Short-scale guitar?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by KCblues, Aug 20, 2005.

  1. KCblues

    KCblues Member

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    I'm a long time Strat player with small hands. Middle age is bringing on it's share of hand and wrist pain and troubles so I'm looking for a shorter scale guitar that doesn't compromise on quality.

    Warmoth makes a Les Paul scale length neck for a Srat, and I have one of those but it really doesn't make that much difference.

    This morning I played a new Duo-Sonic and it was really comfortable. The problem is the pickups are crap, there are only two of them, and the string spacing is narrower than a standard Strat. The tuners can be replaced, but probably not the bridge.

    Are there any companies out there that build pro-quality short-scale electric guitars?
     
  2. PolyMorf

    PolyMorf Member

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    Chapin makes a scale down to 24.6. Expensive at $2475 + shipping

    Fender Jazzmasters are 24"

    The PRS Santana is 24.5" but VERY expensive.

    I don't know of any short scale strats other than Warmoth conversions. I've looked.

    I'm going to be 52, have slight arthritis and short fingers. I play only short scale guitars and only hardtails.

    For strings I use Ernie Ball hybrids which give some better low end vs straight 9s.

    Regards,

    Harry
     
  3. Boomdoggy

    Boomdoggy Supporting Member

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    The Valley Arts 7/8 size guitars have a short scale on a Strat style guitar.I am sure any custom builder can do it for some $$$$$.I just turned 36 yesterday but I already have some Arthritis and need my guitars to play on the easier side.
     
  4. baald

    baald Member

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    duo sonics are either 24" (the A scale) or 22.xx (i think 22.75") the B scale.
    Warmoth and USACG both make 24" necks and bodies for mustang-style guitars (which hte duosonic and musicmaster were). You can get different nut widths from each company, and USACG will do all of their custom neck shaping for you too. I would not hesitate to have Tommy at USACG make me a neck and body for a project like this. Get it prefinished (he uses Roxy as a finisher and i've heard they do great work) or finish it yourself. Install the hardware and electronics yourself or take it to a tech. you can have a great instrument made to your specs for around a grand.

    one of my all time favorite guitars was a 65 musicmaster that i ended up modding to death (shame on me)

    baald
     
  5. Rich

    Rich Member

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    Anderson Cobras (both the "regular" tele shaped Cobra and the "S" strat shaped) are LP scaled.

    Can get them with a lot of options-- solid, hollowed out, different pups, different neck carves.

    Top drawer if you're not familiar with Anderson. Not inexpensive, but not luthier one-off costly either.
     
  6. Antero

    Antero Member

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    Typo - Jaguars are the 24", Jazzmasters are 25.5"
     
  7. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    +1

    I have a '65 Mustang that I love to death
     
  8. pcutt

    pcutt Member

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    I think the Jackson Fusion is 24-ish inchs. Supposedly the name comes from the strat shaped body with the Les Paul length neck.
     
  9. ricoh

    ricoh Member

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    Fender Jaguars are available at many different prices. The crafted in japan and made in japan models are great guitars . The early vintage jags are pretty amazing. They are also becoming
    pretty expensive.

    Rico
     
  10. stark

    stark Supporting Member

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    I have the same issues, but the short scale guitars are just won't have the tone. First thing I'd do is go with 8's or 9's. This will go a long way to relieving stress on your wrist. Next I would lower your action to about 1/16 at the last fret. Finally work on proper hand position which could be the root of your problem. Turn your amp up, turn the guitar down, play really light and you might get a really big tone.

    Adam Stark
     
  11. KCblues

    KCblues Member

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    Thanks everyone for the advice. I actually still have my first guitar which is a '73 Mustang, and even after all these years it's a lot more comfortable in my hands than my Strats.

    The 24.75" neck from Warmoth is a very nice piece, but just didn't really make that much difference. They told me at the time I bought that neck that they have available 7/8 bodies and necks, but I have yet to see one, and of course that's buying an instrument without playing it first. So I think that I'd like to get down to 24" or less.

    I went ahead and bought a MIM Duo-Sonic the other day to see how the very short scale will work out for me; it was cheap after all. It's taking some getting used to, and may actually be a little too short.

    Thanks,
    KC
     
  12. Lucidology

    Lucidology Member

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    Has anyone here ever played the Valley Arts 7/8 size guitar....?
     
  13. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    I am here as you are here as you are me and we are
    If you haven't already, I'd encourage you to try out a wide range of neck profiles as well.
    As a number of threads on TGP have noted, some folks that have moved to fatter necks have found them to be much more comfortable to play.
    I know that was the case for me, and I didn't find the neck profile that works best until I tried the very largest neck profiles out there.

    Also, fatter neck profiles aren't necessarily limited to larger hand sizes. I've known and read of a fair share of players with smaller hands that have preferred fatter profiles.
     
  14. 73171

    73171 Member

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    Try an Epiphone Elite Byrdland....or a Gibson Byrdland if you've got the $$$$$
     
  15. CitizenCain

    CitizenCain Member

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    My hand doesn't get nearly as tired when playing a fat neck as it does when playing a thin neck. Oneo f the most comfortable guitars I ever had was a R4 Oxblood Les Paul, big fat neck. I have fairly short fingers but that guitar was just a breeze to play.
     
  16. riverastoasters

    riverastoasters Member

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    Hey, I replaced the pickups, wiring, and bridge on My Duo Sonic
    [​IMG]
    It came out fine.
     
  17. riverastoasters

    riverastoasters Member

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    I'm just the opposite. I have two guitars with fat necks. It really sucks to play them, but they sound really good. But I almost never reach for those myself. I can play a skinny neck for hours.
     
  18. CitizenCain

    CitizenCain Member

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    Cool guitar!
     
  19. bluesdoc

    bluesdoc Gold Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah, me too, and I have largish hands. Go figure....

    jon
     
  20. beNsteR

    beNsteR Member

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    Hmm, you asked for a pro-quality short scale instrument.

    I think a PRS Santana III would be a good choice for an off-the-rack pro-quality short scale guitar.

    it's the most affordable Santana model, and streets at about $2000 new. Or you could find a used one for around $1600. it has a big fat screaming lead tone, and with a 24.5 inch scale, is very easy to play. very slinky feel.
     

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