Science says Guitarists Brains are Different

Stu Blue

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http://www.policymic.com/articles/8...licymicFB&utm_medium=main&utm_campaign=social
(Excerpt)
By Jordan Taylor Sloan April 29, 2014

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Science Shows How Guitar Players' Brains Are Actually Different from Everybody Elses' Image Credit: AP Whether it's playing "Stairway to Heaven" until your fingers bleed or always finding yourself in the center of a group of people intent on singing "Wagon Wheel,"some things are common to all guitarists.
Including, as it turns out, their brain chemistry.
For starters, guitarists literally have the ability to synchronize their brains while playing. In a 2012 study in Berlin, researchers had 12 pairs of guitarists play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned. They discovered that the guitarists' neural networks would synchronize not only during the piece, but even slightly before playing. So, basically, guitarists can read each others' minds better than they can read music.
That synch happens in the areas of the brain that deal with music production and social cognition, so it makes a real difference in how tight a band sounds. When people talk about a band's chemistry, this may well be what they're seeing. It also explains why brothers are the core duo in so many famous rock bands.





For the real science
http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnhum.2012.00312/full

(Excerpt)
Conclusion

We investigated neural correlates of IAC by examining pairs of guitarists repeatedly playing a duet in two voices. Within-brain phase locking as well as within-brain and between-brain phase-coherence connection strengths were enhanced at frontal and central electrodes during periods that put particularly high demands on musical coordination. Phase locking was modulated in relation to the experimentally assigned musical roles of leader and follower. Hyperbrain networks during music performance showed small-world properties that were enhanced during musical coordination periods, and community structures encompassing electrodes from both brains (hyperbrain modules). Taken together, the present results considerably strengthen the claim made by Lindenberger et al. (2009), that synchronous oscillations within and between brains play a functional role in music performance, and support the more general conjecture that brain mechanisms indexed by phase locking, phase coherence, and structural properties of within-brain and hyperbrain networks support IAC.
 
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ReidS

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I can tell that from many of the comments I see on TGP :)
 
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Ferret

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Does science have anything to say about drummers' brains? Or scientists' brains for that matter?
 

Tom CT

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God that article is stupid...
Yup. The first thing that crossed my mind is that just maybe the guitarists were syncing (whatever that means) to the music as opposed to each other since, you know, they're playing the same piece at the same time.
 

Guitarworks

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Yeah I saw this article several days ago. I think all the writer is saying is that some people have a better inherent understanding of and connection with the guitar than others.
 
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Yeah I saw this article several days ago. I think all the writer is saying is that some people have a better inherent understanding of and connection with the guitar than others.
Actually, that's not what it says. It't about the player's connection to each other.

God that article is stupid...
Do you mean the actual journal article, or the reporting of said article?

Yup. The first thing that crossed my mind is that just maybe the guitarists were syncing (whatever that means) to the music as opposed to each other since, you know, they're playing the same piece at the same time.
I imagine the researchers considered that, but I don't know enough about neurochemistry to really understand the research article.


Then again, TGP'ers typically know more about everything than the people actually doing the research.
 






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