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Seam separation on Headstock: Repair?

valcoholic57

Member
Messages
534
Ok.

I have a 1968 National N 830 with an oddly shaped headstock.

Here's a picture of the guitar:

When I bought the guitar there was a perfectly straight vertical like running parallel to the tuners in the finish. I kind of figured this was a seam separation from the wings glued on the the side of the headstock. I've played for a few months and then noticed the crack had come apart a little more. You can barely get your fingernail in the crack. I immediately relieved the string tension and it has been sitting unused for about a month. This is my favorite guitar to play so its itching at me.

I've done some repairs myself but never this particular one. I was wondering how difficult you guys think it is. I assume you just get glue down into the seam and clamp it. How would you get glue down into the crack? I've read you can mix it with a little water and put it in with a needle but just seeing if anyone had any other tricks...

Obviously if it seems to be too difficult of repair I'll just take it to my tech. However, I do like to do my own repairs as it is just good experience. I'm very meticulous and feel like i Could do it fine as long as I know exactly how to go about it. I'll try to get a picture that shows the crack but its so small its not overly noticeable. Any advise is very much appreciated.
 

mike shaw

Member
Messages
2,213
Put the guitar on a table etc. with the crack facing up and the peghead level. Use some Elmers white glue and apply some to the top of the crack. Use a feeler guage to push the glue as far into the crack as you can. Flex the crack to work the glue around. Repeat this process a couple / few times until you're sure that the inside of the crack has been well coated with glue.
Make sure the glue doesn't dry on you. Clamp the peghead to fully close the crack (use cauls / pads) and clean up any squeeze out with a moist cloth. Let it dry overnight before moving clamp(s).

You can also use CYA glue with a whip applicator or syringe but you'll have to move pretty quick and be very careful of glue runout. CYA that dries on the finish can turn a small job into a PITA!
 

cap47

Member
Messages
2,272
I would use Titebond I and dilute 5% water. Don't use super glue. Work in as above.
 

mike shaw

Member
Messages
2,213
The only problem if using Titebond is that it will dry a kind of yellowish color. Elmers will dry clear. I guess it would depend on if the crack would be touched up with color.
 

NoahL

Member
Messages
1,423
+1 on the bit of added water. And/or warm the glue a little. Especially in the dry summer weather: you want it to work its way all the way in there, and wood glue can quickly get kinda gummy right about now.
 

valcoholic57

Member
Messages
534
Thanks for all the replys. I'm just worried about getting enough glue down into the crack. I can't even slide a business card down into it, however, I don't want to let it get any worse (as it used to just look like a crack in the finish so it is definitely slowly pulling apart). It seems likes tite bond, water, syringe, and clamps seems like the best route.
 




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