Sensitivity of high $$$ models to outside gigging

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
Ive been a club- private gig player all my life. Starts, Les Pauls and Teles. Some outdoor gigs but decent weather settings. I’m looking at getting into an acoustic group that does outdoor jobs spring, summer and fall. I’d like to pick up a good acoustic but unsure how hard indiana humidity would be. I’m looking to spend $1,500-$2,000. Would I be better getting a less expensive laminate?
Thanks
 

mccreadyisgod

Member
Messages
420
Sounds like the ideal situation to look at a carbon fiber guitar. I personally own three Rainsong guitars, and they would be perfect for that sort of situation. And the newer Rainsong Concert Hybrid series is really well configured in that price range. So that's what I'd recommend, a Concert Hybrid-series Rainsong guitar.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
Thank you both for the replies. I do have a 1970 Gretsch ShoBro. Played a lot of slide on it years ago and stil record with it. But with the sentimental value, probably not taking it out. I have been curious about the Rainsong’s. I will look deepervat those.

Thanks for any other replies too.
 

Crazyquilt

Guitar Dad
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,494
You might check out the new Fender Acoustasonic Tele. Reports of the acoustic sounds have been consistently very good, although the electric seems to be rather a wash. A carbon fiber guitar with a nice SBT would also work well, I think. I've owned a couple of Composite Acoustics, and still have a Cargo. Nice stuff, and really removes a lot of the headache from performing with an acoustic.

On the other hand, while I'm a massive reso fan, they're so different in sound & feel from a flat top that I'm not sure you'd be happy. The wide nut and super thick neck and (usually) relatively heavy strings make for a very different playing experience as well. Also, tricones are a PITA to amplify, and all resos are feedback machines.
 

OM-18fan

Member
Messages
84
I think you are worrying way too much about this. You're not going to leave the guitar outside overnight, are you? I play outside all the time. During really humid weather, just keep the guitar in the case and if it's really bad, like raining every day for a month, put some de-humifying device, like slica packs in the case.

Wit wood acoustic guitars, there's more to worry about low humidity but that's a different issue.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
Thanks OM...
I wondered if I wasn't being too sensitive to this. You are right, it won't be out all night.
 

Bluzeboy

Platinum Supporting Member
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7,854
First .. what kind of “acoustic group”.
In some instances a reso would be completely out of place.
 

TheoDog

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,727
In most cases, you should be just fine with a regular acoustic. Remember, if you are uncomfortable, so is the guitar. So in a case that the outdoor gig is too hot, too cold, too rainy or whatever- you won’t have enough audience to warrant the gig.
If you are concerned with durability- Takamine is the workhorse brand of plugged in acoustics. As a compromise, the Taylor 200 series and similar Martins have solid tops with laminate back and sides. Easy to find under you budget used.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
First .. what kind of “acoustic group”.
In some instances a reso would be completely out of place.
I've played quite a few genres but on electric, mainly jazz, blues and fusion-based rock. Way back in the day, I played quite a bit of dobro. This new opportunity would be Merle, Waylon, CSNY, Prine, etc.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
In most cases, you should be just fine with a regular acoustic. Remember, if you are uncomfortable, so is the guitar. So in a case that the outdoor gig is too hot, too cold, too rainy or whatever- you won’t have enough audience to warrant the gig.
If you are concerned with durability- Takamine is the workhorse brand of plugged in acoustics. As a compromise, the Taylor 200 series and similar Martins have solid tops with laminate back and sides. Easy to find under you budget used.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
Good common sense. I quit doing outside gigs a long time back if temps were below 65 if no heating was available. Here in Indiana, it can get muggy as heck. You're right, I should apply the same standard to hot weather. I've been away from the acoustic world for so long. Thanks for pointing out Takamine too.
 

Bluzeboy

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
7,854
I've played quite a few genres but on electric, mainly jazz, blues and fusion-based rock. Way back in the day, I played quite a bit of dobro. This new opportunity would be Merle, Waylon, CSNY, Prine, etc.
In that case I would go with @TheoDog ..
good luck
 

veinbuster

Member
Messages
615
I wouldn’t have any concerns about playing an outside gig with my better acoustics. Even playing all afternoon isn’t going to bother the guitar. Just take it back home to a better controlled environment when you are done and it will be fine.

Going on a long camping trip on the gulf coast in the summer would be a different story.
 

Pinelake

Member
Messages
670
I can't imagine buying a laminated guitar just to spare my Gibson from a humid afternoon. These things aren't the fragile flowers we sometimes think they are. Leaving the good guitar at home to perform with a cheapie just seems wrong.
Good point too. We only go around here once.
 

MJ Slaughter

Member
Messages
1,930
I've played a number of outdoor gigs and find if I give the guitar time to acclimate to the environment before tuning it does alright. The problems occur when moving from shade to direct sunlight.
 

MikeVB

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,442
I’ve played outside gigs with Martins, vintage Gibsons, and Santa Cruz in temps from 30 to 100 degrees, 0-20 mph wind, and low humidity to 100%. Other than tuning issues which can be adjusted with those knobs on the headstock the guitars didn’t complain at all.
 




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