Seller who avoids talking about dead spot?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by zeuch, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. muku

    muku Supporting Member

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    after buying hundreds of guit fiddles. I have only once had a dead spot on a Warmouth partcaster.
    Not sure why you would ask about dead spots. I never have. I also rarely see sellers pitch no dead spots.
    Maybe you have had some weak lumber Squire affinities or something where you told yourself you will always ask about such a phenomenon?

    There are slight twists in necks out there. I have seen a lot of non parallel relief bows...meaning..
    Looking down the treble side and then the bass side of the neck on a steep angle from the top.
    Some guitar fretboards do not have the relief curve at the 5th or 7th fret matched perfectly on both sides.
     
  2. reddgeetarzan

    reddgeetarzan Supporting Member

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    Did you ask for neck measurements and weight, etc.? If you get TOO particular with questions it might scare off the seller. Sounds like that's what happened to me. I wouldn't take him as being 'rude' as much as him seeing the scenario play out in his head of you not being satisfied with the purchase and wanting a refund. That's no fun for anyone.
     
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  3. LeicaBossNJ

    LeicaBossNJ Silver Supporting Member

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    Just because some phenomena exists doesn't mean it's quantifiable [edit: pragmatically quantifiable]

    Please explain exactly what the practical threshold of "not that bad" and "bad" dead spots is, in objective terms, that a company would be able to use to side with either a buyer or a seller in a dispute.

    You can't, and that's the point.

    By engaging in that conversation, the seller is giving the buyer an almost automatic return policy - "item not as described"
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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  4. Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky Member

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    'Tis safer under the bridge.
    Sellers and buyers are just not good fit for each other sometimes. We should recognise that and just let it go. As a seller, I hate disappointing a buyer. If I sense any risk of disappointing him or her I would just call off the sale. The only ones to gain are the shipping companies, and Paypal-as it no longer refunds transaction fees-in the event of a return.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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  5. hippietim

    hippietim Member

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    That's it in a nutshell. A lot of buyers act like they're dealing with Guitar Center or Sam Ash when they're dealing with private sellers and small businesses.

    I would have given the same response as the seller you were dealing with. And it's not because I couldn't come up with the information you were looking for. I didn't need to get burned more than once to learn my lesson. Just like I will never, ever say anything is "like new" or "mint".
     
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  6. ChrisP

    ChrisP Member

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    I think the seller did the right thing.

    Also, am I clueless??? I have a Jazz and a P-bass and have not noticed any dead spots.
     
  7. hippietim

    hippietim Member

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    You're not clueless. You're fortunate! I've definitely had instruments over the years that had dead spots.
     
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  8. zeuch

    zeuch Supporting Member

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    Well, the brands I buy usually have neck shape and dimension measurements listed on their website, and they are very consistent. The weight varies a bit but I do due diligence online to get the ballpark. For example, I will directly tell the seller that I'm looking for a S-type guitar between 7 and 8 pounds. In case of a rare wood combination (rosewood/cocobolo neck or one piece maple body etc), I have no choice but to ask. Never had a problem before. I think in general asking for weight is more acceptable than asking about dead spots, but I don't want to stir the pot again.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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  9. DCross

    DCross Supporting Member

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    I think that many dead spots can go away by changing strings, performing a setup or maybe doing a little bit of fretwork. But some guitars are definitely more problematic. Some even require exorcisms.

    Anyway, this thread made me go fret by fret through my two electric guitars - Eastman T64 and a G&L ASAT Classic Thinline. I didn't find any dead spots, but it made me wonder if I would ever make a video of me slowly playing every fret of every string for a potential buyer. Maybe, for a $3,000 guitar that wasn't selling. But definitely not as a matter of routine. Of course, my touch and technique won't be the same as yours. So, maybe I wouldn't have a dead spot where someone else would, on the same guitar.

    Hey Zeuch - just curios, what is the guitar you're looking for?
     
  10. zeuch

    zeuch Supporting Member

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    Exactly, everyone's mileage may vary. If you own a strat or a tele then you are less likely to encounter this issue than the owners of SG. I would prefer not to disclose the specific model, so that I can avoid criticism. Again, it is a popular 24 fretter. No one else has complained about dead spot on it, but my experience with the local one made me cautious. I respect the company, like the model, and will keep shopping for another one that suits me better. Seriously, no one plays solo with long notes any more, right? Petrucci who? :bonk

    BTW, I just tried some single cut guitars made by Eastman at Soundpure, and they really blew my mind!
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  11. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    I bought a Les Paul that had a dead spot on the lower strings around 12th fret. I had a Luthier do a neck straightening and got new frets (removing the nibs) in the process. It was worth the expense.
     
  12. riker4208

    riker4208 Member

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    totally agree with the seller.
     
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  13. Rod

    Rod Tone is Paramount Supporting Member

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    For me as well.. very subjective... especially dealing with wooden guitars.. the only electric I ever owned that had perfectly balanced string volume throughout the fingerboard was a Koa Travis Bean carved top Artist.. unfortunately it weighed 14 lbs... but what a sound it had
     
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  14. romiso

    romiso Silver Supporting Member

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    I've been through dozens of guitars over the years and the only model that consistently had a dead-spot problem was the SG. In particular, fatter-necked Standards and Classics, on the 11th fret, on the G string. Small sample size I know (I've owned two of each in the past), but the thinner-necked SGs I've owned (two, both Custom Shop) haven't had this problem.

    I know I proved absolutely nothing.

    Oh, and I agree with the seller's point of view here (in case that was still a question)
     
  15. thepilgrimsdream

    thepilgrimsdream Member

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    It's when you play a bad note and blame the guitar :bonk
     
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  16. Boundcustom

    Boundcustom Member

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    You toss a red flag and I try to talk you out of the deal where I ship you something and you send it back.
     
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  17. Guitardave

    Guitardave Supporting Member

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    I actually like it when people specifically ask me about the things that are important to them. And before I finalize any big dollar transaction I insist we talk live on the phone as well.

    But after hundreds of deals over the years I am quite happy to walk away from any deals that seem like it could be a bad deal for either party. The seller did both of you a favor - you need to learn to accept it.

    This is why selling locally is such a good idea for many types of gear. And by the way - Paypal allows a six month return window over issues like this...plenty of time for every buyer to experience remorse and force a return at the seller's expense.
    I'm not a fan of anyone not being forthright in their dealing - on either side of a transaction. I, like many, just want to avoid drama.

    As for the Suhr - I say you both lucked out.

    Here's a good hypothetical ethics exercise for you:

    Let's assume that Suhr arrived and indeed had a bad dead spots on the 11th fret or in other places. Would you have simply accepted it or returned it? If you forced the return would you have reimbursed the seller for all their shipping expenses in the transaction?

    And for the advanced ethics question - assuming you didn't force the seller to take it back you still have a guitar that's unplayable for your needs. Assuming you sell it - how do you describe the dead spots?
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
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  18. DustBusterB

    DustBusterB Member

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    Yup...you nailed it.
     
  19. Lepinkäinen

    Lepinkäinen Member

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    There's a quick way to find out, if the dead note is in fact deadspot caused by the wood resonance, which maybe hard to fix instead of just poor setup or uneven fret:

    Press the headstock gently directly against a wall, if the note sustains then, it's a deadspot issue.

    That's because the neck resonance changes when the contact is made.
     
  20. hardbob

    hardbob Member

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    I was wondering too. The OP said a G was not sounding so I believe it is a G spot that no longer functions as it was designed.
     

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