School Me on Pedal Painting

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by niclake13, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. niclake13

    niclake13 Member

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    For those of you that have painted pedals out there... got any tips? Sanding necessary? What kinds of paint should I use? Clear coats after the fact?
     
  2. midwayfair

    midwayfair Member

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    Best way to do it is powder coating. If powder coating isn't an option, consider buying them already powder coated. If you absolutely must do it yourself without powdercoating, then any type of Rustoleum that says it will work on aluminum will work.

    You can do clever art with acrylic or oil paints at this point. Once you do something clever on top of the powder coat (or rustoleum), you'll need enough clear coats to make you feel secure that your design won't rub off, but not so many clear coats that a chip in the paint will take the whole finish with it.

    Beavis Audio has a very awesome method for baking pedals in a toaster over (NOT ONE YOU USE WITH FOOD!!!!!!!) to finish the pedal in a day or less.

    Personally, I prefer to use decals or decoupage.

    Aluminum boxes tend to be rough. If you've got a polished steel box, then you paid too much money for something you are going to paint over!
     
  3. ledfloyd

    ledfloyd Member

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    There could be something here you might like
     
  4. dwolfggc

    dwolfggc Member

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    Could you explain a little the process of using decoupage on an aluminum case? the glue used and how (or if) you clear coat, etc.?
     
  5. midwayfair

    midwayfair Member

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    For all your gluing needs:
    http://www.thistothat.com/

    Although I find that any number of spray adhesives will hold the paper as long as you are (a) airtight and (b) putting clear paint on top.

    Decoupage sealant is a clear coat, but obviously clear spray paint is going to be a little more reliable (and waterproof).

    edit: Obviously, the simplest route is to use decals/printed labels, but I don't have a color printer or the paper necessary, and I kind of like the slightly junky collage look in art.
     
  6. markmantle

    markmantle Member

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    i have had so many ups and downs painting pedals. It seems that they are so sensitive to the slightest factors... I have had perfectly painted pedals, and thought i waited long enough... only to spray the clear coat on and turn the finish to snake skin... I have had beautifully painted pedals drop on to the ground... i have found hairs in the finish... NOW, im through with it.. I take them to be powder coated.

    I suggest you find a place that will put it in when they are doing someone else's bigger job, you may have to wait.. but I usually get it done for about 10 bucks...

    Then, you can add decals etc and not worry.
     
  7. gpro34

    gpro34 Member

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  8. piloto117

    piloto117 Member

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    Some few tips:

    When spraying paint, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS....use THIN coats!!! Can't stress this enough, since it's a very common mistake and we always get a little bit anxious to see our work finshed ASAP!
    Try to get a little bit more on the edges and corners, these areas are always prone to chipping off the paint.
    If you want super smooth surface use wetsand paper, get a heavy/medium, medium, fine and ultrafine grit.
    If you're using wet slide decals, I would strongly suggest to clearcoat, again...THIN coats!
    Make sure the paint is fully cured!!! If not, the mounted hardware (jacks, pots, etc.) will distort the paint. Best method? Time. Caution when using heat (it's never worked too good for me), if using an oven, it can bubble up the paint, and if you leave it in the sun, it can change the color. YMMV.
    I use Rustoleum and always spray a few coats of primer.
    Lastly, if you're using decals; one detail: printers don't have whites! Just in case you want a white font over a dark pedal.

    Good lUck!
     
  9. yerbluesrob

    yerbluesrob Supporting Member

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    I painted a few of my own, and then I started buying the enclosures already painted from pedal parts plus, way easier and looks so much better. It's a lot of work and takes a lot of time to paint them right. It's not very expensive to have them painted for you.
     
  10. niclake13

    niclake13 Member

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    Thanks for the input. I'm looking at painting a few of my BOSS and Ibanez units, as well as doing a custom job on a Pearl. Was just looking for the best methods and paints to use. :)
     
  11. niclake13

    niclake13 Member

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    Yeah, this whole painting pedals thing is far more work than I originally anticipated. Haha. Crap.
     
  12. piloto117

    piloto117 Member

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    Lol. Be patient, the end result is very rewarding!
     
  13. jnepo1

    jnepo1 Silver Supporting Member

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    I've painted a few pedals, and powder coating is a far superior product and end result. Powdercoaters are fairly cheap, and will even charge less depending on the color as well as if you are willing to wait on when they are doing that color in a batch. They don't paint multiple colors in a day, they do batch powder coating. So, if you are willing to wait, they will charge less to do your enclosure, sometimes they don't even charge.

    As for spray painting. Auto stores now carry Rustoleum brand auto paint and is a better quality than the everyday paints you find in a hardware store. Also, appliance paints are very durable, but limited in color options.
     
  14. chip46

    chip46 Member

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    If you wanted to do the powdercoating yourself. You can get powdercoating starter kits from places like Eastwood for $99-140'ish. You would also need a spare oven, toaster or otherwise. Never bake painted pedals in something you use to cook out of like your kitchen oven.
     

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