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Shure SM 58 Alternatives?

beanoboy

Member
Messages
76
I'm currently using a Shure SM 58 mic in my Classic Rock band for my vocals. We have a modest PA and play mostly small clubs. The Shure SM 58 is a well known workhorse mic but It feeds back easily before I can get enough volume out of it. Anybody have any alternatives? I'm looking into the Audix OM 5 & 6 and the Sennheiser e 835 and 935 as possibilities? Thanks
 

Mike Monte

Member
Messages
281
Your feedback issues may not stem totally from your mic. I have found that it's usually the mic's proximity to the monitors that make things squeal most of the time.
Mike M
 

orogeny

Member
Messages
10,760
I'm currently using a Shure SM 58 mic in my Classic Rock band for my vocals. We have a modest PA and play mostly small clubs. The Shure SM 58 is a well known workhorse mic but It feeds back easily before I can get enough volume out of it. Anybody have any alternatives? I'm looking into the Audix OM 5 & 6 and the Sennheiser e 835 and 935 as possibilities? Thanks
you are looking at good possibilities
i'll throw in the EV nd767 and the 967. the 967 allows for quite a bit of gain before feedback, but is also a bit less present as a result. love it on acoustic guitars too. both are very good mics. can't go wrong with any of your choices either. find a good deal and just go for it.
 

CRBMoA

Member
Messages
3,754
I carry a Peavey Diamond Series in my gig bag specifically for the excellent off axis rejection.
 

griggsterr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,956
While others are doing a great job of telling you what their favorite mic is. I own several audix and like them.
but there are a lot of things that contribute to feedback.
Here is a short check list and is in no way a complete study on the subject.
I am going to guess that you are saying it feedsback through your monitor?
It would be good to know if you are talking monitor or your main speakers.
In a live situation you shouldn't be experiencing feedback if your speakers are in front of you and you behind them.
So if your monitors are feeding back.
Try using an EQ, if you have one.
if you have one, Here are a few suggestions.
roll off most of the low end below 150hz maybe even below 175 ( while they will sound thin, you will get some of the fullness back from your main speakers, because you will hear them too off axis)
Mic technique. despite all the successful rap artists out there (very tongue in cheek here) DO NOT hold the mic around the ball end. hold it by the shaft. and if you can don't get too close to the ball with that hand.
Now back to the EQ, not always but it is common to bring some frequencies down between 1k, and 4-5k
because your ear is more sensitive to these and the high frequency driver in your monitor is also more efficient there which causes you to get a lot of that back into the mic.
on a 58 it is ok to have the monitor directly in front of you. One of the others posted the beta 58, (not my personal fave) but it will certainly work.
Since it is a hypercardiod mic you will need to move the monitor to about 30 degrees to the right or left, because hypercardiod mics actually pickup quite well directly in back of the mic.

Try some of that stuff and get back to us.
 

Seegs

Member
Messages
10,184
I agree with the others that the feedback problem is not with the mic...

If feedback is your only issue with the SM58 than read no further...

If...like me...you are unsatisfied with how the 58 performs then read on...

IME...there are better choices than a SM58 which will actually help you to improve your vocals...

I am currently using a Shure Beta 58a and the difference it has made in my singing is dramatic...

For a lot more money a Heil PR35 is also a great choice...
 

NamaEnsou

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,650
I've gone through a lot of mics over the years and if you're serious about finding a great mic for your voice the best thing you can do is get as many mics together as you can and do a band practice singing through them. Everyone's voice has a different timbre, a different idea of what they want to sound like, not to mention their personal singing style.

Some mics that have been perfect for other have been not so good for me. Mics I've used onstage include the 58, Beta 58, 57, ElectroVoice 767, Peavey Diamond 535 and 580?, Audio Technica AE-6100 and ATM-5 mini condensor, Sennheiser 845, 945 and 441, AKG D-1000, Beyer TG-90 ribbon and a Heil 35.
I still have a couple of 58's, a 767, a few Sennheiser 845's, a couple 6100's, a pair of ATM-5's, and the Beyer. Several times over the years having done mic shootouts either with my ex where we took turns singing onstage while the other listened or at my friend's studio I've come to the conclusion that the best mic for me regardless of price is the AE-6100 and I think of it as quite possibly the best male vocal mic available. That said I did a stretch of a couple months earlier this year using nothing but the 767 and last year with the Beyer ribbon.
Some other mics we tried during shootouts included Blue and a couple of Audix models.

Go check out as many mics as you can and definitely make an effort to find the all too often overlooked Audio Technica AE-6100.

Anyone that sings in a quieter style make sure to go check out the Beyer TG-90R and Heil 35. Absolutely unbeatable for quieter singing styles.
 
Messages
6,444
AKG D5 is my sound company's primary mic

Don't you find those extremely scooped in the midrange?

I prefer the sound of the SM58 but the beta58 and beta57 have tighter patterns for a loud stage. Audix OM7 is also excellent for a loud stage. I haven't had a chance to really test an EV 767 or Sennheiser 945 in a loud situation.
 

beanoboy

Member
Messages
76
While others are doing a great job of telling you what their favorite mic is. I own several audix and like them.
but there are a lot of things that contribute to feedback.
Here is a short check list and is in no way a complete study on the subject.
I am going to guess that you are saying it feedsback through your monitor?
It would be good to know if you are talking monitor or your main speakers.
In a live situation you shouldn't be experiencing feedback if your speakers are in front of you and you behind them.
So if your monitors are feeding back.
Try using an EQ, if you have one.
if you have one, Here are a few suggestions.
roll off most of the low end below 150hz maybe even below 175 ( while they will sound thin, you will get some of the fullness back from your main speakers, because you will hear them too off axis)
Mic technique. despite all the successful rap artists out there (very tongue in cheek here) DO NOT hold the mic around the ball end. hold it by the shaft. and if you can don't get too close to the ball with that hand.
Now back to the EQ, not always but it is common to bring some frequencies down between 1k, and 4-5k
because your ear is more sensitive to these and the high frequency driver in your monitor is also more efficient there which causes you to get a lot of that back into the mic.
on a 58 it is ok to have the monitor directly in front of you. One of the others posted the beta 58, (not my personal fave) but it will certainly work.
Since it is a hypercardiod mic you will need to move the monitor to about 30 degrees to the right or left, because hypercardiod mics actually pickup quite well directly in back of the mic.

Try some of that stuff and get back to us.
I'll try some stuff tonight at rehearsal. Thanks!
 

griggsterr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,956
Don't get me wrong I have my mics I like, and I have mixed a lot on 58's but if you are having lots of feedback, it's either your monitors, your mic technique, your expectation of the monitor mix or something like that, give me a good bi amped and eq'd monitor rig and I can make that 58 so loud you will beg me to turn it down. Will it sound absolutely wonderful, well probably not,
but I guarantee you can hear yourself.
That being said I worked with a woman at a church that had a beautiful voice, not real powerful though.
she always complained that she could not hear herself.
and in return I told her that she was the only one that ever sings out of that mic, ( I had a $700 Earthworks mic on her)
and to touch her lips on the windscreen. which I still could never get her closer than about 6 inches from the mic.
one time I went over to check her monitor mix, and got in her mic with my big loud voice, and I sent the system into what I call pre feedback where it is getting ready to off. Not thinking that I just could have un plugger her mic, I made a mad dash for the console, when i realized I couldn't get there in time I grabbed her floor wedge and turned it toward the FOH.
which stopped it, but her monitor had so much gain that I couldn't hear for 2 days hardly afterward.
and she could not hear herself.
I finally got her on a set of in ears, and she still had a little trouble.
 

RCM78

Member
Messages
6,279
One other suggestion. Make sure the ball of the mic is clean. If the wind screen inside the ball is clogged it will cause screeching like feedback at lower gain levels...
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,312
That being said I worked with a woman at a church that had a beautiful voice, not real powerful though.
she always complained that she could not hear herself.
and in return I told her that she was the only one that ever sings out of that mic, ( I had a $700 Earthworks mic on her)
and to touch her lips on the windscreen. which I still could never get her closer than about 6 inches from the mic.

The volume may have been scaring her? Inexperienced singers tend to back off when they hear a real monitor, at volume.

For that reason, when you have people make announcements at a show, always kill the monitors, or they'll stay 3' from the mic.
 

griggsterr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,956
The volume may have been scaring her? Inexperienced singers tend to back off when they hear a real monitor, at volume.

For that reason, when you have people make announcements at a show, always kill the monitors, or they'll stay 3' from the mic.
You know I kind of forgot about that one, for like festivals etc Awesome I have done that before but It kind of fell out of my brain. I'm excited to try that. But with her no, like I said even in ears she had to have them just killing her.
 

Otto Tune

Member
Messages
3,852
Elton John still uses a SM-58 and he has THREE gigantic monitors blasting at him.
I'm just saying there's other factors in feedback.
The Beta 58 is more directional, I never liked the Sennheiser 835, and I don't think they'll be better than the 58's.
 

RomanS

Member
Messages
2,338
AKG D5 is my sound company's primary mic

My favorite mic, as well - a lot more feedback resistant than an 58, and needs much less EQing (generally, with 58s I have to turn down bass and low mids quite a bit and boost around 3-3.5 kHz to make them sound clear and cut through the mix - the D5 does that by itself...).
The Sennheiser E935 is another mic I prefer a lot to a 58, also more feedback resistant, tonally it's a bit warmer than the D5, but still a lot clearer than a 58.
 

bob-i

Member
Messages
8,763
I think monitor feedback is usually caused by EQing incorrectly. I'm not an expert, but this works for me...

First off, i find that I need a 1/3 octave EQ. I start completely flat and ring out the monitors with the mains off. Raise the level until it just starts to ring then back it off just a hair. Then I locate the frequency of the ring by raising the EQ bands 2–3 DB and listening for the ring. Once I locate the frequency ringing, cut it 2-3 DB. Then raise the level until the next frequency starts ringing, then find that one.

I find that if you locate 3-4 frequencies that ring first, and cut them a few DB you'll get plenty of volume before feedback.
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,354
Nothing wrong with an SM58.

You could try something like a Sennheiser MD421, Beyer Dynamic M-88, the thing is
then you have to worry about damage and theft.

If the PA is underpowered and pushed too hard that's probably more the problem than a 58.
 




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