Single Pedals or Multi Effects Pedal? Help!

pedalbored

Member
Messages
469
I'm getting an almost illegal amount back on my taxes this year. It's time to upgrade my effects. Right now I'm only using a Boss CS3 Compressor, and a Boss TU2 Tuner. The other effects, tho quite lame, are built into the amp I'm using, a Marshall MG250 DFX (chourus, delay, flanger). I need more "voices" since I'm the guitarist in a three piece band doing Top 40 Country and classic rock. The compressor I have stays on on the time. I'm using the delay in the amp almost all the time. I'm not real keen on programable pedalboards because they seem too complex, and hard to use live. The single pedal theory is good, but a lot of expense in the long run. How do you other people feel? I'm looking at a Boss ME50, or just getting a few Boss Pedals and buying a empty pedalboard like a Furman, and just building one up. What works for you?
 

joeysmac

Member
Messages
50
Don't get a multi-effects pedal. No one does everything well enough to put it all in one package (unless you insist on getting all boos pedals anyways, then go ahead with a boss multi effects unit)...but if I were you I'd do a TGP search for "boutique pedal" and find you some cool individual pedals by companies that specialize in making that type of effect. My advice:

1. Do your homework
2. Buy used pedals so you can get all your money back if you buy it and don't like it (and save money if you do like it)
3. Be patient and find what it is that you want (don't settle or cheap copies)
4. Donate some of you refund back to me for helping you out!

I'm selling some cool overdrive/boost pedals in the $125-$175 price range if you are interested (T-Rex Moller, Barber Direct Drive, Divided by 13 Dyna Ranger)

Good luck man!
 

ruach1

Member
Messages
179
Other advantages to single pedals:
1. When your multieffects goes down, you lose everything. When a pedal goes down, you have the rest.
2. Pedals are much easier to tweak under real band conditions. The programming done in your bedroom on a multieffect box will sound all wrong in a live mix with drums, etc.
3. When you decide that your chorus sucks, you don't have to sell your flanger/fuzz/vibe with it.
4. Multieffects never become classic collectables, whereas old pedals are often preferred to their new replacements. So, my Zoom 2020, if it still worked, might be worth $1, but most any old Boss pedal is worth something.
 

fuzz_factor

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,073
I bought a used Digitech RP250 for practicing. I have to say that I've always enjoyed tube amps and the Digitech just doesn't cut it. Almost all of the pre-programmed sounds are crap. Upon tweaking it, I found maybe a couple of usable sounds, but they wear thin pretty quick. The Champ 600 I bought afterwards sounds much better. Even thought the Digi supposedly models famous effects like a Rat and a Fuzz Face, it's just not the same. You can't, say, turn down the volume on your guitar and have the Fuzz Face model clean up.

In fact, the only reason I'm keeping the Digitech is for the built-in drum patterns, which are OK since I'm not inclined to spend time fooling around with a drum machine.

I don't think the Digitech would be very workable live, but if I ONLY needed it for the effects (not the amp models), it might be OK. Using something like a Boss ME50 would probably be better because it's like having many stompboxes in one (instead of scrolling through patches).

If I were 15 again, and wanted to play with chorus, delay, pitch shifting, super heavy metal gain, etc. I'd probably LOVE the Digitech. I wish they had those things when I was 15!

Hmm, I think I might have rambled off topic a little, but be sure to spend some quality time auditing any multi-effects unit you might buy. If you're pretty tone conscious, you might be better served with individual effects. Then again, I have a friend who loves delayed, effected, high gain, nu-metal style harmonized guitar parts and he loves his RP250. Different strokes...

Good luck!

- jeff -
 

pgissi

Member
Messages
2,481
You can't, say, turn down the volume on your guitar and have the Fuzz Face model clean up.
Exactly, nothing but analog pedals will respond to volume pot on the guitar or volume pedal changes.

Been there done that with digital rack processors as far back as 1990, you end up living in the "preset" mentality of which there is less subtlety or range of tones in between presets and you end up with tones that end up sounding as drastic transitions from one tone to the next rather than more gradual and incremental transistions when you want that.

Then there is the matter of the modeling accuracy. Sure there are procs out there that do it well and thats a whole other topic and I dont know and cant say if they are as organic in tone or feel or respond to pot or vol pedal changes since I have not tried one.

But I do know that pedals into a tube amp is a guaranteed pleasing experience.

Yeah on occassion you want stark, maybe going from sweetly clean to OD from hell in a blink and you can still accomplish that with analog pedals.

I also agree with the other post, consider a good tube amp as your next move, establish your base tone and then add some pedals.

IMO the worst aspect of the multi-fx boxes whether they be some form of analog/digital hybrid or modelling is at gig levels most of them sound thin. Its my opinion and I am not interested in debating this since for me its based on my experiences long ago and I have determined its the AD conversion that is reason #1 for this and continues from there.

I think I am valid in that point given the fact that tube amps and analog pedals etc. have experienced a renaissance in the last 20 years that has eclipsed all the years before, it proves that the technology although rooted in older designs and components, really delivers something special.

If that were not the case, they (tube amps and analog pedals) would have faded and gone like it was said they would way back in the early 80's.

Get your self a low wattage tube amp (so you can crank it up), some good speakers/cab and 1 good OD and pair it up with your Compressor and TU-2 and find what you have been missing.
 

pedalbored

Member
Messages
469
As always, GREAT advise from TGP users. I think I've decided to go with single pedals into a pedalboard, and not a multi effects unit. I can add and take out effects at will, build an arsenal, and always be able to tweak as I go. Thanks everyone!
 

drbob1

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
27,613
But listen to the other thing first! That's NOT a great amp to use as the foundation for you killer tone! Having a clean tone you can be proud of, then adding pedals is definitely the way to go. How big rooms are you playing? Can you afford a really decent amp (figure between $800-2000) now? Actually for country, you could probably find a used Fender Twin Reissue for less (I bought my last one for $450) and that kills for country and as a base for pedals. Then start small with the pedals, do your research and find the stuff you can afford. As time goes on and the sickness worsens you spend more, but break yourself in slowly...
 

NortheastHick

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,590
I also STRONGLY suggest dumping that amp first!! Putting either pedals or multifx into it is NOT going to sound good. A much better upgrade would be a decent amp first, then decide what pedals you need.
 

papersoul

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
13,648
Do any of you pedal guys find it tough to make quick changes live, say from a chorus'ed clean to a boosted lead with delay? Or, do you just add effects gradually with transitions?

I worry about running out of real estate on the board.

What about line drivers? Most people say you should use a line driver, something like the VHT Valvulator, Dunlop Line driver or Creation Audio Labs Redeemer which actually goes in the guitar cavity. Even though I hate having to pedal dance, I LOVE having everything in real time because I hate programming effects. The signal consistancy can be an issue if you have a combo of bufferred and so called true bypass pedals. A line driver is more real estate taken up.
What about tap tempo and delay length? Not much available with analog delay!
I have an Egnater Mod50 head which requires line level effects in the loop! This is difficult to find and makes it tough to nbuy analog pedals! I can use chorus in front of the amp and sometimes prefer this, but delay I like in the loop and I can only find 2 pedals that are line level and analog, Dunlop Carbon Copy(not exactly boutique) and the Maxon AD-9 Pro with only 400ms of delay. That is why I use the TC Electronics Nova delay and deal with it although I wonder about the converters!
I also need a boost in the loop and that is another struggle because I need line level. The best I have found is a modded MXR 10 band EQ or the boutique ($219) Creation audio Labs MK boost.
So, you see I am limited in the boutique EQ pedals I can use.
Thoughts?
 

Birddog

Member
Messages
3,118
Other advantages to single pedals:
1. When your multieffects goes down, you lose everything. When a pedal goes down, you have the rest.
2. Pedals are much easier to tweak under real band conditions. The programming done in your bedroom on a multieffect box will sound all wrong in a live mix with drums, etc.
3. When you decide that your chorus sucks, you don't have to sell your flanger/fuzz/vibe with it.
4. Multieffects never become classic collectables, whereas old pedals are often preferred to their new replacements. So, my Zoom 2020, if it still worked, might be worth $1, but most any old Boss pedal is worth something.
+1. I went from single effects, to a multi-unit, back now (happily) to single effects. They are much more flexible on the fly and especially when gigging.
 

gang twanger

Member
Messages
943
You definitely should upgrade to a tube amp, IMO, especially for country. Also, I prefer in the long run to go with good quality analog pedals rather than a digital multi-effects unit. Right now I have a Korg AX1500 that I pretty much only use for delay and occasionally for reverb, but I don't dare use it for distortion/OD or for it's amp models. I feel that I can get way better sound from a half way decent tube amp that has a good clean sound. I can then build up my OD/Distortion/Fuzz/Treble Booster (ETC.) collection, and maybe get a pedalboard for them to make it easier to haul them around. Or I can use a 2 channel amp and use the lead channel for OD/distortion sounds (I prefer to go the clean tube amp sound mixed with OD/Dist pedals route). Either way, I think that analog pedals into a clean amp will get you way better sound than the amp model of a digital multi-effects unit will sound.I believe that smaller size is the only real benefit of using those multi-boxes, and for me that's not enough.
 

KCWM

Member
Messages
4,737
I concur about upgrading the amp. There are some good tube amps at the under $500 range, like the Peavey Classic 50 or Crate Palomino V32 (both of which I've owned and really liked), among many, many others.
 

trower

[geer/peyj] hubris confusion paralysis by analysis
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,491
Starts with a good dough (Amp) effect pedals are the topping :rolleyes:
 

Julia343

Member
Messages
7,611
If it's an almost "illegal amount back" (defined in my book as over $3000)I'd start with a Soldano or Mesa head and a nice cabinet. If you do it right you still might have enough left over for a GT-10.
 

jcollins

Member
Messages
73
If I was you and playing country/classic rock...

Start with a RI Deluxe Reverb or Hotrod Deluxe.

Then go to your local music store and try out some pedals. Boss is fine, you're only getting around a 10% improvement with the boutiques.

A big no on the multipedal effects.

Really do some thinking about what effects you'll really be using, be prepared to re-arrange your pedalboard.

I try and keep the number of pedals on my board to 5-6. More than that and I'm spending all my time stomping pedals rather than concentrating on playing to the crowd/actually playing music. An inline tuner is nice...the boss one sucks tone big time, I use an AB box to keep it out of my signal path.
 

wc8485

Member
Messages
228
+ to the above...
Added: Make sure you are happy with your core tone pieces first and foremost... Gtr > Cable > Amp.
 

richey88

Member
Messages
1,548
I concur with everyone here, get a good tube amp as a foundation. After having a rack/pwr amp rig, SS w/efx, and decent tube amp/pedal rig (I was completely out of control with the number of pedals on a board at one point), I have found that for a gig like the OP's (I was in a wedding band but only had to step on 4 buttons) two, three tops good pedals on the floor and a good tube amp will get you through just about anything. Something 15-40 watts, 1 to 4x12 cab speaker (either combo or head/cab, I like 20 watts and a 4x12, fills the space without killing your bandmates and audience) should get you through any gig unless you're playing stadiums......
 

peacebone

Member
Messages
737
Avoid the multieffects! I don't have many regrets in life, but I regret playing with multi FX pedals for so long. It'll be such a boost to your sound and your style to have a customized pedal board with all your favorite sounds.
 




Trending Topics

Top