Sigur Ros

CharAznable

Silver Supporting Member
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17,613
The greatest band to emerge in the 00's.

How times change... Saw them at the 9:30 club for like $15, front row, in 2002. Just paid $75 to see them at Merriweather, nosebleeds.

At the 9:30, I was so close that I was getting Jonsi's voice straight from him, not from the monitors. He has some pipes, even when he's singing those falsettos.
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
5,079
That is a beautiful & powerful album. I listened to it a ton when it broke, during a particularly rough patch. Since then, the gibberish "lyrics" have really grated on me when I try to listen to SR, but that's just me. I appreciate the voice as an instrument though.
 

Mayo5

Member
Messages
3,411
That is a beautiful & powerful album. I listened to it a ton when it broke, during a particularly rough patch. Since then, the gibberish "lyrics" have really grated on me when I try to listen to SR, but that's just me. I appreciate the voice as an instrument though.
What do you mean gibberish lyrics? They are speaking Icelandic, because they are from Iceland.
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
5,079
WIKI:

"Vonlenska

Vonlenska is the non-literal language that forms the unintelligible lyrics sung by the band on some songs,[70] in particular by Jónsi. It is also commonly known by the English translation of its name, Hopelandic. It takes its name from "Von", a song on Sigur Rós’s debut album Von where it was first used. However, not all Sigur Rós songs are in Hopelandic; many are sung in Icelandic.

Vonlenska has no fixed syntax and differs from constructed languages that can be used for communication. It focuses entirely on the sounds of language; it lacks grammar, meaning, and even distinct words. Instead, it consists of emotive non-lexical vocables and phonemes; in effect, Vonlenska uses the melodic and rhythmic elements of singing without the conceptual content of language. In this way, it is similar to the use of scat singing in vocal jazz. The band's website describes it as "a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music";[71] it is similar in concept to the 'nonsense' language often used by Cocteau Twins singer Elizabeth Fraser in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of the syllable strings sung by Jónsi are repeated many times throughout each song, and in the case of ( ), throughout the whole album."
 

kiki_90291

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,071
I saw them a couple of years ago at the Edgefield in Portland, OR - great outdoor venue. I've seen a ton of live acts and I would never expect to say this about a band like Sigur Ros, given that their music is so low key, but it was probably the best live show I've ever seen. If you ever get a chance to see them live, you really should.

I flew to Europe last summer via Iceland air and they had "Heima" playing on the entertainment system. "Heima" is a film they made after returning from a world tour - they played free shows all over Iceland in community centers, farms, etc. It's a great film, not just for the music, but to see a little of what Iceland is like. If you haven't seen it, I highly recommend checking it out.

We stayed over in Reykjavik for a couple of days and I really want to go back and spend more time exploring Iceland (in the summer - heh!) - it's a beautiful country.
 

NicDo

Member
Messages
1,819
That is a beautiful & powerful album. I listened to it a ton when it broke, during a particularly rough patch. Since then, the gibberish "lyrics" have really grated on me when I try to listen to SR, but that's just me. I appreciate the voice as an instrument though.

Same for me. They have such a nice sound- but in the documentary I watched recently EVERY song had the same "You Sail" made-up lyric in each performance.
My wife and I started to sing it for them and it always came in on cue! Now it's all I can hear when they get played.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
5,521
Unique sound...Are they still down to a trio (at least in the studio)? Their keyboard player left 1-2 yrs ago, he was a huge part of "that sound", like the guy in Pink Floyd was for them.
 

Thedude99

Member
Messages
2,505
Amazing band - I have been a fan since Von came out.

They are an intensely powerful and beautiful band live. Although I have not seen them since one of the original members left. For those that have seen them before and after, has this affected them?
 

scmavl

Enjoyer
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,586
Unique sound...Are they still down to a trio (at least in the studio)? Their keyboard player left 1-2 yrs ago, he was a huge part of "that sound", like the guy in Pink Floyd was for them.

I saw them live a couple of months ago and yes, they were a trio. I've seen them a few times and it's just better every time.

FDED1DF4-68C2-4BE8-BB54-207917CC191C.jpg
 

eddie knuckles

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,787
I briefly met Orri and Kjartan and Kjartan's wife (member of the then string quartet Amiina). They were not very well versed in English (nor I in Icelandic), but genuinely grateful and polite to my geek-a-zoid fandom. I saw them on the Valtari tour, and there were about 11 people in the band with the trio more up front. Used to get 1st to 3rd row for these guys easily back in the day. Boston Opera House gig on the Takk tour blew me away. I had to pick my face up off the floor when it was over. :eek:)
Kjartan put out a 4 act opera in the fall. Really beautiful. Love me some Sigur Ros, but I was really bummed when Kjartan left to do other things. I felt he was more of the musician/arranger of the group. No dis to the rest of the band, they are amazing. This Kjartan release is really nice, and wonder where the band would be now if he remained.
http://kjartansveinsson.com/
 

Mayo5

Member
Messages
3,411
WIKI:

"Vonlenska

Vonlenska is the non-literal language that forms the unintelligible lyrics sung by the band on some songs,[70] in particular by Jónsi. It is also commonly known by the English translation of its name, Hopelandic. It takes its name from "Von", a song on Sigur Rós’s debut album Von where it was first used. However, not all Sigur Rós songs are in Hopelandic; many are sung in Icelandic.

Vonlenska has no fixed syntax and differs from constructed languages that can be used for communication. It focuses entirely on the sounds of language; it lacks grammar, meaning, and even distinct words. Instead, it consists of emotive non-lexical vocables and phonemes; in effect, Vonlenska uses the melodic and rhythmic elements of singing without the conceptual content of language. In this way, it is similar to the use of scat singing in vocal jazz. The band's website describes it as "a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music";[71] it is similar in concept to the 'nonsense' language often used by Cocteau Twins singer Elizabeth Fraser in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of the syllable strings sung by Jónsi are repeated many times throughout each song, and in the case of ( ), throughout the whole album."
TIL.
 

Cool Hand

Member
Messages
251
I saw then when my son was attending Univ of Buffalo somewhere around 2000. Stood right in front of the stage, front row.
Been a fan ever since.
For some reason I like to listen to them when I go to Myrtle Beach in March and look for shark's teeth.
 

ksandvik

Member
Messages
6,328
Iceland is full of cool bands (250k people, how do they do it), heres Reptile, don't exist today but they did wacky pop:

 




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