Skunk stripe on a fretboard + neck build?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by pold, Dec 27, 2017.


  1. pold

    pold Member

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    I noticed that normally people using fretboard + neck method, they use no skunk stripe (between the fretboard and the neck), but normally this happens because they don't make any banana shape channell, so i think this is wrong. I think the best way is to carve the banana channel, then insert the truss rod, then insert the skunk stripe, then finally glue the fretboard. Does anybody do this?
     
  2. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    Actually, that is how most everyone does it. Route the channel in the neck blank, install the truss rod, add the filet strip, then glue on the fingerboard.

    I have not heard of any other method, unless not using a truss rod or using a double action rod that may not need a wood filet strip on top of it.

    Of course the other method is to install the rod from the back side of the neck. In that case the skunk stripe is visible from the back.
     
  3. stratamania

    stratamania Member

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    Skunk stripes are normally used when routed from the back and thus end up as a visible feature.

    If you rout from the fingerboard side and then put a fingerboard on after installing a truss rod often there is not even a filler strip. Its also going to depend on the truss rod type in use etc.
     
  4. pold

    pold Member

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    ah yes, maybe if you use a double action rod, in that case the banana is not needed. But I am planning on using the single truss rod, because it's lighter, so, as you confirm, putting a skunk stripe (from the fretboard side) is necessary. Thanks.
     
  5. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    Yes, if you do a curved route for the truss rod, it will require a skunk stripe regardless of top or bottom location. I usually use the same wood as the neck for the filets strip as it tends to move (expand contract) at the same rate as the neck wood. Others will use whatever they have, but that could expand differently and cause the neck to crack or move in a direction not expected.

    Its also good practice to shape the filet strip the same as the curved rod. So there is minimal tension on the wood.
     
  6. pold

    pold Member

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    I would do exactly the same, shape both the skunk and the channel rounded, so the rod inside stay very tight. Do you use hide glue or titebond for this?
     
  7. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    Titebond is ok. White glue is better. Elmer’s white glue or really any white wood glue. But titebond original will work just find.
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    you lost me.

    if you do it from the top before the board goes on why would there need to be a skunk stripe? gibsons don't have one.

    or are you calling whatever wood you fill the gaps in the truss rod channel with a "skunk stripe" whether or not it shows from the back of the neck?
     
  9. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    Yea, sorry I was trying to use the OP’s terminology. Regardless of the location of the route, it needs to be plugged with a filler strip sometimes called a filet strip. A single rod always gets plugged. A double rod not always gets plugged if done under the fret board. Gibson uses a piece of maple in their mahogany necks to plug the route channel and its visible from the pickup route on long tennon necks
     
  10. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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  11. pold

    pold Member

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    how is it possible not to use a skunk if you use a single truss rod on a Gibson?
     
  12. stratamania

    stratamania Member

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    walterw likes this.
  13. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    i wonder why? wouldn't matching mahogany be more appropriate from an expansion/contraction standpoint?
     
  14. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    I think so too. Only thing I can think of is if they thought the mahogany would compress under pressure of the rod.
     

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