Silent Guitar Users

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by spence, Feb 28, 2020.

  1. spence

    spence Supporting Member

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    You guys that have a Yamaha Silent Guitar (SLG200S steel string), how are you getting along with it? Pros & Cons? How is it for stage use?
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2020
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  2. mastercaster

    mastercaster Member

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    I just bought one a week ago. The more I play it the more I like it. I bought it for practice though, so as I don't disturb others and more importantly I am not disturbed and distracted.
    Best of all the practice devices I own, Digitech Trio plus, iPad and interface, looper pedals, computer, multieffect pedal...
    Best because I just have to pick it up, put on the headphone and play. I do plug my metronome into the aux a lot too. Will get a bluetooth reciever for wireless ipad app use, metronome. drums, backing tracks and Truefire app.
    Plan to buy a amp for playing with others soon also.
    Will say though the set up is fair for a mail order guitar I would like to lower at the nut a smidge when I change strings. Maybe at the saddle too, very little at each location. more than playable out of the box.
     
  3. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm intrigued by it. My intended use would be for open mics or other events where I'm only gonna do a song or two.

    There are a lot of times when I'm going straight from work to one of these things, so I have to bring my nice guitar into the office with me, worry about keeping it out of hot/cold weather, etc. I figure the silent guitar would be compact and durable enough to leave in the car all the time if I wanted to.

    OTOH, last night I played one of these one-song-per-writer deals in a pretty big room, and the sound system was lousy. There was no monitor at all, so I was relying somewhat on the sound of my guitar to sing to. Obviously a silent guitar wouldn't have been as useful and I'd have been pretty screwed if that was the only instrument I had carried.
     
  4. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    Love my narrow nut nylon (2 inches). Blending the piezo and mic simulator gets out the quack. And as long as you don't go nuts both the reverb and chorus are really nice. I tend to lean towards the chorus more.

    Check youtube. No shortage of samples.

    And yes the portability and lack of fragility really are game changers. In one of the more recent filmed pink floyd concerts Gilmore plays one onstage. Good enough for Dave...
     
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  5. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    A cheap used roland cube would solve all the problems. Including busking. You would have to invest in a hat though. No case for folks to put the money in :D
     
  6. Outlaw

    Outlaw Member

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  7. spence

    spence Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the input guys. Do you find it uncomfortable resting your arm on the frame? There's a guy out there (Mike Forrester)who makes a decent looking armrest for it, so that's an option. Is the pickguard firm, or flimsy? I rest 3 fingers sometimes, and need some good support there. might be easy to modify if it's flimsy. I also hear that there's a good bit of noise if you rest your palm on the bridge. Yamaha's site shows the finish in matte and glossy, but I haven't seen any options for a choice anywhere.
     
  8. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    The armrest leaves a mark, but not like cheap, plastic edge binding on a bad guitar. It's smooth and not sharp, but if playing on the couch and my forearm is the prime point of contact to make the guitar stable, yes it leaves a mark.

    The pickguard is firm, but floats being anchored on one edge. Intentionally I believe. For "striking" techniques. It's pretty stable but I believe it's designed to be loud if you strike it.

    As to the bridge, I have never really rested my palm on it. Next time I plug in I'll see. With normal muting I've never notice anything.

    There's a plain brown (the one I have) and a kind of burst. I would describe the basic brown as semi-matte. It's not full matte by any means. It looks "organic" if that makes any sense.
     
  9. spence

    spence Supporting Member

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    Thank you sir!
     
  10. DGA

    DGA Supporting Member

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    I don't know about the stage part, but I love my SLG200! I've traveled with it on airplanes many times. I've used it in hotel rooms with my iPad running backing tracks and TrueFire lessons. I use it when I want to play acoustic after the family has gone to bed.

    If you get one, definitely take it in for a setup. I played mine for about a year before I did and I lick myself for that.
     
  11. Tony Done

    Tony Done Member

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    I've never tried one, but the design seems to involve a "solid" connection between nut and bridge, more like an electric than an acoustic. Do the steel string models have the attack and sustain characteristics of an acoustic, or are they more like an electric?
     
  12. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    I don't have a steel. But the pickup system is combination Piezo and mic simulator. So it's basically combining the two (if you're smart) to emulate an acoustic. Throw a little of the built in verb/chorus, and it sounds as real as any other solid-ish guitar out there. In other words is sounds better than straight piezo, but it's also not a true acoustic. And that includes all the downsides of acoustics.

     
  13. Tony Done

    Tony Done Member

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    How do you think that sustain compares with a nylon string acoustic? A bit more?
     
  14. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    I mostly play Bossa Nova inspired stuff. Sustain isn't an issue. I don't think it sustains more than a decent classical. Obviously reverb gives you that impression. I don't think mine has extra sustain. I use normal tension though. High might change things.
     
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  15. spence

    spence Supporting Member

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    Seems like most videos out there show guys finger picking these. I wonder how it stands up to hard strumming and hand noise.
     
  16. Emigre

    Emigre Member

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    I play classical guitar, and had two different versions, the 130 and the 200. Both were the nylon string classical style versions.

    IME, they do sustain a whole lot more than a classical, to the point where it’s irritating imo. And the sound is difficult to get right (too bassy, too muddy or too thin) and sounds consistently not like a classical, imo, perhaps not unpleasant but it’s lacking the qualities of a classical guitar.

    On the plus side, I thought it was put together really well and easy to play with lower than average action for a classical. Of course it doesn’t need to vibrate a top. It is however a quality instrument.

    It is what it is, a solid body with a piezo. It will sound a few miles off a decent student classical (and not in a good way).

    But, it’s the thing to get if you require a collapsible nylon string guitar.
     
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  17. Tony Done

    Tony Done Member

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    That confirms my intuition.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2020
  18. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    Not going to argue with you since I don't play classical, just Bossa Nova and Willie Nelson :D

    I am curious what your #1 is though. Just for comparison's sake.
     
  19. Emigre

    Emigre Member

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    Definitely no argument as it's just one opinion :)

    Yes depending on what you play the guitar may be a great fit indeed. A guitar player in Sydney uses it in a popular gypsy jazz group to great effect.

    For classical pieces with arpeggio passages, like Romance Di Amor or Recuerdos, the increased sustain gets in the way, notes need to die off or the piece becomes kind of a mess. Generally I wasn't vibing it for classical (*IMO, ymmv, I'm sure someone is going to post a video where someone is nailing Recurdos on a silent guitar :))

    My student classical was an Almansa 434 and my current classical is an Adalid model 12. very nice guitar, though no Redgrave ;)
     
  20. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    Very nice indeed!
     

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