Sheets of Sound technical help needed...

BFC

Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
In section 3, the arpeggio section, there are a few arpeggios that require sweeping across three strings at the same fret and presumably with the same finger. I can't quite seem to get a handle on playing these cleanly even at slow tempos. I have a tendency to smear the notes together in this situation. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Brian
 

jzucker

Supporting Member
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20,734
Try rolling the "barred" finger in the direction of the picking. Don't just lay it down across the frets. You want it to simultaneously lay on the string you are about to pick and then come up as you move to the next string.
 

Joe

Senior Member
Messages
3,526
Sweep picking takes a LOT of work, its almost like learning to play lefty. There is nothing easy or natural about sweep picking, but once you can do it, you have access to playing most can never touch.
 

BFC

Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
I don't have any trouble rolling the barred finger across two adjacent strings but three or more is proving to be very difficult for me. I'm especially having trouble going down (2nd to 3rd to 4th string for example). I'll keep working at it.

Brian
 

jzucker

Supporting Member
Messages
20,734
Use your wrist to vary the angle of the finger on the strings as you roll forward or backwards. As far as sweeping up goes, make sure the flat plane of the pick is perpendicular to the guitar's face. If you hold your pick so that there is a less than 90 degree angle between the bottom edge and the plane of the top of the guitar, it will make sweeping down easier but sweeping up difficult. That's the main issue I've seen with folks who have problems sweeping up. (That and gravity) :D
 

TonyV

Member
Messages
619
Jack,

In Shawn Lanes Book/CD/Video he advocates using a different finger for the same fret on adjacent strings. I have also read this in Andrew Green's Jazz Technique book.

It certainly feels more "assertive", the notes sound more distinct and more conviction. It is not uncomfortable to do but as far as getting it up to speed, well that is another matter.

What are your thoughts?

Tony

Edited to add:
In Andrew Green's book he notes that the longer finger goes to the lower string. IMO an important point, it feels quite natural that way.
for example it you are going fron the F on the A string to the Bb on the D string you could use your middle finger on the F and index on the Bb. The rule stays the same going in either direction.
 

jzucker

Supporting Member
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20,734
Originally posted by TonyV
Jack,

In Shawn Lanes Book/CD/Video he advocates using a different finger for the same fret on adjacent strings. I have also read this in Andrew Green's Jazz Technique book.

It certainly feels more "assertive", the notes sound more distinct and more conviction. It is not uncomfortable to do but as far as getting it up to speed, well that is another matter.

What are your thoughts?.
If you can do that, it's great and I think you'll end up with a cleaner sound but it wasn't worth the effort for me. Matte Henderson also advocates doing that. On the other hand, Gambale uses the same finger.

I've heard good things about Andrew Green's book. How is that?
 

TonyV

Member
Messages
619
His technique book is interesting but his improv book is what I have spent more time with. His improv book (Jazz Guitar Structures) is about using 4 note cells as an improv tool and how the same cells can be superimposed over different chord types. The presentation is very well laid out, for each cell he gives fingerings then chord voicing then examples.

He has samples on his web site but I cannot find it again.
Edit to add:
Found Andrew Green's site
http://www.chopsfactory.com/
 

BFC

Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
I'm improving a bit on this. Just a matter of persistence I think.

Brian
 

johnc

Member
Messages
562
I find sweeping up to be the most difficult of the two.

I tend to use my right hand to mute the string that I've just played. So when you're sweeping up its hard for me to mute the string I've just played and then move my hand in an upward direction to play the next note on the next physically higher string.

I don't know if what I'm saying makes any sense, but right hand muting just seems more natural when sweeping in a downward motion rather that an upward motion.

Anybody else have this problem?

Maybe I should be doing more muting with my left hand?

I'm really trying to correct my sloppiness so that certain notes don't continue to ring out after I've moved on to the next note when playing an arpeggio.
 

3Sides

Member
Messages
336
Same problem here, in general I always have a problem muting when move up the strings. No one has ever been able to help me with that. Moving down and palm muting, no problem, movinig up and finger muting, total problem.
 

jzucker

Supporting Member
Messages
20,734
Originally posted by johnc
I find sweeping up to be the most difficult of the two.

I tend to use my right hand to mute the string that I've just played. So when you're sweeping up its hard for me to mute the string I've just played and then move my hand in an upward direction to play the next note on the next physically higher string.

I don't know if what I'm saying makes any sense, but right hand muting just seems more natural when sweeping in a downward motion rather that an upward motion.

Anybody else have this problem?

Maybe I should be doing more muting with my left hand?

I'm really trying to correct my sloppiness so that certain notes don't continue to ring out after I've moved on to the next note when playing an arpeggio.
Muting definitely needs to be both hands. You can't just rely on the right hand. I see where you're coming from now. However, judicious use of rolling of the fingers can accomplish quite a bit in terms of muting and note separation.
 

BFC

Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
I'm starting to get the 'rolling barre' thing together now. It's not 100% yet but definetly within reach compared to where I was when I originally posted this.

I love this book, btw. My skill level is way up.

Brian
 

Lucidology

Member
Messages
26,842
The 'Rolling Barre"..? This is a new one to me..

A few good sweepers I know,
who use a lot of overdrive are using "scrungys" or wrap around hair pieces,
to help mute the strings or excess noises from running into each other ..
 

Woodyworld

Member
Messages
2,099
I'm not sure it's not cool.

For practicing I would suggest it's better not to use such aids in order to ensure your naturally muting well. However, I sometimes wrap a cloth round my guitar when recording to keep the take as clean as possible. Many a good take has been buggered up by a ping or string catch.

Joseph can you buy these things somewhere?

Here's a pic with the great Dave Martone using a scrunchy ...
& you know that ain't no capo ...

Dave Martone :: Photos | Martone Live | F1010031 copy
 

Lucidology

Member
Messages
26,842
I'm not sure it's not cool.

For practicing I would suggest it's better not to use such aids in order to ensure your naturally muting well. However, I sometimes wrap a cloth round my guitar when recording to keep the take as clean as possible. Many a good take has been buggered up by a ping or string catch.

Joseph can you buy these things somewhere?

scrunchie / skrnch/ • n. a circular band of fabric-covered elastic used for fastening the hair.



Yo Woody ... you should be able to pick one up in any thrift store ...
Anywhere where they sound hair ties..

A lot of slap~funk bass players also use these to stop strings sounds from running into each other ...
 




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