• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.
  • On Thursday, January 20, 2022, starting at 7 pm EST, We will take the forum offline to do the necessary upgrades. Estimates are a possible 3-hour total downtime to complete the process. So mark your calendar to play your guitar.

Sean Costello

Mr Meaner

Member
Messages
224
I know I'm a bit slow on the learning of this sad news, but I thought I'd share while I'm feeling what I'd felt if I had only known him before recently...
Sean Costello has become the next in line to one of the biggest tragedies in blues guitar heroes to me... I have just now found this sad, sad, story... Next to Stevie Ray(and thank the Lord he was able to find his way back before his untimely death) this may be even more sad. This guy was well on his way to being one of the next great players if you ask me!!! He even had a very positive interview just a few hours before his death... Sean was only one day before his 29th birthday and sounding so positive and so looking forward to what he accomplished in the past couple of years... Not that is all he had done, but it seemed to me those last couple were a beginning to the payoff of all his hard work... Like earlier, this is as close to the death of SRV that I've felt this way about... Maybe the SRV thing is a little more deserving of such grieving and thought as longevity goes... This is still very, very sad!

Go to his MySpace and listen to his first song on his player, "Going Home"... I know it's not actually HIS song, but it still will give you chills... Also, you should Google a Bob Dylan song he covered called "Simple Twist of Fate", just really great!!!
http://www.myspace.com/seancostello
While you're there scroll down and watch the amazing video as well...
This guy was an amazing talent and I'm pretty much devistated that I didn't get to catch him before he left...
Thanks so much Sean for sharing what you did in the little time you were here bro... THANKS SO MUCH!!!
 
Last edited:

JohnK24

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,825
I share your thoughts...his death hit me like Stevie Ray's ...I had only started to listen to Sean for about a year prior to his death. I turned several local blues fans and guitarists onto his music. We get together every now and then and still believe that "We Can Get Together" is the best blues album of this year...or the past several. Sean was a nature performer, singer and blues guitarist. Simply a total loss to the world of music. Heck, I bought my first P90 LP 'cause of him.
 
Messages
1,809
Sean is definitely one of the P-90 poster boys. Tone for days, and a great voice. He was the real McCoy, that's for sure. His handling of "Double Trouble" is one of the classic blues recordings for me.
 

Shnook

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,725
While Sean's death is tragic beyond words, I prefer to remember the music he made. He is one of my favorite singers and guitar players. Gone way too soon. RIP Sean
 

custom kid

Member
Messages
104
Its just incredibly sad on many levels..

A terrible loss of a young guy who had his whole life ahead of him.

At the same time it seems that he was either criminally underrated or just plain overlooked while he was with us. In a lot of those clips on youtube (including some just a few days before he passed) there only seem to be a handful of people in the place.

I only heard about him for the first time when he passed - but watching those clips it seems so obvious that this guy was the real deal, as a singer, musician and songwriter. A good looking guy too - he seemed to have it all, talent and marketability.

Watching the footage of him play in half empty clubs and bars reminds me of those stories you hear about guys discovering Hendrix in Greenwich village or SRV before he got famous. Its just glaringly obvious how great he is - and I expect it was even more undeniable if you were in the room when he played.

I know he worked with Susan Tedeschi a few years back but I just don't know why he wasn't better known. It would have been great to see one of the bigger names give him some exposure or a shot as their opening act.....he'd have fitted right in on one of the early slots at either of the Crossroads festivals.

Surely John Mayer must have known about Sean too...given that he was also involved in the Atlanta scene before he got a deal.

The only conclusion I can come up with is that the bigger more establised artists were either unaware of Sean or were perhaps worried about being eclipsed if they shared stage time with him.

Stephen T - I've read your other posts and know that you were friends with Sean. Would be great to get your views and insight on this. I'm just amazed and saddened that it seemed to take his death for many people (including myself) to hear about him.
 
Last edited:

stephenT

Member
Messages
2,471
Stephen T - I've read your other posts and know that you were friends with Sean. Would be great to get your views and insight on this. I'm just amazed and saddened that it seemed to take his death for many people (including myself) to hear about him.
I don't know why, even though I've been a musician all my life, I don't understand the music business,... timing obviously, maybe because his choice was to play blues and his audience was limited,... he came around in a time where the "Young Blues Phenomenon" was the rage, Sean was an old soul and really didn't fit that box.

We've all read stories about overnight successes that took 10 years of hard touring to break out. I do believe that Sean was just about there. His last release finally did him justice. Those of us who saw him perform live knew his recorded material didn't come close to illustrating the extent of his amazing talent.

When Sean passed we found that people all over the world knew of him and were touched by Sean's talent, his music and his spirit. At Sean's graveside my dear friend Ross Pead in his grief said to me, "We all knew Sean was THE ONE. The one who would not make the mistakes we all made,.. We loved him and we stood aside and we were proud to do so".

I do want to say that in many ways Sean was very successful. He played the music he loved, he saw the world doing it, he played with most of his heros and those who knew him, loved and respected him. He climbed the mountain. He was trying to work out having a life beside his career when he died.

My hope is, like you, folks will continue to discover Sean Costello as long as guitars are played.
 
Last edited:

Mr Meaner

Member
Messages
224
I don't know why, even though I've been a musician all my life, I don't understand the music business,... timing obviously, maybe because his choice was to play blues and his audience was limited,... he came around in a time where the "Young Blues Phenomenon" was the rage, Sean was an old soul and really didn't fit that box.

From what I understand and I'm not a friend or anything, but this is what I read into what very little I know... The first 4 albums he made were not really pushed by the label. Getting dumped by a label is like almost getting the death penalty unless you're well known already.

We've all read stories about overnight successes that took 10 years of hard touring to break out. I do believe that Sean was just about there. His last release finally did him justice. Those of us who saw him perform live knew his recorded material didn't come close to illustrating the extent of his amazing talent.

:agree


At Sean's graveside my dear friend Ross Pead in his grief said to me, "We all knew Sean was THE ONE. The one who would not make the mistakes we all made,.. We loved him and we stood aside and we were proud to do so".

Is this is reference to lifestyles or music?

I do want to say that in many ways Sean was very successful. He played the music he loved, he saw the world doing it, he played with most of his heros and those who knew him, loved and respected him. He climbed the mountain. He was trying to work out having a life beside his career when he died.

He played many places many only wish they could... They're so many people out there in this same situation. I'd say it comes back to who you know, but he has references of BB King as well as others. It's hard for people to understand when a musician is not playing there is a life other than music. When the music stops it's back to the Real Life... Can you say at the time of his death his life was in some kind of turmoil? Girlfriend, financial, family trouble... I know from his website has a memorial fund for Bipolar research and can only assume that he had such a problem. In this short time I've tried to figure out what can. It's always been said he was as gracious and giving a person you could find...

My hope is, like you, folks will continue to discover Sean Costello as long as guitars are played.
I'm certain my encounter even though it's after his death will be everlasting. Don't know exactly why? Not saying it will affect me the same way SRV's death did, but it's strange how it has so much for as little I know of him...

Do you know if his band members have moved on or what they're doing now? Really appreciate you posting as well as the great pic of his Gold Top!!! Thanks!
 

duanesworld

Member
Messages
984
I have met Paul, his drummer of recent, He is living and playing with some great players out here in las vegas. And he has been great to talk to about Sean and the music. Check him out on myspace.
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,269
His recordings never leave my CD player. He sounded so fresh, yet so famliar. Eeverything he did was near perfection for me---his timing, sound, singing, emotional content. Wow.

At 29, he was already a master. The only other musician death that has bothered me this badly was when John Bonham died.
 

custom kid

Member
Messages
104
I do want to say that in many ways Sean was very successful. He played the music he loved, he saw the world doing it, he played with most of his heros and those who knew him, loved and respected him. He climbed the mountain. He was trying to work out having a life beside his career when he died.

My hope is, like you, folks will continue to discover Sean Costello as long as guitars are played.
Thanks Stephen - its great to get some insight from someone who knew him.

I'm curious about a couple of things and wonder if you might know the answers.

I read an interview Sean gave to a local newspaper around the time 'We Can Get Together' was released....he mentioned that he was considering (or had considered, can't remember which)....putting a more commercial project together that would be separate from his more blues based material.

Was this the unreleased album featuring the Dylan cover - or something different entirely? I'm just wondering because the Dylan stuff and the more RnB stuff seemed to already be a pretty regular part of his set from what I can tell. I can't remember where I read the interview now but I think he may have mentioned that it was more rock based.

Was he interested in playing different styles of music?

The other question is do you know if any of his gigs were professionally filmed. The youtube clips are phenomenal but it would be great if one day something of better quality is released.

Lastly and most importantly - I'm truly sorry for your loss - it seems to have touched a lot of people who never knew him - but its obviously far worse for his family and friends.
 
Last edited:

Strat-O

Member
Messages
771
At the same time it seems that he was either criminally underrated or just plain overlooked while he was with us. In a lot of those clips on youtube (including some just a few days before he passed) there only seem to be a handful of people in the place.

I know he worked with Susan Tedeschi a few years back but I just don't know why he wasn't better known.

The only conclusion I can come up with is that the bigger more establised artists were either unaware of Sean or were perhaps worried about being eclipsed if they shared stage time with him.
Well, this is probably going to sound bitter and negative, but its how I feel. He didn't wear a black hat, play Jimi Hendrix covers, overplay or pander to mainstream media. Therefore, his vast talent flew under the radar to all but those of us who are drawn to artists of depth, passion, talent, creativity, and sincerity.

Anybody who was lucky enough to stumble across a Sean Costello performance never thought twice about what they were seeing and hearing. I'll see him again one day. When I do I'm going to shake his hand and say thank you!
 

stephenT

Member
Messages
2,471
I read an interview Sean gave to a local newspaper around the time 'We Can Get Together' was released....he mentioned that he was considering (or had considered, can't remember which)....putting a more commercial project together that would be separate from his more blues based material.

Was this the unreleased album featuring the Dylan cover - or something different entirely? I'm just wondering because the Dylan stuff and the more RnB stuff seemed to already be a pretty regular part of his set from what I can tell. I can't remember where I read the interview now but I think he may have mentioned that it was more rock based.

Was he interested in playing different styles of music?

The other question is do you know if any of his gigs were professionally filmed. The youtube clips are phenomenal but it would be great if one day something of better quality is released.

Lastly and most importantly - I'm truly sorry for your loss - it seems to have touched a lot of people who never knew him - but its obviously far worse for his family and friends.
Sean was a huge Dylan and Band fan. he'd spent time with Levon Helm and did some of Levon's Midnight Rambles a few years back. Levon was just starting to sing again,... Sean was dating Amy Helm, Levon's daughter. I remember that some of these were filmed but I don't have any info on that, check here.

http://www.levonhelm.com/midnight_ramble.htm

Sean was interested in doing a roots project. He was a fixture at our Sunday night gigs at the Northside Tavern when he was in town and dug what we were doing at the time. He wanted to product the Fat City Wildcats in the studio, but we were never a studio band and we never did anything but live recordings. He kidded he was going to steal our "act" and always said it was his favorite band. "Little Birds" on Sean's "We Can Get Together" release was a good example of a possible new direction.

The unreleased material was recorded in NY, there's some good stuff there and I imaging someone will release it but "We Can Get Together" is a superior effort IMHO, and in Sean's as well. He was proud of his work and felt it was some of his best recorded guitar work, and it is, no question about that.

Sean was a smart guy, he missed nothing, loved NPR, read veraciously, was tremendously funny and he was a great friend. I miss him every day.

 
Last edited:

MLG8675

Member
Messages
383
I had heard of Sean right after I moved to Atlanta and kept meaning to make it down to the Northside Tavern to hear him play.

Sadly, I like so many others, missed that opportunity.

Fortunately I did discover the Northside Tavern because of Sean's name alone, and finally made it down this past weekend...
Ike Stubblefield and company. Whoa!!! Can't wait to come back!
 

Mr Meaner

Member
Messages
224
Well, this is probably going to sound bitter and negative, but its how I feel. He didn't wear a black hat, play Jimi Hendrix covers, overplay or pander to mainstream media. Therefore, his vast talent flew under the radar to all but those of us who are drawn to artists of depth, passion, talent, creativity, and sincerity.

Why is it that when someone, anyone that plays blues and is young, usually is thrown into the SRV category? Sean played blues... SRV played blues... Sean has many of the same influences as SRV... That being said I find that Sean was a total different style of blues... SRV would tell you himself that he was very lucky the cards fell the way they did for him as far as his success... The music business has changed drastically since the 80's anyway... It's not just Sean, SRV is a big influence on many people Joe Bonamassa for example. He is another that is his own, yet he's become pretty popular. Just hate that they have to put down a great influence(SRV) because he was that... Great!!!
 

Strat-O

Member
Messages
771
:huh I hope you didn't think I was necessarily putting down Stevie Ray Vaughan. I wasn't. My point is that feather boa's and 'Voodoo Chile' (in addition to talent) get an artist into the limelight much faster than being 'just' a classy talented artist like Sean Costello was.

I would hope that no one would take anything I said personally. I'm just venting. Its a personal issue for me, and maybe this wasn't the best place to bring it up. Sorry.

Why the album 'Sean Costello' didn't win a Grammy is one of the great mysteries of the world to me. One of a long list of things that don't make sense to me in this world. The newest album is brilliant too.
 

Mr Meaner

Member
Messages
224
:huh I hope you didn't think I was necessarily putting down Stevie Ray Vaughan. I wasn't. My point is that feather boa's and 'Voodoo Chile' (in addition to talent) get an artist into the limelight much faster than being 'just' a classy talented artist like Sean Costello was.
SRV was an influence on Sean I can almost guarantee you... Sean played his share of cover tunes as well though. Have yet to hear any Hendrix, but from what I understand he liked the older blues vibe. To me it fit his persona much better!

I would hope that no one would take anything I said personally. I'm just venting. Its a personal issue for me, and maybe this wasn't the best place to bring it up. Sorry.
No bro nothin' personal. It's definitely not just you... Everyone seems to be upset about comparisons to the feathered phenom that used his influences just as most others on their albums.


Why the album 'Sean Costello' didn't win a Grammy is one of the great mysteries of the world to me. One of a long list of things that don't make sense to me in this world. The newest album is brilliant too.
:agree ... There should be many others as well though... Joe Bonamassa, but he's the same... Acknowledges SRV as an influence but hates to be compared. Just go with it... Most any musician knows they do their own thing amazingly different, but yet the same... Just can't help when they play and all those influences seem to cross and come out when they play.

Take care!!!
 

stephenT

Member
Messages
2,471
SRV was an influence on Sean I can almost guarantee you...
Well, not musically. In no particular order,..

Hubert Sumlin, Jody Williams, Otis Rush, Robert Lockwood Jr., Johnny Taylor, Bobby Womack, Al Green, Booker T. & the MGs, Eddie Hinton, Howlin Wolf, BB King, Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, Freddie King, Jimmy Rogers, Sam Cooke, Robert Ward, Guitar Slim, Magic Sam, J.B. Lenoir, Freddy King,...
 

jawjatek

Member
Messages
711
Sean wouldn't listen to stuff he considered derivative. I heard him refuse requests for SRV tunes at gigs many times. Once he told me they were going to be playing a private shindig somewhere up northeast, and were going to be on a bill with Savoy Brown. I mentioned that he might like Kim Simmonds, that he was one of my favorite Brit blues players, and tried to lend him my Street Corner Talking CD. He said he had never heard of Kim and I don't think he ever listened to the disc. He wasn't too interested in hearing others interpretations of the original artists, or so it seemed that way to me at the time - he was a seeker of musical truth.
 

custom kid

Member
Messages
104
Thanks again Stephen - really interesting to read your posts.

Its a shame if Sean's trio was never professionally filmed....I've heard some great sounding audio recordings from the last year or so - but a possible dvd in the future would have been even better!

I'm in the UK - but hope to visit the Northside Tavern one day. I've heard a lot about it while trying to learn more about Sean's work.

Hopefully I'll get a chance to see your band play then.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom