-5-7 1-6-4 5-7-2 3-1-6 and so on....
     
  12. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Check out this short article: http://www.grahamviolin.com/Scales.htm

    Random comments on the article:

    - It's short because you're expected to do a lot of the work, as far as deciding what fingerings to use, deciding if you want to work one position on the neck or move around the neck, the notes to play if you are less familiar with the scale, etc.

    - Note the two different ways intervals are practiced.

    - Note that the method takes you through the modes of the scale

    - Triads and tetrads are included

    - What you call a sequence, he probably calls a "melodic unit". You will be expected to write your own melodic unit exercises
     
  13. Japhyfish

    Japhyfish Member

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    BREAK AWAY FROM STRICT POSITION PLAYING: I'd suggest practicing scales up & down the neck on only one string or two & three string groupings. Creating melodies on one string & two strings will keep you from only playing scales runs when improvising. On one string you will also visualize the half step/whole step groupings that make up the scales.

    Or you can practice scales using only two notes per string which will have you ascending the scale starting on lower string/higher fret to higher string/lower fret and descending the scale from higher string/lower fret to lower string/higher fret.

    Another useful exercise is to learn the triads of each scale and run them in position and thru the two string grouping (ex. C major scale = Cmaj, Dmin, Emin, Fmaj, Gmaj, Amin, Bdim). Running thru all the triads of a scale on a two string grouping can sound very cool, getting you to another point on the neck for some of your other standard lick vocab.. When you get into triads of melodic minor/altered scales this kind of thing creates some interesting colors.

    Also you can take a scale in position and run thru the chord with parts of the scale as passing tones. play the rt-2-3-5-7 (up) & 7-5-2-3-rt(down), then rt-3-4-5-7 (up) & 7-4-5-3-rt (down), etc. this will help you see the chords w/in the scale and use the scale as passing tones.

    These things will help you break out of grips & positions and lead you to seeing the neck as one big pallet of tonal color... Practicing this stuff with a metronome will definitely help your picking.

    I've picked this stuff up from a couple great teachers and the Mick Goodrick book really susses out all the possibilities on this way of thinking as well.
     
  14. FannedFretFan

    FannedFretFan Member

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    Here is a very nice reference I recommend to my students.
     
  15. dsw67

    dsw67 Supporting Member

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    Lots of stuff on the web. Like this.
     
  16. Redhouse-Blues

    Redhouse-Blues Member

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    Thank you for all the replies!!! This is the kinda stuff I was looking for, I guess Melodic Patterns and Sequencing is the same thing. For a lot of the P&W stuff I do, I need to be more melodic. I understand and agree with not being locked in "STRICT POSITION PLAYING" the goal is to be able to play all over the neck. I'm practicing connecting the positions all over the neck, going up one and coming down another. But, many times in Blues and Rock, your not moving very far out of one position, like the G caged pattern.
     
  17. FatJeff

    FatJeff Member

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    Good stuff guys, thanks for the links
     
  18. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    David Baker has some great pattern books. The Oliver Nelson (if you don't own Blues and the Abstract Truth you are really missing something) pattern book is excellent.
    If you are trying to come up with cool stuff to play rock you're best bet is to copy the great players. Who do you love? Really, the same is true with jazz, bluegrass, any style in the aural tradition.
     
  19. Vishnu

    Vishnu Member

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    a question about this stuff.......i have been trying the scale sequences of late and finding them rather hard,in concentration and execution,yet i can blaze away good style with my own ****.....

    will they become easier for me if i stick at it?will new ones be less of a problem to me?
     
  20. Trevordog

    Trevordog Member

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    Yeah, just play them slow with a metronome, and then gradually raise the tempos.
    Paul Gilbert has tons of that type of stuff.
     

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